Eric Saxon, Public Broadcasting Fellow at KOPN

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KOPN’s transmitter, located east of Columbia, MO

Greetings gentle reader, I’m Eric Saxon, a Masters of Information and Library Science student specializing in archives at the University of Missouri – Columbia, and part of the second cohort of the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF). This summer, I embarked on a deep tape diving expedition at the radio station, KOPN.

KOPN 89.5 FM, community radio from Columbia, Missouri, broadcasts to antennas throughout the central part of the state and via online at kopn.org. KOPN has transmitted information and music since 1973 AD. As part of the PBPF mission to record local histories across the nation, I set out to discover Columbia and KOPN as it existed in the first twenty or so years of the station, through a media format heretofore unfamiliar to me, the ¼ in. audio tape reel.

The idea was to give these audio reels new life through digital preservation, and, subsequently, new access points to the history of community radio in Columbia, MO in the era of the ¼ in. magnetic tape.

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A ¼ in. magnetic audio tape reel

What I ended up recording is only a small piece of this history, but the audible trace there tells a story of a community radio station being born out of the progressive ethos of the 1960s, open to and actively exploring all available ideas during the 1970s, and incompletely mutating into new wave ideals of the 1980s. During the era of the magnetic tape, KOPN filled a void in mid-Missouri left by mainstream broadcast radio and television, serving across an intersection of race, class, gender, style, sexuality, attitude, and musical preference.

The collection is particularly strong in broadcasts that represent feminist discourse and practice of the time, and my predecessor (Rebecca Benson, PBPF Spring 2018 Fellow) had already begun work that focused on feminist community radio. Having inherited her excellent start to the project, I built upon the theme and expanded it to include live music broadcasts and a wide range of programming, all under the umbrella of feminist community radio.

To convey an idea of this breadth, some titles of the audio broadcasts I digitized include Betty Friedan in Columbia (1973); Don Cooper Live at KOPN (1973); Consciousness Across the Void (1973); Angela Davis in Columbia (1974); Political Gayness (1974); National Women’s Music Festival (1975); The End of “Alternative Radio” on WGTB (1976); Off Our Backs (1976); The Fabulish Winotones Live (1977); Numerology (1978); The Booty Band: Demo Tape (1978); Reasonably Polite New Wave (1981); Program on Lesbian Separatism (1981); DuChamp Live at the Blue Note (1981); Bella Azbug at MU (1984); Gloria Kaufman, “The Politics of Humor: A Feminist View” (1992);  City Council Meetings; and discussions by the Women’s Health Collective.

I transferred only a few reels from the 1990s to a digital format, and none from the 2000s. (By that time, the station had switched to digital machines.) However, a quick listen to KOPN today will tell you that the community values and open radio format there in the beginning continue to be the guiding forces of the station.

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Kansas City new wave band, DuChamp. Handmade collage on tape reel box.

The digitization process not only transferred content but also often recorded the unique physical characteristics of the tape and its interaction with the reel-to-reel tape machines, which, in the University of Missouri – Columbia KOPN Digitization Station’s case, are the Studer A807 (mono) and the Studer B67 (stereo). These were hooked up to a PC and a Mac desktop computer, respectively, where both utilized the audio editing software, Audacity. I could have removed some tape hiss, a sizzle of magnetic particles here and there, and other imperfections, but I left in all but the most egregious content obfuscators, not only to digitize as much as possible in the time allotted, but also as an aesthetic choice and to preserve the unique qualities of the tape medium itself.

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The Studer A807

Emancipating the tape reels from their media-specific obscurity required multiple other steps, with some reels needing more TLC and resuscitation than others. After vigilant cleaning of the machines between reels, this process might entail repairing splices that popped off during the recording process, adding leader tape to the heads and tails of reels, re-housing tapes with broken parts, periodic demagnetizing of the tape machines, untangling and re-spooling tape that had become curled and twisted, and baking/dehydrating tapes exhibiting “sticky-shed syndrome” where deteriorating binder material becomes unfixed in the tape path and gums up the machine’s moving parts. In addition to the more physical aspects of the project, there was also record creation for each reel, inventory production, metadata researched and added, checksum generation, audio file conversion, and ingest into the mothership servers at WGBH.

Although I worked independently, at every stage I had a network of experts and mentors to turn to when encountering an obstacle, from the immersion week of audiovisual preservation training in Boston to the final handoff of the files. Thanks go out to the amazing folks at WGBH and all involved in immersion week, including George Blood and Jackie Jay for introducing me to legacy A/V equipment, all my fellow Fellows, host mentor Jackie Casteel and everyone at KOPN, faculty mentor Dr. Sarah Buchanan and the scholars at MU’s Allen Institute, local mentor Jim Hone, and every one else involved in this far-reaching project.

Going forward, I’m excited to bring forth more untold and seldom heard stories from their various limbos, utilizing what I learned as a PBPF fellow to help make a more complete historical record that is inclusive of the entire spectrum of human experience.

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Minimal audio preservation setup: computer, reel-to-reel tape machine, human

Written by Eric Saxon, PBPF Summer 2018 Cohort

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About PBPF

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, supports ten graduate student fellows at University of North Carolina, San Jose State University, Clayton State University, University of Missouri, and University of Oklahoma in digitizing at-risk materials at public media organizations around the country. Host sites include the Center for Asian American Media, Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, and KOPN Community Radio. Contents digitized by the fellows will be preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The grant also supports participating universities in developing long-term programs around audiovisual preservation and ongoing partnerships with their local public media stations.

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work.

 

American Archive of Public Broadcasting’s Advisory Committees to Guide Public Media Preservation

Education Advisory Committee, Scholar Advisory Committee and Stations and Producers Advisory Committee to Guide American Archive of Public Broadcasting’s Preservation Efforts

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) has announced three new advisory committees: The Education Advisory Committee (EduAC), the Scholar Advisory Committee (SAC) and the Stations and Producers Advisory Committee (SPAC). These three groups of public media advocates and experts in their fields will grow the AAPB’s reach and engagement and will provide feedback on how to improve the AAPB’s operations as relates to each group’s unique needs. This initiative is made possible with funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The AAPB, a collaboration between Boston public media station WGBH and the Library of Congress, has been working to digitize and preserve more than 50,000 hours of broadcasts and previously inaccessible programs from public radio and public television’s more than 70-year legacy. A list of Committee members is available at http://americanarchive.org/about-the-american-archive/advisory-committees.

 “The AAPB is a vast resource and a unique catalogue of our nation’s history through the lens of public media and local perspectives. The feedback we receive from our new committees is crucial to making the AAPB as accessible and user-friendly as possible to key communities across the country,” said Karen Cariani, David O. Ives Executive Director of the WGBH Media Library and Archives and WGBH’s Project Director for the AAPB. “We look forward to collaborating with scholars, educators, stations and producers and expanding the reach of the AAPB.”

The SAC, comprised of scholars from universities, academic and cultural institutions and non-profits from across the U.S., will collaborate on developing ways to engage with scholars and students, discuss how the AAPB can better support research, provide feedback on the AAPB’s website usability and accessibility, advise on future collections significant for preservation and assist in outreach across their academic networks. SAC scholars represent expertise in a range of fields, including public history, media, cinema, library and information science, journalism, science and American studies. The AAPB’s audio and video content from public media stations is a rich resource for research across these topics and more. The SAC’s input will help the AAPB make the use of these resources more accessible for researchers.

A group of education professionals comprise the EduAC. This committee will help the AAPB assess how it can better grow the usage of public media materials in k-12 and community college classrooms. EduAC will advise the AAPB on how to build better and/or integrate with existing online educational tools, to engage with k-12 students and better support educators in the field, and will act as advocates for public media preservation in their networks and communities.

The SPAC will bring together members of the public media community to gather input on how the AAPB can help stations preserve public media and make their historic content more accessible. The SPAC will offer feedback on the archiving services most needed by public media stations and identify significant collections and content for preservation.

The AAPB is a national effort to preserve at-risk public media and provide a central web portal for access to the programming that public stations and producers have created over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized, and the Archive aims to grow by up to 25,000 additional hours per year. The entire collection is available for research on location at WGBH and the Library, and currently more than 30,000 programs are available in the AAPB’s Online Reading Room at americanarchive.org to anyone in the United States.

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About the American Archive of Public Broadcasting

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and more than 30,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

About WGBH

WGBH Boston is America’s preeminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the Web, including Frontline, Nova, American Experience, Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Arthur, and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle, and children’s series. WGBH also is a major supplier of programming for public radio and a partner with Public Radio International (PRI). As a leader in educational multimedia for the classroom, WGBH supplies content to PBS LearningMedia, a national broadband service for teachers and students. WGBH also is a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to those with hearing or visual impairments. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards and Oscars. Find more information at www.wgbh.org.

About the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States – and extensive materials from around the world – both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

About The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Founded in 1969, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation endeavors to strengthen, promote, and, where necessary, defend the contributions of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse and democratic societies by supporting exemplary institutions of higher education and culture as they renew and provide access to an invaluable heritage of ambitious, path-breaking work. Additional information is available at mellon.org.

AAPB Welcomes Six New Executive Advisory Council Members

Judy Woodruff, Bill Siemering, Lloyd Morrisett, Mary Minow, Jennifer Lawson and Edward Ayers Join Seven Others to Inform and Guide the AAPB

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), is pleased to announce the addition of six new members to the AAPB Executive Advisory Council, a distinguished group of 13 individuals that informs and guides the strategic direction of the AAPB to ensure that the Archive continues to serve the needs of public media stakeholders and the American people. The AAPB, a collaboration between Boston public media station WGBH and the Library of Congress, has been working to digitize and preserve more than 50,000 hours of broadcasts and previously inaccessible programs from public radio and public television’s more than 70-year legacy.

New Executive Advisory Council Members

image001Edward Ayers
Ayers is the Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities and president emeritus at the University of Richmond and co-host of BackStory with the American History Guys, a nationally syndicated radio show and podcast, Ayers was awarded the presidential National Humanities Medal in July 2013 as historian of the American South and pioneer in digital history. He won the Bancroft Prize and Beveridge Prize in American history and has collaborated on major digital history projects including the Valley of the Shadow, American Panorama, and Bunk.

image002Jennifer Lawson – Vice Chair
Lawson is a media consultant based in Washington, D.C. A former executive vice president of Programming and Promotion Services at PBS, in 2016 Lawson received the Ralph Lowell Award, public television’s highest honor. Lawson has also received lifetime achievement awards from American Public Television and the Public Television Programmers’ Association. Lawson was senior vice president for Television and Digital Content at the CPB and served as vice chair of the PBS Board, Chair of the American Public Television and as a member of the Advisory Board of Washington Women in Film and Video.

image003Mary Minow
Minow is a Presidential Appointee to the National Museum and Library Services Board at the Institute of Museum and Library Services and a Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. Minow serves as a Board Member of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), consultant to the American Library Association, and is an attorney, consultant, and a former librarian.

image004Lloyd Morrisett
Morrisett served as President of The John and Mary R. Markle Foundation where he initiated the Foundation’s program in communications and information technology. Previously, Morrisett was Vice President of the Carnegie Corporation of New York and of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching where he worked to start the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). He was co-creator of the Sesame Workshop and is a trustee and chairman emeritus of the Sesame Workshop.

image005Bill Siemering
Siemering was a member of the founding board of directors for NPR and the author of its original mission statement. As NPR’s first director of programming, Siemering led the development of All Things Considered and developed Fresh Air into a national program. The recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, Siemering worked with the Open Society Foundation in Eastern Europe, Africa and Mongolia before founding Developing Radio Partners to enrich the programming of local stations in Africa. He received a Lifetime Achievement Award from NPR and currently serves as Senior Fellow at the Wyncote Foundation.

image006Judy Woodruff – Chair
Woodruff is Anchor and Managing Editor of the PBS NewsHour. She’s covered politics and news for more than four decades, serving as anchor and senior correspondent for CNN, as the chief Washington Correspondent for The MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour, anchor at the PBS’s award-winning documentary series “Frontline with Judy Woodruff” and as White House correspondent at NBC. Woodruff is a founding co-chair of the International Women’s Media Foundation, an organization dedicated to promoting and encouraging women in communication industries worldwide. She is the recent recipient of the Cine Lifetime Achievement award, the Edward R. Murrow Lifetime Achievement Award in Broadcast Journalism/Television, the University of Southern California Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Journalism, and many other awards.

The Executive Advisory Council provides strategic guidance to the AAPB project team and raises awareness of the collection. Council members serve for three years. The newest members of the Council were inducted in February, 2018. Award-winning journalist, author and EAC member Cokie Roberts was recently appointed as Vice Chair. A full list of the members of the Executive Advisory Council can be found at http://americanarchive.org/about-the-american-archive/executive-advisory-council.

The AAPB is a national effort to preserve at-risk public media and provide a central web portal for access to the programming that public stations and producers have created over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized, and the Archive aims to grow by up to 25,000 additional hours per year. The entire collection is available for research on location at WGBH and the Library, and currently more than 30,000 programs are available in the AAPB’s Online Reading Room at americanarchive.org to anyone in the United States.

Digitization Grant Opportunity from Council on Library and Information Resources!

CLIR Recordings at Risk – Fourth Round Opens May 2nd 

Collaborate with American Archive of Public Broadcasting on
Digitization Grant Proposal

Now in its fourth call for the Recordings at Risk grant program, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is accepting applications from collecting institutions for the digital reformatting of audio and audiovisual materials. Generously funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Recordings at Risk is focused on digitizing “at-risk” audio and audiovisual materials of high scholarly value.

For this call, CLIR will award grants of between $10,000 and $50,000 for digital reformatting projects between 3 and 12 months carried out between June 2018 and April 2019.

DEADLINE:  June 29th, 11:59 pm (EDT). Recipients announced September 28th.

ELIGIBLE ACTIVITIES: All audio and audiovisual formats are eligible, though applicants must partner with a qualified external service provider that can perform technically competent and cost-effective digital reformatting for the nominated format(s).

INTERESTED IN WORKING WITH AAPB on a CLIR/Recordings at Risk Preservation project? Our team could provide your project with a letter of support, provide guidance on project planning, and provide feedback on your proposal. Contact Ryn Marchese, Engagement and Use Manager, ryn_marchese (at) wgbh (dot) org. 

FREE WEBINAR: CLIR will hold an informational webinar for prospective applicants on Wednesday, May 16 at 2:00 pm EDT. Please follow this link for more information: https://www.clir.org/recordings-at-risk/applicant-resources.

COMPLETE INFORMATION AND GUIDELINES HERE:  https://www.clir.org/recordings-at-risk/

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About AAPB

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and over 31,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

AAPB Welcomes Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship Spring 2018 Cohort

Following up on our post this past September announcing our IMLS-funded Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF) project, we’re very excited to introduce our first cohort of Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellows!

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PBPF fellows, mentors and project staff at Immersion Week in Boston

The PBPF supports students enrolled in non-specialized graduate programs to pursue digital preservation projects at public broadcasting organizations around the country. The Fellowship is designed to provide graduate students with the opportunity to gain hands-on experiences in the practices of audiovisual preservation; address the need for digitization of at-risk public media materials in underserved areas; and increase audiovisual preservation education capacity in Library and Information Science graduate programs around the country.

Over the spring semester of this year (and summer semester for our second cohort), each fellow will inventory, digitize, and catalog a small collection of audiovisual media; generate technical and preservation metadata; and process the digital files for ingest into the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The fellows will collaborate with a faculty advisor at their university to document their work in a 3-5 page handbook and video demo. The fellowship will also support a digitization station at each university for the use by the fellows and future students enrolled at the universities.

Please welcome the members of our PBPF cohort:

Fellow: Virginia Angles

  • Program: Clayton State University
  • Host Organization: Georgia Public Broadcasting
  • Host Mentor: Tanya Ott, Vice President of Radio and News Content, Georgia Public Broadcasting
  • Faculty Advisor: Josh Kitchens, Director, Master of Archival Studies Program
  • Local Mentor: Kathy Christensen, former VP of News, Archives and Research at CNN

 Virginia Angles is an aspiring archivist with a background in Art History and Chemistry. She is currently pursuing a second masters in Archival Studies with a focus in digital preservation.

Fellow: Rebecca Benson

  • Program: University of Missouri
  • Host Organization: KOPN Community Radio
  • Host Mentor: Jacqueline Casteel, KOPN Community Radio
  • Faculty Advisor: Sarah Buchanan, Assistant Professor, Library and Information Science
  • Local Mentor: James Hone, Digital Archivist, University Libraries, Washington University in St. Louis

Rebecca Benson is a graduate student in the Library and Information Science Program at the University of Missouri, where she works in the Special Collections and Rare Books department of Ellis Library. Her research interests include digital communities, story-telling and reception, and the preservation of ephemeral narratives.

Fellow: Evelyn Cox

  • Program: University of Oklahoma
  • Host Organization: Oklahoma Educational Television Authority
  • Host Mentor: Janette Thornbrue, Vice President of Operations, Oklahoma Educational Television Authority
  • Faculty Advisor: Susan Burke, Interim Director and Associate Professor, School of Library and Information Studies
  • Local Mentor: Lisa Henry, Curator/Archivist, Political Communication Center, Julian P. Kantor Political Commercial Archive

Evelyn Cox is a graduate student enrolled in the Masters of Library and Information Studies (MLIS) Program at the University of Oklahoma.  She obtained her undergraduate degree in English from the University of California, Los Angeles and is a wife and mother of two. She was born on the beautiful island of Guam but currently resides in Oklahoma. Evelyn has been a public school English teacher for over seventeen years. She has earned her National Board Certification in English Language Arts, has been a Great Expectations Instructor, has coached track and field, and has served on multiple grant writing and curriculum development teams. Upon graduation of the MLIS Program, Evelyn seeks to pursue a career in archives where she can combine her love of literature, history, and culture. Through archiving, she plans to take an active role in documenting and preserving history that adds to the cultural identity and awareness of the Chamorro people of Guam.

 Fellow: Dena Schulze

  • Program: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Host Organization: WUNC
  • Host Mentor: Keith Weston, Web Producer and Back Porch Music Host, WUNC
  • Faculty Advisor: Helen Tibbo, Alumni Distinguished Professor, SILS
  • Local Mentor: Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director/AV Conservator, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Dena Schulze  is currently pursuing her Master’s degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Library Science with a concentration in archives and records management. She graduated from North Carolina State University with a bachelor’s in English. She is a major movie buff and that’s what got her started on the road to a/v archiving and preservation. Dena’s dream would be to work in a film archive when she graduates. When she is not working, reading, or watching movies, she is playing with her new puppy, Bodhi who just turned six months old! Dena is very excited about this opportunity and being a part of saving audiovisual material for future generations.

Fellow: Tanya Yule

  • Program: San Jose State University
  • Host Organization: Center for Asian American Media in collaboration with the Bay Area Video Coalition
  • Host Mentor: James Ott, Director of Finance and Administration, Center for Asian-American Media
  • Faculty Advisor: Alyce Scott, Lecturer, School of Information
  • Local Mentor: Jackie Jay, Preservation Technician, Bay Area Video Coalition

Tanya Yule is a current MLIS candidate at San José State University, focusing on archives and photography preservation; she received her BFA in photography from the San Francisco Art Institute, with a background in traditional darkroom methods, and photomechanical printing. Tanya is an intern at the Hoover Institution Archives at Stanford University, and resides in San Francisco with her husband and adorable dog Otto.

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PBPF Fellows at Immersion Week in Boston – from left to right – Tanya Yule, Dena Schulze, Rebecca Benson, Virginia Angles, and Evelyn Cox.

Join Current for “Get with the program!: Shows that shaped public television”

2017 is the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act. Join Current for Get with The Program!: Shows that Shaped Public Television, a series of online events looking at some of the most influential public TV programs of all time. First up: Firing Line, the legendary public affairs program hosted by conservative intellectual William F. Buckley. Watch clips of Firing Line, courtesy of the Hoover Institution Archives, and discuss the impact of this groundbreaking show on American culture and public TV itself. Guests include Heather Hendershot, author of “Open to Debate: How William F. Buckley Put Liberal America on The Firing Line” and former ABC News analyst Jeff Greenfield. This free event is Wednesday, May 24 at 1 pm ET. Reserve your spot here: bit.ly/pba50-firingline.

FiringLine
Image courtesy Hoover Institution Archives

AAPB NDSR Resources Round-up

 

In 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services awarded a generous grant to WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) to develop the AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR). Through this project, we have placed seven graduates of master’s degree programs in digital stewardship residencies at public media organizations around the country.

AAPB NDSR  has already yielded dozens of great resources for the public media and audiovisual preservation community – and the residents aren’t even halfway done yet! As we near the program’s midpoint, we wanted to catch you up on the program so far.

We started off in July 2016 with Immersion Week in Boston, which featured presentations on the history of public media and the AAPB, an overview of physical and digital audiovisual materials, an introduction to audiovisual metadata, and instructional seminars on digital preservation workflows, project management, and professional development. Attendees also participated in a full-day session on “Thinking Like a Computer” and a hands-on command line workshop.

Several sessions from Immersion Week were filmed by
WGBH Forum Network, including:

In August 2016, the residents dispersed to their host stations, and began recording their experiences in a series of thoughtful blog posts, covering topics from home movies to DAM systems to writing in Python.

AAPB NDSR blog posts to date include:

Digital Stewardship at KBOO Community Radio,” Selena Chau (8/9/16)

Metadata Practices at Minnesota Public Radio,” Kate McManus (8/15/16)

NDSA, data wrangling, and KBOO treasures,” Selena Chau (8/30/16)

Minnesota Books and Authors,” Kate McManus (9/23/16)

Snapshot from the IASA Conference: Thoughts on the 2nd Day,” Eddy Colloton (9/29/16)

Who just md5deep-ed and redirected all them checksums to a .csv file? This gal,” Lorena Ramirez-Lopez (10/6/16)

IASA Day 1 and Voice to Text Recognition,” Selena Chau (10/11/16)

IASA – Remixed,” Kate McManus (10/12/16)

Learning GitHub (or, if I can do it, you can too!)” Andrew Weaver (10/13/16)
Home Movie Day,” Eddy Colloton (10/15/16)

Snakes in the Archive,” Adam Lott (10/20/16)

Vietnam, Oral Histories, and the WYSO Archives Digital Humanities Symposium,” Tressa Graves (11/7/16)

Archives in Conversation (A Glimpse into the Minnesota Archives Symposium, 2016),” Kate McManus (11/15/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 1: SpaceSaver,” Lorena Ramirez-Lopez (11/21/16)

Is there something that does it all?: Choosing a metadata management system,” Selena Chau (11/22/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 2: lots of manual labor,” Lorena Ramirez-Lopez (12/20/16)

Just Ask For Help Already!” Eddy Colloton (12/22/16)

August also kicked off our first series of guest webinars, focusing on a range of topics of interest to audiovisual and digital preservation professionals. Most webinars were recorded, and all have slides available.

AAPB NDSR webinars to date include:

Metadata: Storage, Modeling and Quality,” by Kara Van Malssen, Partner & Senior Consultant at AVPreserve

Public Media Production Workflows,” by Leah Weisse, WGBH Digital Archive Manager/Production Archival Compliance Manager (slides)

Imposter Syndrome” by Jen LaBarbera, Head Archivist at Lambda Archives of San Diego, and Dinah Handel, Mass Digitization Coordinator at the NYPL (slides)

Preservation and Access: Digital Audio,” by Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director and AV Conservator at the Southern Folklife Collection (slides)

Troubleshooting Digital Preservation,” by Shira Peltzman, Digital Archivist at UCLA Library (slides)

Studs Terkel Radio Archive: Tips and Tricks for Sharing Great Audio,” by Grace Radkins, Digital Content Librarian at Studs Terkel Radio Library (slides)

From Theory to Action: Digital Preservation Tools and Strategies,” by Danielle Spalenka, Project Director of the Digital POWRR Project (slides)

Our first two resident-hosted webinars (open to the public) will be happening this month! Registration and more info is available here.

The residents also hosted two great panel presentations, first in September at the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives Conference, and in November at the Association of Moving Image Archivists Conference. The AMIA session in particular generated a lot of Twitter chatter; you can see a roundup here.

To keep up with AAPB NDSR blog posts, webinar recordings, and project updates as they happen, follow the AAPB NDSR site at ndsr.americanarchive.org.

AAPB Presentation at IFLA News Media Section Conference

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) News Media Section held a two-day satellite session on  “News, New Roles, & Preservation Advocacy: Moving Libraries Into Action” in Lexington, KY on August 10-12, 2016, hosted by the University of Kentucky Libraries. AAPB Library of Congress project director Alan Gevinson participated remotely with a PowerPoint that surveyed news-related materials in the AAPB collections and discussed the project’s history and goals. 

Alan’s full presentation is now available online, and more presentations from the conference can be viewed and downloaded on the University of Kentucky Libraries website.

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View Alan Gevinson’s presentation here: http://uknowledge.uky.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1000&context=ifla-news-media

Celebrating National Radio Day

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August 20 is National Radio Day!

National Radio Day “is a time to honor one of the most longstanding electronic media and its role in our lives.” To celebrate National Radio Day, we have added more than 500 historic radio programs to the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) Online Reading Room, now accessible from anywhere in the United States. With these new additions, there are now more than 14,000 historic public radio and television programs available for research, educational and informational purposes in the Online Reading Room.

The following radio series are now available for listening online:

Cross Currents from Vermont Public Radio (1978 – 1980)
Cross Currents is a series of recorded lectures and public forums exploring issues of public concern in Vermont.

Hit the Dirt from WERU Community Radio (1990s)
Hit the Dirt is an educational show providing information about a specific aspect of gardening each episode.

Herbal Update from WERU Community Radio (1990s)
Herbal Update is an educational show providing information about the health and nutrition benefits of a specific herb each episode.

The following series were contributed to the AAPB by the University of Maryland’s National Public Broadcasting Archives as part of the National Association of Educational Broadcasters (NAEB) collection. NAEB was established in 1934 from a precursor organization that formed in 1925. In 1951, NAEB established a tape duplication exchange system in Urbana, IL, where programs produced by university radio stations across the country were copied and distributed to member stations, an early networking scheme that influenced the history of later public radio and television systems. The more than 5,500 NAEB radio programs available in the AAPB were produced between 1952 and 1976, and include radio documentaries, coverage of events (hearings, meetings, conferences, and seminars), interviews, debates, and lectures on public affairs topics such as civil rights, foreign affairs, health, politics, education, and broadcasting.

WRVR | Riverside Church
The American People  (1964 – 1965)
Series examines contemporary issues through interviews and personal essays.

Automation and Technological Change (1964)
Documentary series on automation and technological change.

Conversations on Public Relations (1967)
Series of informal half-hour discussions on the nature and ethics of public relations.

WMUK | Western Michigan University
Where Minds Meet (1962 – 1963)
Discussions explore world of speech, conducted by Professors John Freund and Arnold Nelson of Western Michigan University.

WMUB | Miami University
As We See It: Vietnam ‘68 (1968)
Lecture/debate series on aspects of the war in Vietnam and Southeast Asia.

WBFO | SUNY Buffalo
The Only Way to Fly (1968)
Series about the safety aspects of commercial airlines and commercial air transport in the United States.

WUOM | University of Michigan
News in Twentieth Century America (1959)
A series of documentaries on the gathering, writing and dissemination of news in this country today, compiled from interviews with journalists.

Medical Research (1960)
Series about behavioral sciences and medicine.

Behavioral Science Research (1961)
Documentary series on the role of behavioral sciences.

The Challenge of Aging (1961)
Nine segments on aging within the series Behavioral Science Research.

Aspects of Mental Health (1962)
Documentary series about behavioral sciences and medicine research.

Wingspread Conference (1966)
Three programs of the major speeches given at the Wingspread Conference on Educational Radio as a National Resource, held Sept. 26-28, 1966, at Johnson Foundation in Racine, Wisconsin.

The American Town: A Self-Portrait (1967)
Historical documentary series drawn from the recollections of senior citizens in a variety of American towns.

The Truth about Radio (1967)
Interview by Richard Doan with Edmund G. Burrows, chairman of NAEB and manager of WUOM at U. of Michigan. He discusses his station and educational radio and television programming.

Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 (1967)
Panel discussion on Public Broadcasting Act of 1967.

University of Iowa
Russia Revisited (1959)
An informal talk by John Scott, assistant to the publisher of Time, Life and Fortune, recounting his recent trip to the Soviet Union.

Space Science Press Conference (1962)
Press conference at Univ. of Iowa at conclusion of 1962 Space Science Summer Study Program, hosted by National Aeronautic and Space Administration.

University of Florida
Revolution in Latin America (1961)
Documentary series on problems facing Latin America.

University of Denver
Indian Country (1957)
The problems of social adjustment in the attitudes and through the words of the modern American Indian.

Michigan State University
The Tender Twigs (1958)
Discussions of problems affecting today’s youth: mental health, delinquency, crime, social pressures; it considers solutions.

Hold Your Breath (1963)
Series about the impacts of air pollution.

The Music Makers (1965 – 1966)
Distinguished Americans discuss their profession of music, from composition to criticism; the business of music and its current place in our national culture.

San Bernardino Valley College
Politics in the Twentieth Century (1957)
Moderated panel discussion on American political affairs in mid-20th century.

Man is not a Thing (1958)
Discussion of the discoveries and errors of Sigmund Freud and his impact on the American family, politics and religion.

WGUC | University of Cincinnati
Interview with Dr. Albert B. Sabin (1961)
Interview with Dr. Albert B. Sabin, developer of the anti-polio vaccine.

Metaphysical Roots of the Drama (1968)
Lectures given at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion at Cincinnati by Robert Brustein, Dean of the Yale School of Drama.