Announcing the Second Round of Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellows!

WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting is pleased to introduce our second cohort of fellows for the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), a project funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

The PBPF supports students enrolled in non-specialized graduate programs to pursue digital preservation projects at public broadcasting organizations around the country. The Fellowship is designed to provide graduate students with the opportunity to gain hands-on experiences in the practices of audiovisual preservation; address the need for digitization of at-risk public media materials in underserved areas; and increase audiovisual preservation education capacity in Library and Information Science graduate programs around the country.

Over the summer semester of this year, each fellow will inventory, digitize, and catalog a small collection of audiovisual media; generate technical and preservation metadata; and process the digital files for ingest into the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The fellows will collaborate with a faculty advisor at their university to complete a handbook which was drafted by the first Fellows, and develop a training workshop for fellow students in the autumn semester. The fellowship will also support a digitization station at each university for the use by the fellows and future students enrolled at the universities.

Please welcome the members of our Summer 2018 PBPF cohort:

Fellow: Laura Haygood
Program: University of Oklahoma
Host Organization: Oklahoma Educational Television Authority
Host Mentor: Janette Thornbrue, Vice President of Operations, Oklahoma Educational Television Authority
Faculty Advisor:Susan Burke, Interim Director and Associate Professor, School of Library and Information Studies
Local Mentor: Lisa Henry, Curator/Archivist, Political Communication Center, Julian P. Kantor Political Commercial Archive

Laura Haygood is a graduate student in the University of Oklahoma’s Master of Library and Information Studies Program. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in History, and she has a background in instrumental music. She works as a Graduate Research Assistant in the Government Documents collection at OU’s Bizzell Library. Laura has volunteered her time at the Moore-Lindsay Historical House Museum, where she wrote an NEH Preservation Grant, as well as at her local public library and local school library. She will complete her MLIS in May 2019. Laura hopes to use this experience digitizing and preserving audiovisual materials to preserve oral histories in the future. Upon completion of her degree, she plans to seek employment in an archive or academic library. Wherever she ends up, Laura’s overarching professional goal is to connect people with the resources they need.

_DSF9475.jpg

Fellow: Riley Eren Cox
Program: Clayton State University
Host Organization: Georgia Public Broadcasting
Host Mentor: Ellen Reinhardt, Radio Program Director, Georgia Public Broadcasting
Faculty Advisor: Josh Kitchens, Director, Master of Archival Studies Program
Local Mentor: Kathy Christensen, former VP of News, Archives and Research at CNN

Riley graduated from SUNY Fredonia in May 2017 with xir bachelor’s in History, minors in Anthropology and Museum Studies.  After interning at the Chautauqua Institution for a season in 2015, xe decided to pursue a career in archives.  Riley is currently enrolled in Clayton State University’s Master of Archival Studies program.  Xe will be ending xir time of employment at the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archive, and Rare Book Library at Emory University this summer and is excited to see where this fellowship takes xir.

Screen Shot 2018-06-13 at 3.39.38 PM

Fellow: Steve Wilcer
Program: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Host Organization: WUNC
Host Mentor: Keith Weston, Web Producer and Back Porch Music Host, WUNC
Faculty Advisor: Helen Tibbo, Alumni Distinguished Professor, SILS
Local Mentor: Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director/AV Conservator, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Steve Wilcer is a graduate student in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a current focus in academic libraries and archives. He obtained his undergraduate degree in Music Performance and Composition at Western Illinois University in Macomb, Illinois and his first master’s degree in Musicology from the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. His multifaceted background in music, research, and archival resources led him to explore and pursue library science and preservation, especially regarding audiovisual materials. In addition to music, he is also interested in history, literature, film, and electronic gaming.

Wilcer profile photo.jpg

Fellow: Tanya Yule
Program: San Jose State University
Host Organization: Center for Asian American Media in collaboration with the Bay Area Video Coalition
Host Mentor: James Ott, Director of Finance and Administration, Center for Asian-American Media
Faculty Advisor: Alyce Scott, Lecturer, School of Information
Local Mentor: Jackie Jay, Preservation Technician, Bay Area Video Coalition

Tanya Yule is a current MLIS candidate at San José State University, focusing on archives and photography preservation; she received her BFA in photography from the San Francisco Art Institute, with a background in traditional darkroom methods, and photomechanical printing. Tanya is an intern at the Hoover Institution Archives at Stanford University, and resides in San Francisco with her husband and adorable dog Otto.

IMG_0239

Fellow: Eric Saxon
Program: University of Missouri
Host Organization: KOPN Community Radio
Host Mentor: Jacqueline Casteel, KOPN Community Radio
Faculty Advisor: Sarah Buchanan, Assistant Professor, Library and Information Science
Local Mentor: James Hone, Digital Archivist, University Libraries, Washington University in St. Louis

Eric Saxon is a graduate student in the School of Information Science and Learning Technologies at the University of Missouri – Columbia, where he is specializing in archives. His archival research/building interests include anything in danger of being forgotten by the collective memory, a predilection that has led to digital preservation efforts focusing on community centers, an outsider artist, and a WWII Monuments Man.  Eric holds a master’s degree in art history and graduate certificate in digital humanities from the University of Nebraska, and a bachelor’s degree in American studies from Stanford University.

Follow along on their digitization journeys by searching #aapbpf!

Tanya Yule, Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellow at CAAM

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-07 at 4.13.46 PM
Drives loaded up and ready to be sent to the AAPB!!

 

Hello, my name is Tanya Yule and I am one of the five, in the first cohort of the AAPB Public Broadcast Preservation Fellows. Later this month I will be receiving my Masters in Library and Information Science, and an advanced certificate in Digital Assets Management from San Josè State University, with an emphasis in archives and preservation.

When I began the program at SJSU it was with a focus on photography preservation; this was initially a means of utilizing my background in historic photography practices as a way to protect and preserve images for future generations. However, through my work at the Hoover Institution Archives (where I am an intern), I began to fall in love with working in all areas of archives, not just with photographs, and have had the fortunate experience to process incredible collections that range from the Russian Revolution to the Vietnam War, each providing a unique glimpse of someone’s life that I get to describe, organize, and preserve for future generations. When the fellowship was posted, I had a “this was made for me” moment and applied instantly. I have wanted to work with A/V media for quite sometime, and have yet to have the opportunity, until now.

For the last three-months I have been entrenched in material spanning the globe; each item as unique as the next, and giving me more in return than I was prepared for. As I am sitting here trying to tap out a structure and synthesis of what the heck just occurred during the American Archive of Public Broadcasting’s Preservation Fellowship, I am almost overwhelmed with the task.

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-07 at 4.13.34 PM
Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC) Set-up

 

The specialness of this particular fellowship has been based in the opportunity to work with at-risk magnetic media, multiple stakeholders, and learn a very complex technique for capturing. I was fortunate to be able to work with two amazing San Francisco based non-profit organizations that focus on representing arts and culture for underrepresented communities, and have been pillars in what they do for several decades. The collection I worked from came from the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM); CAAM isn’t a traditional archives, but their holdings are significant and represent a wide range of diverse films and documentaries; many which have appeared on local and national PBS stations over the years. The collection contained U-matic, Betacam, and Digibeta tapes, many which haven’t been viewed in decades. The majority of the fellowship was spent over at the Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC), under the watchful (and extremely patient and knowledgeable) eye of Jackie Jay. I was fortunate to be able to have my experience take place with the help of a staff that do this work daily, and could help me capture and learn in the best possible situation. I would like to also give a shout out to Morgan Morel for suffering though my lack of commandline knowledge, he has inspired me to take a python class when this is all over.

What is in a name?

While inventorying the items for the collection at CAAM, I couldn’t help but be curious about some of the titles: Anatomy of a Springroll, Dollar a Day, 10 Cents a Dance, A Village Called Versailles, Sewing Woman, to name a few. Since all of the items are on some form of video (magnetic media) it isn’t as easy as just popping in a deck and taking a peek. While capturing in the dark room with my noise cancelling headphones on, there were moments that I would literally laugh out loud, or cry; the subjects are heavy, as is the perspective and history, my work at the Hoover Archives had helped prepare me for dealing with difficult collections, especially when it comes to visual materials regarding war and atrocities.

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-07 at 4.08.43 PM
Many videos have some form of image error, the above “watermark” is a blemish on an old tape, this can be seen in 1/30 of a second. After capturing I would go back to any discrepancy to investigate further

 

Cleaning, cleaning, and some baking!

I soon learned that the majority of my time was in making sure that the decks and tapes were in tip-top shape before capturing. It is quite amazing how much time is spent cleaning tapes, cleaning the decks, baking tapes (in a really high tech food dehydrator), re-cleaning tapes, and re-cleaning machines, as well as setting up levels and making sure that the item being digitized is as close to the original as possible. The cleaning ensures that there is no transfer of dust or debris from another tape, and that the output from the deck is precise. I am extremely fortunate to have my digitization station at BAVC, as they understand the fundamentals of video preservation and digitization, and helped me learn more about the process then I thought I would be capable of in such a short time.

About the collection

As archivists often times we really don’t know what the collection is “about” until the end, there are usually surprises, and most the times these records don’t come with a “read me” file, so I figured I would save this portion to the end as well. The collection as a whole speaks to the diversity of Asian American life, culture, and experiences; evoking the universal struggle of the human condition. When curating the featured films for the AAPB Special Collections page it was difficult to choose, however, many of the films tell the history of women who have defied odds, been outspoken, or who had sacrificed so much for so little in return, I wanted to put these women upfront and recognize their stories and the ones who decided to tell them.

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-07 at 4.13.20 PM
CAAM Video Archive

 

Having this wonderful opportunity to participate in this fellowship while completing my degree allowed me to expand my technical and historical knowledge base, which I am forever grateful for. I would like to thank SJSU and my wonderful advisor Alyce Scott, James Ott and Davin Agatep at the CAAM for helping me out with the project, the entire preservation crew at BAVC for making sure I didn’t break anything, and of course the AAPB and all of the wonderful WGBH folks that made this fellowship happen.

If you are interested in learning more, here is a Q & A I did with CAAM when I started, you can also follow #aapbpf for photos of the stations and process.

 

 

Written by Tanya Yule, PBPF Spring 2018 Cohort

*******************

About PBPF

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, supports ten graduate student fellows at University of North Carolina, San Jose State University, Clayton State University, University of Missouri, and University of Oklahoma in digitizing at-risk materials at public media organizations around the country. Host sites include the Center for Asian American Media, Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, and KOPN Community Radio. Contents digitized by the fellows will be preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The grant also supports participating universities in developing long-term programs around audiovisual preservation and ongoing partnerships with their local public media stations.

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work.

Virginia Angles, Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellow at GPB

******************

About PBPF

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, supports ten graduate student fellows at University of North Carolina, San Jose State University, Clayton State University, University of Missouri, and University of Oklahoma in digitizing at-risk materials at public media organizations around the country. Host sites include the Center for Asian American Media, Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, and KOPN Community Radio. Contents digitized by the fellows will be preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The grant also supports participating universities in developing long-term programs around audiovisual preservation and ongoing partnerships with their local public media stations.

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work.

Dena Schulze, Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellow at WUNC

My name is Dena Schulze and I am the Public Broadcasting Preservation fellow partnered with WUNC radio station in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I graduate in May from the Archives and Records Management track in the Library Science School at UNC. It has been my privilege to digitize over 170 assets from WUNC radio station that were deemed at risk.  Formats included CDs, cassettes and DAT tapes. Check out some pictures and ramblings about my experience below!

WUNC-FM

Time Travelin’ with WUNC

Every time I put on the headphones, cue up the tape or CD and press record it’s like stepping into a time machine! I had noise reducing headphones that allowed me to be totally immersed in the recordings. Shows at WUNC that I digitized were mostly weekly talk shows about current events and the people, places and things of North Carolina. There were also special programs and recordings that changed up the monotony of talk shows. I enjoyed learning about the state that I have called home for the last fifteen years. Over the course of the fellowship I was able to digitize about 170 assets and learned so much about both the process and the content. Here are a few key words that summarize my experience:

Relevance

There were times when I was listening to a talk show or news segment and if you had changed the names and dates, I would have thought it was a current broadcast. Topics included poverty, politics, abortion, economics, gay marriage, health care, etc. These issues are still constantly in the news and being debated in our country. While I was listening to people talk about these issues 5, 10, 20 years ago it brought a new perspective to the news I was reading about in the present. Will we ever solve these problems or end the debate? Maybe not but I think the continuing discussion is vital and looking back on what has been said before can help the present conversation move forward.

Appreciation

Many of the shows and recordings also featured performing arts and music. Gary Shivers on Jazz played collections of jazz music, including an episode on Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald which I thoroughly enjoyed. The first episode of The Linda Belans show focused on television, specifically the popular shows airing at the time: Friends and Frasier. There was also a collection of short stories recorded by authors including Lee Smith and Haven Kimmel. As someone who loves the arts, I loved this theme throughout the assets and listening to things I would never have heard of otherwise.

Treasures

Cueing up a tape was almost like going on a treasure hunt! The titles of the episode didn’t necessarily tell me what I was going to be listening to for the next hour or so. Sometimes they were pretty simple: “Ray Bradbury” was a conversation with the famous author. Others had one description or name but that was only part of the tape. I was surprised to discover a whole segment on the art of fiddling and another interview featuring actress Amy Adams at the beginning of her career. Some did not even have a description on the tape and that content was a total surprise! Kept me on my toes!

desk-e1524585308344.jpg

North Carolina!

As mentioned above, I have lived in North Carolina for the past fifteen years and felt a strong connection to the shows focusing on the people, places and issues of the state. One show discusses a school being built near where I lived and I had no idea its history and beginning. Another had an interview with Dr. William Friday, who is basically North Carolina royalty and at one time was the president of the University of North Carolina system. Every recording dealt with a person, issue or place concerning the state of North Carolina. It gave me a greater knowledge and appreciation for the state I call home!

Flexibility

This word describes more of the process than the content. Because we were creating the workstation and workflow from the ground up, there were a lot of hiccups to work through. Equipment did not arrive on time or did not work properly, the computer did not read the CDs or programs correctly, miscommunication in emails are just a few examples. I had to be ready to move onto another part of the fellowship while other factors were figured out or fixed. Once the workstation and workflow were set up, everything ran a lot smoother but it takes time to get all the different pieces working together. I found it vital that I had mentors and professionals at my university and at the station to ask for help and I would not have gotten the workstation up and running without them!

I had so much fun immersing myself in recordings from the past and learning some history! I think these recordings are going to be so valuable on the AAPB website and I am so glad I was able to help get them online!

– Written by PBPF Fellow Dena Schulze

*********************

About PBPF

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, supports ten graduate student fellows at University of North Carolina, San Jose State University, Clayton State University, University of Missouri, and University of Oklahoma in digitizing at-risk materials at public media organizations around the country. Host sites include the Center for Asian American Media, Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, and KOPN Community Radio. Contents digitized by the fellows will be preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The grant also supports participating universities in developing long-term programs around audiovisual preservation and ongoing partnerships with their local public media stations.

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work.

Upcoming Webinar: AAPB’s Quality Control Tools and Techniques for Ingesting Digitized Collections

static1.squarespace.jpg

Oklahoma mentor Lisa Henry (left) cleaning a U-matic deck with Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellow Tanya Yule.

This Thursday, February 15th at 8 pm EST, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) staff will host a webinar covering quality control tools and technologies used when ingesting digitized collections into the AAPB archive, including MDQC, MediaConch, Sonic Visualizer, and QCTools.

The public is welcome to join for the first half hour. The last half hour will be limited to Q&A with our Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellows, who are just now beginning the process of digitizing at-risk public broadcasting collections to be preserved in the AAPB.

Webinar URL: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/psv1042lp222/

*******************************

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work: digitized content preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting from our collaborating host organizations WUNCKOPNOklahoma Educational Television AuthorityGeorgia Public Broadcasting, and the Center for Asian American Media as well as documentation created to support ongoing audio and video preservation education at the University of MissouriUniversity of OklahomaClayton State UniversityUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and San Jose State University.

 

AAPB Welcomes Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship Spring 2018 Cohort

Following up on our post this past September announcing our IMLS-funded Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF) project, we’re very excited to introduce our first cohort of Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellows!

GetFileAttachment-2.jpeg

PBPF fellows, mentors and project staff at Immersion Week in Boston

The PBPF supports students enrolled in non-specialized graduate programs to pursue digital preservation projects at public broadcasting organizations around the country. The Fellowship is designed to provide graduate students with the opportunity to gain hands-on experiences in the practices of audiovisual preservation; address the need for digitization of at-risk public media materials in underserved areas; and increase audiovisual preservation education capacity in Library and Information Science graduate programs around the country.

Over the spring semester of this year (and summer semester for our second cohort), each fellow will inventory, digitize, and catalog a small collection of audiovisual media; generate technical and preservation metadata; and process the digital files for ingest into the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The fellows will collaborate with a faculty advisor at their university to document their work in a 3-5 page handbook and video demo. The fellowship will also support a digitization station at each university for the use by the fellows and future students enrolled at the universities.

Please welcome the members of our PBPF cohort:

Fellow: Virginia Angles

  • Program: Clayton State University
  • Host Organization: Georgia Public Broadcasting
  • Host Mentor: Tanya Ott, Vice President of Radio and News Content, Georgia Public Broadcasting
  • Faculty Advisor: Josh Kitchens, Director, Master of Archival Studies Program
  • Local Mentor: Kathy Christensen, former VP of News, Archives and Research at CNN

 Virginia Angles is an aspiring archivist with a background in Art History and Chemistry. She is currently pursuing a second masters in Archival Studies with a focus in digital preservation.

Fellow: Rebecca Benson

  • Program: University of Missouri
  • Host Organization: KOPN Community Radio
  • Host Mentor: Jacqueline Casteel, KOPN Community Radio
  • Faculty Advisor: Sarah Buchanan, Assistant Professor, Library and Information Science
  • Local Mentor: James Hone, Digital Archivist, University Libraries, Washington University in St. Louis

Rebecca Benson is a graduate student in the Library and Information Science Program at the University of Missouri, where she works in the Special Collections and Rare Books department of Ellis Library. Her research interests include digital communities, story-telling and reception, and the preservation of ephemeral narratives.

Fellow: Evelyn Cox

  • Program: University of Oklahoma
  • Host Organization: Oklahoma Educational Television Authority
  • Host Mentor: Janette Thornbrue, Vice President of Operations, Oklahoma Educational Television Authority
  • Faculty Advisor: Susan Burke, Interim Director and Associate Professor, School of Library and Information Studies
  • Local Mentor: Lisa Henry, Curator/Archivist, Political Communication Center, Julian P. Kantor Political Commercial Archive

Evelyn Cox is a graduate student enrolled in the Masters of Library and Information Studies (MLIS) Program at the University of Oklahoma.  She obtained her undergraduate degree in English from the University of California, Los Angeles and is a wife and mother of two. She was born on the beautiful island of Guam but currently resides in Oklahoma. Evelyn has been a public school English teacher for over seventeen years. She has earned her National Board Certification in English Language Arts, has been a Great Expectations Instructor, has coached track and field, and has served on multiple grant writing and curriculum development teams. Upon graduation of the MLIS Program, Evelyn seeks to pursue a career in archives where she can combine her love of literature, history, and culture. Through archiving, she plans to take an active role in documenting and preserving history that adds to the cultural identity and awareness of the Chamorro people of Guam.

 Fellow: Dena Schulze

  • Program: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Host Organization: WUNC
  • Host Mentor: Keith Weston, Web Producer and Back Porch Music Host, WUNC
  • Faculty Advisor: Helen Tibbo, Alumni Distinguished Professor, SILS
  • Local Mentor: Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director/AV Conservator, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Dena Schulze  is currently pursuing her Master’s degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Library Science with a concentration in archives and records management. She graduated from North Carolina State University with a bachelor’s in English. She is a major movie buff and that’s what got her started on the road to a/v archiving and preservation. Dena’s dream would be to work in a film archive when she graduates. When she is not working, reading, or watching movies, she is playing with her new puppy, Bodhi who just turned six months old! Dena is very excited about this opportunity and being a part of saving audiovisual material for future generations.

Fellow: Tanya Yule

  • Program: San Jose State University
  • Host Organization: Center for Asian American Media in collaboration with the Bay Area Video Coalition
  • Host Mentor: James Ott, Director of Finance and Administration, Center for Asian-American Media
  • Faculty Advisor: Alyce Scott, Lecturer, School of Information
  • Local Mentor: Jackie Jay, Preservation Technician, Bay Area Video Coalition

Tanya Yule is a current MLIS candidate at San José State University, focusing on archives and photography preservation; she received her BFA in photography from the San Francisco Art Institute, with a background in traditional darkroom methods, and photomechanical printing. Tanya is an intern at the Hoover Institution Archives at Stanford University, and resides in San Francisco with her husband and adorable dog Otto.

GetFileAttachment.jpeg

PBPF Fellows at Immersion Week in Boston – from left to right – Tanya Yule, Dena Schulze, Rebecca Benson, Virginia Angles, and Evelyn Cox.

Announcing ROLL THE CREDITS: Classifying and Transcribing Text with Zooniverse

AAPB_RollTheCredits

Today we’re launching ROLL THE CREDITS, a new Zooniverse project to engage the public in helping us catalog unseen content in the AAPB archive. Zooniverse is the “world’s largest and most popular platform for people-powered research.” Zooniverse volunteers (like you!) are helping the AAPB in classifying and transcribing the text from extracted frames of uncataloged public television programs, providing us with information we can plug directly into our catalog, closing the gap on our sparsely described collection of nearly 50,000 hours of television and radio.

RolltheCredits.png

Example frame from ROLL THE CREDITS

The American people have made a huge investment in public radio and television over many decades. The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) works to ensure that this rich source for American political, social, and cultural history and creativity is saved and made available once again to future generations.

The improved catalog records will have verified titles, dates, credits, and copyright statements. With the updated, verified information we will be able to make informed decisions about the development of our archive, as well as provide access to corrected versions of transcripts available for anyone to search free of charge at americanarchive.org.

In conjunction with our speech-to-text transcripts from FIX IT, a game that asks users to correct and validate the transcripts one phrase at a time, ROLL THE CREDITS helps us fulfill our mission of preserving and making accessible historic content created by the public media, saving at-risk media before the contents are lost to prosperity.

Thanks for supporting AAPB’s mission! Know someone who might be interested? Feel free to share with the other transcribers and public media fans in your life!

Upcoming Webinar: Building AAPB Participation into Digitization Grant Proposals

cropped-aapb_logo_color_1line7.png

Building AAPB Participation into Digitization Grant Proposals: Requirements, Recommendations and Workflows

Tuesday, December 12, 2017
12:00pm ET

Webinar Registration form: https://goo.gl/forms/lWWU5GgFkv09bNFi2
Direct meeting URL: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/aapb_grant-proposals-1/

Curious about getting involved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB)?

Seeking information about the workflows and requirements for contributing digitized content and/or metadata to the AAPB?

Writing a grant proposal and want to explore collaborating with the AAPB to preserve copies of your digitized collections and/or provide an access point to your collections through the AAPB metadata portal?

Then this webinar is for you!

On Tuesday, December 12, 2017 at 12:00pm ET, the AAPB will host a webinar focused on grant writing for digitization and subsequent contribution of digital files and metadata to the AAPB.

By the end of this webinar, participants will gain an understanding of:

  • AAPB’s background and infrastructure,
  • how contributing to the AAPB could benefit your collection
  • steps to becoming an AAPB contributor,
  • metadata and digital file format requirements and recommendations,
  • delivery procedures, and
  • other workflows and considerations for contributing digital files and/or metadata to the AAPB.
  • the value of your collection as part of a national collection and how to express that in a proposal

Attendees will also receive advice on how to incorporate AAPB contribution into their CLIR Recordings at Risk (applications due February 9, 2018!), CLIR Digitizing Hidden Collections, or other grant proposal timelines and work plans.

Fill out this brief form to receive info about future webinars and to receive a webinar meeting invitation sent to your calendar: https://goo.gl/forms/lWWU5GgFkv09bNFi2

Anyone can join the webinar at this URL: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/aapb_grant-proposals-1/

This webinar and future AAPB webinars are generously funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 60 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at the Library of Congress and WGBH, and almost 25,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

Introducing an audio labeling toolkit

In 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) awarded WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting a grant to address the challenges faced by many libraries and archives trying to provide better access to their media collections through online discoverability. Through a collaboration with Pop Up Archive and HiPSTAS at the University of Texas at Austin, our project has supported the creation of speech-to-transcripts for the initial 40,000 hours of historic public broadcasting preserved in the AAPB, the launch of a free open-source speech-to-text tool, and FIX IT, a game that allows the public to help correct our transcripts.

Now, our colleagues at HiPSTAS are debuting a new machine learning toolkit and DIY techniques for labeling speakers in “unheard” audio — audio that is not documented in a machine-generated transcript. The toolkit was developed through a massive effort using machine learning to identify notable speakers’ voices (such as Martin Luther King, Jr. and John F. Kennedy) from within the AAPB’s 40,000 hour collection of historic public broadcasting content.

This effort has vast potential for archivists, researchers, and other organizations seeking to discover and make accessible sound at scale — sound that otherwise would require a human to listen and identify in every digital file.

Read more about the audio labeling toolkit here, and stay tuned for more posts in this series.

Audio_Labeler_The_World

AAPB Debuts New Online Exhibit “Structuring the News: The Magazine Format in Public Media”

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) has launched a new digital exhibit about newsmagazines, a popular form of news presentation spanning five decades of radio and television broadcasting. Departing from mainstream examples such as 60 Minutes and All Things Considered, the exhibit brings together unique programs produced by independent stations from across the country for the first time as a unified collection. The newsmagazines showcased in “Structuring the News” cover topics from labor strikes to a day in the life of an air traffic controller, and emphasize conversations and voices often overlooked by network news shows.

“Structuring the News” is curated by Digital Exhibits Intern Alejandra Dean, and highlights 42 definitive examples representing both metropolitan producers and smaller, regional studios. Many of the shows in the exhibit prioritize local issues and communities, providing a window into American daily life from 1976-2016. In addition to defining the format, the exhibit looks at important precursors during the 1960s that experimented with news reporting.

“Structuring the News” can be accessed online at http://americanarchive.org/exhibits/newsmagazines.

To celebrate the launch of “Structuring the News: The Magazine Format in Public Media”, the exhibit’s curator, Alejandra Dean, AAPB Project Manager Casey Davis Kaufman, and Mark Williams, Professor of Film and Media Studies at Dartmouth College, will be discussing newsmagazines in a Facebook Live event at 12pm EDT on Thursday, July 6th. Don’t miss this inside look at over fifty years of broadcast newsmagazines, and the chance to ask questions about the exhibit! To watch, head to WGBH’s Facebook page at 12pm EDT on July 6th.