Digitization Grant Opportunity from Council on Library and Information Resources!

CLIR Recordings at Risk – Fourth Round Opens May 2nd 

Collaborate with American Archive of Public Broadcasting on
Digitization Grant Proposal

Now in its fourth call for the Recordings at Risk grant program, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is accepting applications from collecting institutions for the digital reformatting of audio and audiovisual materials. Generously funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Recordings at Risk is focused on digitizing “at-risk” audio and audiovisual materials of high scholarly value.

For this call, CLIR will award grants of between $10,000 and $50,000 for digital reformatting projects between 3 and 12 months carried out between June 2018 and April 2019.

DEADLINE:  June 29th, 11:59 pm (EDT). Recipients announced September 28th.

ELIGIBLE ACTIVITIES: All audio and audiovisual formats are eligible, though applicants must partner with a qualified external service provider that can perform technically competent and cost-effective digital reformatting for the nominated format(s).

INTERESTED IN WORKING WITH AAPB on a CLIR/Recordings at Risk Preservation project? Our team could provide your project with a letter of support, provide guidance on project planning, and provide feedback on your proposal. Contact Ryn Marchese, Engagement and Use Manager, ryn_marchese (at) wgbh (dot) org. 

FREE WEBINAR: CLIR will hold an informational webinar for prospective applicants on Wednesday, May 16 at 2:00 pm EDT. Please follow this link for more information: https://www.clir.org/recordings-at-risk/applicant-resources.

COMPLETE INFORMATION AND GUIDELINES HERE:  https://www.clir.org/recordings-at-risk/

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About AAPB

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and over 31,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

Dena Schulze, Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellow at WUNC

My name is Dena Schulze and I am the Public Broadcasting Preservation fellow partnered with WUNC radio station in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I graduate in May from the Archives and Records Management track in the Library Science School at UNC. It has been my privilege to digitize over 170 assets from WUNC radio station that were deemed at risk.  Formats included CDs, cassettes and DAT tapes. Check out some pictures and ramblings about my experience below!

WUNC-FM

Time Travelin’ with WUNC

Every time I put on the headphones, cue up the tape or CD and press record it’s like stepping into a time machine! I had noise reducing headphones that allowed me to be totally immersed in the recordings. Shows at WUNC that I digitized were mostly weekly talk shows about current events and the people, places and things of North Carolina. There were also special programs and recordings that changed up the monotony of talk shows. I enjoyed learning about the state that I have called home for the last fifteen years. Over the course of the fellowship I was able to digitize about 170 assets and learned so much about both the process and the content. Here are a few key words that summarize my experience:

Relevance

There were times when I was listening to a talk show or news segment and if you had changed the names and dates, I would have thought it was a current broadcast. Topics included poverty, politics, abortion, economics, gay marriage, health care, etc. These issues are still constantly in the news and being debated in our country. While I was listening to people talk about these issues 5, 10, 20 years ago it brought a new perspective to the news I was reading about in the present. Will we ever solve these problems or end the debate? Maybe not but I think the continuing discussion is vital and looking back on what has been said before can help the present conversation move forward.

Appreciation

Many of the shows and recordings also featured performing arts and music. Gary Shivers on Jazz played collections of jazz music, including an episode on Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald which I thoroughly enjoyed. The first episode of The Linda Belans show focused on television, specifically the popular shows airing at the time: Friends and Frasier. There was also a collection of short stories recorded by authors including Lee Smith and Haven Kimmel. As someone who loves the arts, I loved this theme throughout the assets and listening to things I would never have heard of otherwise.

Treasures

Cueing up a tape was almost like going on a treasure hunt! The titles of the episode didn’t necessarily tell me what I was going to be listening to for the next hour or so. Sometimes they were pretty simple: “Ray Bradbury” was a conversation with the famous author. Others had one description or name but that was only part of the tape. I was surprised to discover a whole segment on the art of fiddling and another interview featuring actress Amy Adams at the beginning of her career. Some did not even have a description on the tape and that content was a total surprise! Kept me on my toes!

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North Carolina!

As mentioned above, I have lived in North Carolina for the past fifteen years and felt a strong connection to the shows focusing on the people, places and issues of the state. One show discusses a school being built near where I lived and I had no idea its history and beginning. Another had an interview with Dr. William Friday, who is basically North Carolina royalty and at one time was the president of the University of North Carolina system. Every recording dealt with a person, issue or place concerning the state of North Carolina. It gave me a greater knowledge and appreciation for the state I call home!

Flexibility

This word describes more of the process than the content. Because we were creating the workstation and workflow from the ground up, there were a lot of hiccups to work through. Equipment did not arrive on time or did not work properly, the computer did not read the CDs or programs correctly, miscommunication in emails are just a few examples. I had to be ready to move onto another part of the fellowship while other factors were figured out or fixed. Once the workstation and workflow were set up, everything ran a lot smoother but it takes time to get all the different pieces working together. I found it vital that I had mentors and professionals at my university and at the station to ask for help and I would not have gotten the workstation up and running without them!

I had so much fun immersing myself in recordings from the past and learning some history! I think these recordings are going to be so valuable on the AAPB website and I am so glad I was able to help get them online!

– Written by PBPF Fellow Dena Schulze

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About PBPF

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, supports ten graduate student fellows at University of North Carolina, San Jose State University, Clayton State University, University of Missouri, and University of Oklahoma in digitizing at-risk materials at public media organizations around the country. Host sites include the Center for Asian American Media, Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, and KOPN Community Radio. Contents digitized by the fellows will be preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The grant also supports participating universities in developing long-term programs around audiovisual preservation and ongoing partnerships with their local public media stations.

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work.

The National Association of Educational Broadcasters (NAEB) Collection Now Available on AAPB

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The National Association of Educational Broadcasters (NAEB) Collection, now available on the AAPB website, consists of more than 5,500 radio programs from the 1950s and 1960s, created by over 100 NAEB member stations. The collection includes radio documentaries, coverage of events (hearings, meetings, conferences, and seminars), interviews, debates, and lectures on public affairs topics such as civil rights, foreign affairs, health, politics, education, and broadcasting.

These broadcasts, mostly stemming from university and public school-run radio stations, provide an in-depth look at the engagements and events of American history, as they were broadcast to and received by the general public in the twentieth century. Interview subjects and/or program participants feature a “who’s who” of mid-20th century public figures, including Hubert Humphrey, Betty Shabazz, Robert Frost, Frank Lloyd Wright, Alistair Cooke, Dr. Benjamin Spock, Margaret Mead, Studs Terkel, Dr. Albert Schweitzer, Marshall McLuhan, and Aldous Huxley. The collection also contains a notably large percentage of local content and voices, from a WDET Detroit series about local civil defense plans and policies called “Prepare for Survival,” to a series entitled “Document: Deep South,” a documentary series produced by WOUA at the University of Alabama depicting the increasing importance of the South in the economic development of the United States, to a show entitled “Search for Mental Health,” a series of talks about advances in psychiatry from the University of Chicago.

The NAEB was established in 1934 from a precursor organization, the Association of College and University Broadcasting Stations, that formed in 1925. The mission of the NAEB was to use communications technology for education and social purposes. It was an extremely successful and effective trade organization that, throughout its 60 years of existence, ushered in or helped to enable major changes in early educational broadcasting policy. In 1951, NAEB established a tape duplication exchange system in Urbana, IL, where programs produced by university radio stations across the country were copied and distributed to member stations, an early networking scheme that influenced the history of later public radio and television systems. The forerunner of CPB and its arms, NPR and PBS, the NAEB served as the primary organizer, developer, and distributor for noncommercial broadcast production and analysis between 1925 and 1981.

The NAEB Collection was contributed to the AAPB by the University of Maryland’s National Public Broadcasting Archives. The paper records of the NAEB are housed at University of Maryland and additional related materials are located at the Wisconsin Historical Society.

Access the collection here: http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/naeb

Special thanks to Stephanie Sapienza for her contributions to the curation of this collection.

AAPB Debuts New Exhibit “Protecting Places: Historic Preservation and Public Broadcasting”

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Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) has launched a new digital exhibit titled “Protecting Places: Historic Preservation and Public Broadcasting.” Historic preservation is more than just saving old buildings from the bulldozer. Histories can be shared or silenced depending upon the preservation of places that represent a larger story. AAPB Digital Exhibits Intern Kara Zelasko uncovers how people have used public broadcasting to advocate, negotiate, or protest historic preservation efforts across America. Kara is currently a public history graduate student at Northeastern University interested in exploring history as a tool for placemaking and community engagement.

Using a diverse range of public radio and television content from 1950 – 2012, more than 100 digitized, historic public broadcasting programs, local news reports, radio call-in shows, and interviews document the important relationship historic structures have fostered between people and their neighborhoods. These visual and audio records digitized and preserved by the AAPB reveal the ways people have used or rejected preservation in the ever-changing American landscape to share local and national histories, illuminating the ways Americans have envisioned their communities through buildings and sites that connect past to present.

“Protecting Places: Historic Preservation and Public Broadcasting” is accessible online at http://americanarchive.org/exhibits/historic-preservation.

Listen to sample recordings from the exhibit…

Bill Inge, host of WILL’s radio call-in broadcast “Focus,” asks Richard Moe “how do we decide what buildings are worth saving?” Moe, then president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, answers that the decision essentially lies within the community and what will best serve its current and future needs. This answer underlines the struggle historic preservationists encounter between saving a building to share the past while also serving the community of the present. Listen to the full episode here.

This segment from New Jersey Nightly News explores the Victorian buildings that have come to define Cape May’s community. The interview reveals how Cape May, like many other places, have come to recognize the economic incentive in preserving buildings and landscapes that speak to the neighborhood’s character. Watch the full segment here.

This interview from South Carolina Educational Television’s “Connections” discusses the disappearing cabins of enslaved people in South Carolina.  Historic preservation can be a way to uncover marginalized stories that have been previously ignored. This record and others found in the exhibit reveal how histories have been both erased and uncovered in the American landscape over time. Watch the entire episode here.

Voegeli and Setziol Radio Collections Added to the Online Reading Room

In the past few months, we’ve added several new radio collections to our Online Reading Room!

The Donald Voegeli collection preserves the music and memory of Don Voegeli, who wrote the theme music for All Things Considered on NPR, along with providing many other contributions to public radio over the course of a long and impressive career.

Variations on the  All Things Considered theme make up just a fraction of the Don Voegeli collection. There’s also plenty of Voegeli’s other work to explore, from musical compositions in the vein of the ATC theme like Swiss Clock Maker to catchy educational jingles like Math Song (“you bisect an angle by using a ruler and compass / you bisect a compass by using a good sharp axe”)

Donald Voegeli’s son Jim Voegeli, a radio producer in his own right, has also contributed four audio documentaries of his own as a separate collection. “Speaking of Wilderness,” Jim’s first documentary on the importance of the conservation of wild places, aired on NPR when he was only 16.  Jim’s piece “Remembering Aldo Leopold,” a radio documentary essay on the life and legacy of the visionary conservationist and writer, went on to win an Ohio State Award.

Finally, for more award-winning environmental journalism, check out our newest collection of works by Ilsa Setziol, longtime environmental reporter for KPCC. Among other honors, Setziol has been recognized for Outstanding Beat Reporting in Radio by the Society of Environmental Journalists for pieces like this 2003 report on the environmental aftermath of fires in San Bernardino County, “Fire Recovery, Part 1.”

The archive of Setziol’s work for KPCC offers an invaluable record of environmental concerns and activism from the past 20 years, from reports on the projected devastating impact of global warming in California to stories of activists like Josh Quigley, who spent months sitting in an oak tree to try and save it from being cut down.

Browse the collections to listen to hundreds more great radio pieces:

Donald Voegeli
James F. Voegeli
KPCC (Ilsa Setziol)

Archival discoveries and collaboration at Minnesota Public Radio

The following blog post was written by Margaret Bresnahan from Minnesota Public Radio.

I’m writing to share the next installment in the American Archive success story. Thanks to the cataloging done during the American Archive inventory project, Minnesota Public Radio was able to identify about 900 MPR News stories covering the Hmong settlement in Minnesota, with recordings dating from 1975 to present day. This discovery led to a collaboration with the Minnesota Historical Society (MNHS), informing an exhibition/celebration that launches this month (March 2015), and it led to new broadcasts from the MPR News Room.

Marking the 40th anniversary of the first large-scale arrival of Hmong people in Minnesota, MPR News recently launched a Hmong collection page and broadcast a few news stories–all using archive recordings to tell the story of Hmong-Minnesotans. Two of our main collaborators in the News Room plan on continuing the coverage throughout the year, bringing more archive recordings on air and online. This is a wonderful example of the power of access. The inventory made it clear that these recordings existed and enabled this great use of archive material to tell a contemporary, ongoing story.

 Here are some links to the archive usage, and more are to come: