Upcoming Webinar: Building AAPB Participation into Digitization Grant Proposals

Building AAPB Participation into Digitization Grant Proposals: Requirements, Recommendations and Workflows

Tuesday, December 12, 2017
12:00pm ET

Webinar Registration form: https://goo.gl/forms/lWWU5GgFkv09bNFi2
Direct meeting URL: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/aapb_grant-proposals-1/

Curious about getting involved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB)?

Seeking information about the workflows and requirements for contributing digitized content and/or metadata to the AAPB?

Writing a grant proposal and want to explore collaborating with the AAPB to preserve copies of your digitized collections and/or provide an access point to your collections through the AAPB metadata portal?

Then this webinar is for you!

On Tuesday, December 12, 2017 at 12:00pm ET, the AAPB will host a webinar focused on grant writing for digitization and subsequent contribution of digital files and metadata to the AAPB.

By the end of this webinar, participants will gain an understanding of:

  • AAPB’s background and infrastructure,
  • how contributing to the AAPB could benefit your collection
  • steps to becoming an AAPB contributor,
  • metadata and digital file format requirements and recommendations,
  • delivery procedures, and
  • other workflows and considerations for contributing digital files and/or metadata to the AAPB.
  • the value of your collection as part of a national collection and how to express that in a proposal

Attendees will also receive advice on how to incorporate AAPB contribution into their CLIR Recordings at Risk (applications due February 9, 2018!), CLIR Digitizing Hidden Collections, or other grant proposal timelines and work plans.

Fill out this brief form to receive info about future webinars and to receive a webinar meeting invitation sent to your calendar: https://goo.gl/forms/lWWU5GgFkv09bNFi2

Anyone can join the webinar at this URL: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/aapb_grant-proposals-1/

This webinar and future AAPB webinars are generously funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 60 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at the Library of Congress and WGBH, and almost 25,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

Report of the AAPB Rights Meeting

Last month, staff from the Library of Congress Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division (MBRS) and Office of the General Counsel (OGC) met in Boston with WGBH Media Library and Archives staff and counsel from WGBH Business and Legal Affairs, as well as Representatives from the Cyberlaw Clinic and Fellows community at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society for a two-day brainstorming session to strategize regarding rights clearance for the American Archive for Public Broadcasting (AAPB). The AAPB Project Team anticipates that the outcomes of the meeting can serve as a model of how digital audiovisual archival rights can be managed.

Planning is at a very early stage, and will evolve based upon both technological and legal constraints.  The early sketch is that AAPB would employ several interlocking layers of rights clearance: obtaining permission from originating stations and rights holders; identifying public domain materials; and using copyright law exemptions including fair use, the library and archive exemptions, and existing provisions unique to public television and to the Library.

The preliminary access model is that there would be three basic levels of access to the American Archive.  First would be the open web, which would include public domain materials and materials for which the Archive (through WGBH and the Library) has obtained full permission.  Some materials at this level would be downloadable; most would be streamed.  The metadata for the entire AAPB would be in this level.

The second level would be an online virtual reading room, restricted to educational and scholarly uses.  Users would be required to register on the AAPB website, and would be presented with terms and conditions, including the use restriction and the requirement that the user comply with copyright and other legal restrictions.  This level would include materials that are permissioned for this reduced access.  It would also include materials that the legal team has determined may prudently be presented for educational and scholarly purposes under fair use and other legal doctrines.  For example, many historic news broadcasts may fall into this category. Materials on this level would be streaming only.

A third level would be materials that would be available only on Library and WGBH premises.  This is the most restricted level, and materials would likely migrate to less restricted levels as they are analyzed and as permissions are obtained.

The AAPB Project Team is excited to begin implementing this model through rights clearances and developing the technological infrastructure over the next several months. We will continue to provide updates as the work moves forward.

PBS Annual Meeting Presentation & Takeaways

The American Archive team from WGBH presented at the PBS Annual Meeting in San Francisco. We had the wonderful opportunity to meet many of our station collaborators in person and gather tremendously useful feedback from participants. Many thanks to all of those who attended the session and reception, as well as those who took the time to meet with us at other moments during the conference. Additionally, we are sincerely grateful to our co-presenters, Sandy Schonning from KQED and Laura Sampson from Rocky Mountain PBS’ Stations Archived Memories program.

Below we’ve provided our Annual Meeting slideshow, divided into three sections: 1) history and progress of the American Archive, 2) stories from stations, and 3) discussion. During the discussion section, we asked a series of questions, and in this version of the presentation you will find a summary of the answers. If your organization is participating in the American Archive, please feel free to comment on this post with your answers to these questions (or questions about these questions!).

Feel free to email any of our session presenters:

Karen Cariani, Director
WGBH Media Library & Archives
karen_cariani [at] wgbh [dot] org

Casey E. Davis, Project Manager, American Archive
WGBH Media Library & Archives
casey_davis [at] wgbh [dot] org

Laura Sampson, Rocky Mountain PBS
Stations Archived Memories 

laurasampson [at] me [dot] com

Sandy Schonning, KQED
sschonning [at] kqed [dot] org

♥ Happy Valentine’s Day from the American Archive and Chicago Public Media! ♥

Happy Valentine’s Day! Love is in the air today as we share with you a clip from the American Archive, contributed by Chicago Public Media (WBEZ), featuring Little Milton singing “I Want to Love You” at the Chicago Blues Festival in June of 1987.


“The Chicago Blues Festival has been a Chicago institution for over 30 years and has grown to hold the title of the largest free blues festival in the world. Held every summer in Chicago’s Grant Park, the festival has consistently featured blues legends alongside the future stars of the genre and, despite Chicago’s embarrassment of riches when it comes to blues artists, features performers from around the world. If they’ve sung the blues, chances are they’ve appeared at the festival,” says Chicago Public Media’s Director of Studio and Broadcast Operations Adam Yoffe. “WBEZ has been lucky enough to capture some of the earliest years of the festival to tape, and are excited to bring them to the archive in the coming months.”

Chicago Public Media’s music archives feature interviews and live performances with many of the most revered jazz and blues figures in the country and includes hundreds of reels that date from the mid-1980s to the early ’90s, such as performances of jazz greats Etta James and Dizzy Gillespie and blues legends Lonnie Brooks and Koko Taylor.

This program we’re sharing today was originally recorded on 1/4″ audio tape and was digitized in the first 40,000 hours of the American Archive collection, which are now being preserved at the Library of Congress.

This American Life showcased in today's Google Doodle
This American Life showcased in today’s Google Doodle

And while your in the Valentine’s Day spirit, you should check out today’s Google Doodle. WBEZ’s This American Life has collaborated with Google on today’s Doodle, featuring candy hearts and Valentine’s Day-themed stories produced by This American Life.

**Audio clip courtesy Chicago Public Media (WBEZ). All rights reserved.
Thanks to American Archive intern Bill Nehring for editing today’s clip.
This post was written by Casey E. Davis, Project Manager for the AAPB at WGBH