40 Years, 40 Films, 40 Weeks: In the Light of Reverence

This week’s award-winning Vision Maker Media film looks at the conflicts that surround America’s sacred spaces.

The Colorado Plateau in the Southwest, Mount Shasta in California, and Devil’s Tower in Wyoming are all holy sites to tribal nations — but they’re also rich in natural resources, not to mention beloved by recreational users such as mountain climbers and New Age practitioners. “In the Light of Reverence” delves into the culture clashes that play out along these embattled landscapes.

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Watch “In the Light of Reverence” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

World Health Day

Over the years, public media has had a lot to say about health — not surprising, given that few issues are more universally important to the American public. For World Health Day, we’re highlighting some health-related programs and series available in the Online Reading Room.

Our collection goes back to 1947 and the last-ever outbreak of smallpox in America, documented by WNYC in “MUNI: Smallpox in New York City” and “MUNI: Dr. Israel Weinstein Smallpox Message.” A decade later, WNYC brought in a more high-profile guest to make the pitch for public health in “MUNI: Eleanor Roosevelt as a Disk Jockey for WNYC,” a musical fundraiser for the March of Dimes.

Public media has often reported from the forefront of medical science. From 1960-1961, WUOM and the National Association of Educational Broadcasters ran a series of programs “developed from interviews with men and women who have the too often unglamorous job of basic research.” Covering topics from “Epilepsy and Multiple Sclerosis” to “Emotional Health and Aging” the series provided a thoughtful look at medical issues of the time. For a more modern take, WEDU’s “Smart Health” series from 2008 offered upbeat stories about medical advances in bite-sized magazine segments.

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Not all coverage of America’s healthcare community has been so positive. Pacifica Radio Archives’ “People’s Health and Fascism,” recorded at the Black Panther Party’s United Front Against Fascism conference, begins “We’ve seen how the medical community in this country is the embodiment of all that is evil!” While that’s an opinion on the extreme end of the spectrum, public media has frequently debated hot-button healthcare issues and given voice to America’s fears and worries about their health care system.

Concerns about pharmaceuticals and drug abuse appear in programs such as “The Benefits, Risks, and Costs of Prescription Drugs” (WILL’s Focus) and “The Medicine Cabinet Addict” (WUED’s Woman.) Programs like “Foreign Immigrants and US Health Care” (WGBH’s Forum Network) and “What Are the Healthcare Problems in the African American Community?” (WHUT’s Evening Exchange) provide voices to those who frequently slip through the cracks of the healthcare system. And, of course, there’s the longstanding and ongoing debate on health care reform, discussed in practically every state in the union: “We the People: Health Care Reform on Trial,” from Wisconsin Public Television; “Health Care Reform: A Louisiana Perspective” from Louisiana Public Broadcasting; “Civic Dialogue: Health Care Crisis” from KUED; and “Health of the Nation: Coverage for All Americans” from WGBH Forum Network, just to name a few.

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For those who want a break from the stresses and messes of western medicine, public media has you covered on DIY options too: WERU’s “Herbal Update” provides short overviews on the health and nutrition benefits of specific herbs and plants (though only the ones legal in Maine in the 1990s.)

And don’t forget to check out this week’s featured Vision Maker Media film, “The Creek Runs Red,” which portrays the conflict that arises when the place you call home becomes deeply hazardous to your health.

Visit our site to browse through all 1100+ currently available health-related items in the AAPB.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: The Creek Runs Red

With lead in the water and towering piles of waste covering 25,000 acres of land, the EPA calls the mining town of Picher, Oklahoma the most toxic place in America. Still, the town’s inhabitants, including the local Quapaw Tribe, call it home.

“The Creek Runs Red,” this week’s featured Vision Maker Media film, goes into a divided community to reveal the complexity of human reactions to environmental disaster, and tells a story that remains deeply relevant in the wake of contemporary discussions about health risks, environmental politics, and racial injustice.

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Watch “The Creek Runs Red” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks – Seasoned With Spirit: Food Upon the Water

This week, Vision Maker Media takes a culinary journey with Loretta Barrett Oden, a renowned Native American chef, food historian and lecturer, and proud woman of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation.

“Seasoned with Spirit: Food Upon the Water” combines Native American history and culture with delicious, healthy recipes inspired by indigenous foods. Much more than simply a cooking series, “Seasoned with Spirit” is a visually stunning, cultural adventure across the American landscape where viewers meet Native American peoples, see their breathtaking environs, learn their history and traditions, and, best of all, taste their cuisine.

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Watch “Seasoned with Spirit: Food Upon the Water” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks – Kinaalda: Navajo Rite of Passage

In this week’s featured Vision Maker Media film, filmmaker Lena Carr documents her niece’s Kinaaldá — a Navajo celebration of the transition from childhood to womanhood that the filmmaker herself was unable to experience.

In documenting the four-day coming-of-age ceremony, Carr provides a rare insider’s look at Navajo culture and the complexities of growing up Navajo in contemporary times, while telling a deeply personal story about herself and her family.

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Watch “Kinaaldá: a Navajo Rite of Passage” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

 

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Rocks With Wings

In 1980, Jerry Richardson, a 24-year-old black man from East Texas who had just finished college in Louisiana, took a job coaching the varsity girls’ basketball team in the depressed Navajo town of Shiprock, New Mexico. The Lady Chieftains launch themselves on a journey towards victory — but success comes at a cost, and behind-the-scenes conflict over Jerry’s methods builds to an explosive finale.

This week’s featured Vision Maker Media film, “Rocks With Wings,” is a story of winning and losing, of struggling with race, heritage and societal expectations for the players, their coach and the entire Navajo community.

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Watch “Rocks With Wings” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Free Webinar Recordings: Strategies for Advancing Hidden Collections

The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) recently completed a six-part webinar series to share best practices and lessons learned from their Cataloging Hidden Collections program. Sponsored through the generous support of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Strategies for Advancing Hidden Collections (SAHC) series aims to help those working in GLAM (Gallery, Library, Archive, Museum) organizations build the confidence they need to tackle the processing of hidden archival collections. This series may also be particularly useful for public media organizations that are planning preservation projects.

Webinars include:

The complete series, including recordings, slides, and transcripts, is now freely available on the CLIR SAHC home page: https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/sahc/sahc.

To supplement the series, an Online Resource Library was also created for increasing the visibility, usability, and sustainability of collections in the GLAM community: https://wiki.diglib.org/Strategies_for_Advancing_Hidden_Collections.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Apache 8

“You never knew what you were going to face … you were with a bunch of women that could handle anything.”

This week’s Vision Maker Media film, “Apache 8,” tells the story of an all-women wildland firefighter crew from the White Mountain Apache Tribe, who have been fighting fires in Arizona and throughout the U.S. for over 30 years. Four extraordinary women from different generations of the Apache 8 crew share their personal narratives with humor and tenderness. “Apache 8” weaves together a compelling tale of these remarkable firefighters, revealed for the first time.

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Watch “Apache 8” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan

In 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services awarded a generous grant to WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) to develop the AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR). Through this project, we have placed seven graduates of master’s degree programs in digital stewardship residencies at public media organizations around the country.This post was written by resident Eddy Colloton, who has just concluded his residency project with the completion of a digital preservation plan for Louisiana Public Broadcasting, his host institution:

I have completed my NDSR AAPB residency at Louisiana Public Broadcasting (LPB)! While most of my cohort will continue chugging along for another few months, I sadly have to finish up a bit early. But, I’m leaving for an exciting opportunity in the conservation department at the Denver Art Museum. I’m feeling good about the time I have spent here at LPB, and the work that we have accomplished. I may even chime in on the ol’ AAPB NDSR blog again down the line, once I’ve had time to lean into some post-residency navel gazing.

Please find my primary deliverable to LPB, the LPB Digital Preservation Plan, below. The objective of this document was to document the station’s current digital preservation procedures, and to make recommendations for improvement. The plan discusses the benefits of creating MediaInfo and MediaConch reports, as well as fixity checks, and how to apply those tools in a production environment. The plan also describes the benefits of using uncompressed and lossless codecs for the preservation of analog video, the methodology and strategy behind planning for LTO tape generation migrations, the importance of collecting production documentation in audiovisual archiving, and much more. While the policies and procedures described in the plan are specific to LPB, I think that there’s certainly information to be gleaned from the plan whether you are working in a public broadcasting archive or not.

I want to offer my thanks to everyone at LPB for being so welcoming to a stranger from the north, and for helping me with so many aspects of my project. I want to offer a special thanks to my host mentor, Leslie Bourgeois, who in spite of having a very difficult year due to the historic flooding that occurred Baton Rouge in August of 2016, has been supportive and encouraging of my work here at LPB. I would also be remiss if I didn’t thank Rebecca Fraimow, the NDSR program coordinator, for constantly being there for me and the rest of the cohort over the last 7 months. And of course a very special thanks to my NDSR cohort for letting me ask them questions, vent to them about my struggles, and allowing me to share a barrage of my dumb jokes. I wish you all the best. AAPB NDSR 4 lyfe!

Download the Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan

Voegeli and Setziol Radio Collections Added to the Online Reading Room

In the past few months, we’ve added several new radio collections to our Online Reading Room!

The Donald Voegeli collection preserves the music and memory of Don Voegeli, who wrote the theme music for All Things Considered on NPR, along with providing many other contributions to public radio over the course of a long and impressive career.

Variations on the  All Things Considered theme make up just a fraction of the Don Voegeli collection. There’s also plenty of Voegeli’s other work to explore, from musical compositions in the vein of the ATC theme like Swiss Clock Maker to catchy educational jingles like Math Song (“you bisect an angle by using a ruler and compass / you bisect a compass by using a good sharp axe”)

Donald Voegeli’s son Jim Voegeli, a radio producer in his own right, has also contributed four audio documentaries of his own as a separate collection. “Speaking of Wilderness,” Jim’s first documentary on the importance of the conservation of wild places, aired on NPR when he was only 16.  Jim’s piece “Remembering Aldo Leopold,” a radio documentary essay on the life and legacy of the visionary conservationist and writer, went on to win an Ohio State Award.

Finally, for more award-winning environmental journalism, check out our newest collection of works by Ilsa Setziol, longtime environmental reporter for KPCC. Among other honors, Setziol has been recognized for Outstanding Beat Reporting in Radio by the Society of Environmental Journalists for pieces like this 2003 report on the environmental aftermath of fires in San Bernardino County, “Fire Recovery, Part 1.”

The archive of Setziol’s work for KPCC offers an invaluable record of environmental concerns and activism from the past 20 years, from reports on the projected devastating impact of global warming in California to stories of activists like Josh Quigley, who spent months sitting in an oak tree to try and save it from being cut down.

Browse the collections to listen to hundreds more great radio pieces:

Donald Voegeli
James F. Voegeli
KPCC (Ilsa Setziol)