PBS NewsHour Digitization Project Update: “Asset Review” and Access and Description Workflows

I’ve previously written about developing and automating management of our workflows for the NewsHour project (click for link), and WGBH’s processes for ingesting and preserving the NewsHour digitizations (click for link). Now that the project is moving along, and over one thousand episodes of the NewsHour are already on the AAPB (with recently added transcript search functionality!!), I thought I would share more information about our access workflows and how we make NewsHour recordings available.

In this post I will describe our “Asset Review” and “Online Workflow” phases. The “Asset Review” phase is where we determine what work we will need to do to a recording to make it available online, and the “Online Workflow” phase is where we extract metadata from a transcript, add the metadata to our repository, and make the recording available online.

The goals and realities of the NewsHour project necessitate an item level content review of each recording. The reasons for this are distinct and compounding. The scale of the collection (nearly 10,000 assets) meant that the inventories from which we derived our metadata were generated only from legacy databases and tape labels, which are sometimes wrong. At no point were we able to confirm that the content on any tape is complete and correct prior to digitization. In fact, some of the tapes are unplayable before being prepared to be digitized. Additionally, there is third-party content that needs to be redacted from some episodes of the NewsHour before they can be made available. A major complication is that the transcripts only match 7pm Eastern broadcasts, and sometimes 9pm or 11pm updates would be recorded and broadcast if breaking news occurred. The tapes are not always marked with broadcast times, and sometimes do not contain the expected content – or even an episode of the NewsHour!

These complications would be fine if we were only preserving the collection, but our project goal is to make each recording and corresponding transcript or closed caption file broadly accessible. To accomplish that goal each record must have good metadata, and to have that we must review and describe each record! Luckily, some of the description, redaction, and our workflow tracking is automatable.

Access and Description Workflow Overview

As I’ve mentioned before, we coordinate and document all our NewsHour work in a large Google Sheet we call the “NewsHour Workflow workbook” (click here for link). The chart below explains how a GUID moves through sheets of the NewsHour workbook throughout our access and description work.

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AAPB NewsHour Acces and Description workflow chart

After a digitized recording has been delivered to WGBH and preserved, it is automatically placed in queue on the “Asset Review” sheet of our workbook. During the Asset Review, the reviewer answers thirteen different questions about the GUID. Using these responses, the Google Sheet automatically places the assets into the appropriate workflow trackers in our workbook. For instance, if a recording doesn’t have a transcript, it is placed in the “No Transcript tracker”, which has extra workflow steps for generating a description and subject metadata. A GUID can have multiple issues that place it into multiple trackers simultaneously. For instance, a tape that is not an episode will also not have a transcript, and will be placed on both the “Not an Episode tracker” and the “No Transcript tracker”. The Asset Review is critical because the answers determine the work we must perform, and ensures that each record will be correctly presented to the public when work on it is completed.

A GUID’s status in the various trackers is reflected in the “Master GUID Status sheet”, and is automatically updated when different criteria in the trackers are met and documented. When a GUID’s workflow tasks have been completely resolved in all the trackers, it appears as “Ready to go online” on the “Master GUID Status sheet.” The GUID is then automatically placed into to the “AAPB Online Status tracker”, which presents the metadata necessary to put the GUID online and indicates if tasks have been completed in the “Online Workflow tracker”. When all tasks are completed, the GUID will be online and our work on the GUID is finished.

In this post I am focusing on a workflow that follows digitizations which don’t have problems. This means the GUIDs are episodes, contain no technical errors, and have transcripts that match (green arrows in the chart). In future blog posts I’ll elaborate on our workflows for recordings that go into the other trackers (red arrows).

Asset Review

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An image of a portion of our Access Review spreadsheet

Each row of the “Asset Review sheet” represents one asset, or GUID. Columns A-G (green cell color) on the sheet are filled with descriptive and administrative metadata describing each item. This metadata is auto-populated from other sheets in the workbook. Columns H-W (yellow cell color) are the reviewer’s working area, with questions to answer about each item reviewed. As mentioned earlier, the answers to the questions determines the actions that need to be taken before the recording is ready to go online, and place the GUID into the appropriate workflow trackers.

The answers to some questions on the sheet impact the need to answer others, and cells auto-populate with “N/A” when one answer precludes another. Almost all the answers require controlled values, and the cells will not accept input besides those values. If any of the cells are left blank (besides questions #14 and #15) the review will not register as completed on the “Master GUID Status Sheet”. I have automated and applied value control to as much of the data entry in the workbook as possible, because doing so helps mitigate human error. The controlled values also facilitate workbook automation, because we’ve programmed different actions to trigger when specific expected text strings appear in cells. For instance, the answer to “Is there a transcript for this video?” must be “Yes” or “No”, and those are the only input the cell will accept. A “No” answer places the GUID on the “No Transcript tracker”, and a “Yes” does not.

To review an item, staff open the GUID on an access hard drive. We have a multiple access drives which contain copies of all the proxy files delivered NewsHour digitizations. Reviewers are expected to watch between one and a half to three minutes of the beginning, middle, and end of a recording, and to check for errors while fast-forwarding through everything not watched. The questions reviewers answer are:

  1. Is this video a nightly broadcast episode?
  2. If an episode, is the recording complete?
  3. If incomplete, describe the incompleteness.
  4. Is the date we have recorded in the metadata correct?
  5. If not, what is the corrected date?
  6. Has the date been updated in our metadata repository, the Archival Management System?
  7. Is the audio and video as expected, based on the digitization vendor’s transfer notes?
  8. If not, what is wrong with the audio or video?
  9. Is there a transcript for this video?
  10. If yes, what is the transcript’s filename?
  11. Does the video content completely match the transcript?
  12. If no, in what ways and where doesn’t the transcript match?
  13. Does the closed caption file match completely (if one exists)?
  14. Should this video be part of a promotional exhibit?
  15. Any notes to project manager?
  16. Date the review is completed.
  17. Initials of the reviewer.

Our internal documentation has specific guidelines on how to answer each of these questions, but I will spare you those details! If you’re conducting quality control and description of media at your institution, these questions are probably familiar to you. After a bit of practice reviewers become adept at locating transcripts, reviewing content, and answering the questions. Each asset takes about ten minutes to review if the transcript matches, the content is the expected recording, and the digitization is error free. If any of those criteria are not true, the review will take longer. The review is laborious, but an essential step to make the records available.

Online Workflow

A large majority of recordings are immediately ready to go online following the asset review. These ready GUIDs are automatically placed into the “AAPB Online Status tracker,” where we track the workflow to generate metadata from the transcript and upload that and the recording to the AAPB.

About once a month I use the “AAPB Online Status tracker” to generate a list of GUIDs and corresponding transcripts and closed caption files that are ready to go online. To do this, all I have to do is filter for GUIDs in the “AAPB Online Status tracker” that have the workflow status “Incomplete” and copy the relevant data for those GUIDs out of the tracker and into a text file. I import this list into a FileMaker tool we call “NH-DAVE” that our Systems Analyst constructed for the project.

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A screenshot of our FileMaker tool “NH-DAVE”

“NH-DAVE” is a relational database containing all of the metadata that was originally encoded within the NewsHour transcripts. The episode transcripts provided by NewsHour contained the names of individuals appearing and subject terms for that episode in marked up values. Their subject terms were much more specific than ours, so we mapped them to the more broad AAPB controlled vocabulary we use to facilitate search and discovery on our website. When I ingest a list of GUIDs and transcripts to “NH-DAVE” and click a few buttons, it uses an AppleScript to match metadata from the transcript to the corresponding NewsHour metadata records in our Archival Management System and generate SQL statements. We use the statements to insert the contributor and subject metadata from the transcripts into the GUIDs’ AAPB metadata records in the Archival Management System.

Once the transcript metadata has been ingested we use both a Bash and a Ruby script to upload the proxy recordings to our streaming service, Sony Ci, and the transcripts and closed caption SRT files to our web platform, Amazon. We run a Bash script to generate another set of SQL statements to add the Sony Ci URLs and some preservation metadata (generated during the digital preservation phase) to our Archival Management System. We then export the GUIDs’ Archival Management System records into PBCore XML and ingest the XML into the AAPB’s website. As each step of this process is completed, we document it in the “Online Workflow tracker,” which will eventually register that work on the GUID is completed. When the PBCore ingest is completed and documented on the “Online Workflow tracker,” the recording and transcript are immediately accessible online and the record displays as complete on the “Master GUID Status spreadsheet”!

We consider a record that has an accurate full text transcript, contributor names, and subject terms to be sufficiently described for discovery functions on the AAPB. The transcript and terms will be fully indexed to facilitate searching and browsing. When a transcript matches, our descriptive process for NewsHour is fully automated. This is because we’re able to utilize the NewsHour’s legacy data. Without that data, the descriptive work required for this collection would be tremendous.

A large majority of NewsHour records follow the workflow I’ve described in this post in their journey to the AAPB. If, unlike those covered here, a record is not an episode, does not have a matching transcript, needs to be redacted, or has technical errors, then it requires more work than I have outlined. Look forward to blog posts about those records in the future! Click here to see a NewsHour record that went through this workflow. If you’re interested in our workflow, I encourage you to open the workbook and use “Find” to follow this GUID (“cpb-aacip-507-0r9m32nr3f”) through the various trackers. Click here to see all NewsHour records that have been put online!

AAPB NDSR Resources Roundup

In 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services awarded a generous grant to WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) to develop the AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR). Through the grant, we placed residents at public media organizations around the country to complete digital stewardship projects.

After a fantastic final presentation at the Society of American Archivists meeting in Portland last month, the 2016-2017 AAPB NDSR residencies have now officially drawn to a close. We wanted to share with you a complete list of the resources generated throughout the residencies, including instructional webinars, blog posts, and resources created for stations over the course of the NDSR projects.

Resources

Audiorecorder (Open-Source Audio Digitization Tool)

CUNY TV Mediamicroservices Documentation

KBOO 2-Page Recommendation Summary

KBOO Digital Preservation Policy

KBOO Current Digital Storage and Archiving Practices

KBOO Diagram for Current Digital Program Production Practices

PBCore-Based Data Model for KBOO Analog Audio Assets

Workflow for Open-Reel Preservation at KBOO

KBOO Digital Audio Guidelines and Procedures

Recommended Next Steps for Developing an Integrated Searchable Database of Born-Digital and Analog Audio at KBOO

Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan

WHUT Naming Conventions for Local Programming

Wisconsin Public Television Microsoft Access Database to PBCore Crosswalk

Wisconsin Public Television AMS Workflows Documentation

Wisconsin Public Television Digitization Workflows Chart

Wisconsin Public Television Proposal for New Metadata Database

Resident Webinars

Challenges of Removable Media in Digital Preservation,” by Eddy Colloton (slides)

Demystifying FFmpeg/FFprobe,” by Andrew Weaver (slides)

Intro to Data Manipulation with Python CSV,” by Adam Lott (slides)

Through the Trapdoor: Metadata and Disambiguation in Fanfiction,” by Kate McManus (slides)

ResourceSpace for Audiovisual Archiving,” by Selena Chau (slides) (Demo videos: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Whats, Whys, and How Tos of Web Archiving,” by Lorena Ramírez-López (slides) (transcript)

Other Webinars

“Metadata: Storage, Modeling and Quality,” by Kara Van Malssen, Partner & Senior Consultant at AVPreserve (slides only)

Public Media Production Workflows,” by Leah Weisse, WGBH Digital Archive Manager/Production Archival Compliance Manager (slides)

Imposter Syndrome” by Jen LaBarbera, Head Archivist at Lambda Archives of San Diego, and Dinah Handel, Mass Digitization Coordinator at the NYPL (slides)

Preservation and Access: Digital Audio,” by Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director and AV Conservator at the Southern Folklife Collection (slides)

Troubleshooting Digital Preservation,” by Shira Peltzman, Digital Archivist at UCLA Library (slides)

Studs Terkel Radio Archive: Tips and Tricks for Sharing Great Audio,” by Grace Radkins, Digital Content Librarian at Studs Terkel Radio Library (slides)

From Theory to Action: Digital Preservation Tools and Strategies,” by Danielle Spalenka, Project Director of the Digital POWRR Project (slides)

Resident Blog Posts

Digital Stewardship at KBOO Community Radio,” Selena Chau (8/9/16)

Metadata Practices at Minnesota Public Radio,” Kate McManus (8/15/16)

NDSA, data wrangling, and KBOO treasures,” Selena Chau (8/30/16)

Minnesota Books and Authors,” Kate McManus (9/23/16)

Snapshot from the IASA Conference: Thoughts on the 2nd Day,” Eddy Colloton (9/29/16)

Who just md5deep-ed and redirected all them checksums to a .csv file? This gal,” Lorena Ramírez-López (10/6/16)

IASA Day 1 and Voice to Text Recognition,” Selena Chau (10/11/16)

IASA – Remixed,” Kate McManus (10/12/16)

Learning GitHub (or, if I can do it, you can too!)” Andrew Weaver (10/13/16)
Home Movie Day,” Eddy Colloton (10/15/16)

Snakes in the Archive,” Adam Lott (10/20/16)

Vietnam, Oral Histories, and the WYSO Archives Digital Humanities Symposium,” Tressa Graves (11/7/16)

Archives in Conversation (A Glimpse into the Minnesota Archives Symposium, 2016),” Kate McManus (11/15/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 1: SpaceSaver,” Lorena Ramírez-López (11/21/16)

Is there something that does it all?: Choosing a metadata management system,” Selena Chau (11/22/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 2: lots of manual labor,” Lorena Ramírez-López (12/20/16)

Just Ask For Help Already!” Eddy Colloton (12/22/16)

Playing with Pandas: CSV metadata transformations,” Selena Chau (1/4/17)

MPR50,” Kate McManus (2/8/17)

Before & after XML to PBCore in ResourceSpace,” Selena Chau (2/9/17)

Advocating for Archives in a Production Environment,” Eddy Colloton (2/27/17)

Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan,” Eddy Colloton (3/6/17)

Moving Beyond the Allegory of the Lone Digital Archivist (& my day of Windows scripting at KBOO,” Selena Chau (3/16/17)

Save the Data!” Kate McManus (3/16/17)

Professional Development Time Project: Audiorecorder,” Andrew Weaver (3/27/17)

Library Technology Conference,” Kate McManus (3/29/17)

Reporting from PNW: Online Northwest Conference,” Selena Chau (4/13/17)

Adventures in Perceptual Hashing,” Andrew Weaver (4/20/17)

Trying New Things: Meditations on NDSR from the Symposium in DC,” Kate McManus (5/3/17)

Filmed Immersion Week Sessions

Why Archive Public Media

The History of Public Media and the AAPB

Mastering Project Management

Growing Your Professional Profile

Negotiating at Work

Think Like a Computer

Get To Know Your Audiovisual Media 

Many of these resources can also be found on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting Wiki, created by the residents for their collaborative final project.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: The Medicine Game

Vision Maker Media’s “Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks” promotion concludes this week with our final featured Vision Maker Media film.

“The Medicine Game” follows the story of brothers from the Onondaga Nation who pursue their dreams of playing lacrosse for Syracuse University. With their dream nearly in reach, the boys are caught in a constant struggle to define their Native identity, live-up to their family’s expectations and balance challenges on and off the Reservation.

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Watch “The Medicine Game” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Vision Maker Media would like to thank all the viewers who tuned in to stream 40 Years. 40 Films. 40 Weeks. In the last 40 years, the organization has created more than 500 films, awarded $11 million to independent producers and held hundreds of film-screening events across the nation. While only a portion of that was able to be shared in the last 40 weeks, Vision Maker Media hopes that these films have inspired viewers to look at the world through Indigenous eyes.

The AAAPB has been proud to collaborate with Vision Maker Media to share these films and celebrate the amazing work done by Vision Maker Media over the past forty years.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, http://www.visionmakermedia.org

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Silent Thunder

This week’s Vision Maker Media film focuses on Arapaho elder Stanford Addison, a quadriplegic spiritual leader who trains wild horses on the Wind River Reservation.

Told primarily in the voices of Addison and those around him, “Silent Thunder” demonstrates Addison’s unique method of training horses — and people — while encouraging them to keep their spirit.

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Watch “Silent Thunder” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramTumblrLinkedInVimeoPinterest, or Google+.

Summer in the City: Farmers’ Markets and Their Origins

As an intern at the American Archive of Public Broadcasting at WGBH, I am living in Boston for the first time. I’ve decided to make it my goal to explore the city and since it’s summertime, the sun is out and beckoning the city’s inhabitants to head outside. One popular activity is frequenting the farmers’ markets that Boston has to offer! The City of Boston reports that it handles almost thirty markets, but that number doesn’t even include the numerous markets that are in the surrounding suburbs. But when did farmers’ markets become so popular? We might take their existence for granted now, but they haven’t always had the thriving customer base they do today. Looking through content at the American Archive of Public Broadcasting, we can see how farmers’ markets have evolved throughout the years.

In July of 1978, a Boston WGBH production called GBH Journal presented a story about a farmers’ market in Dorchester. In the story, the reporter explains how the markets provide benefits for both the farmers and the buyers. For example, the farmers can “bypass the middle person” and the consumers pay “less for their produce and also get fresh, nutritious vegetables and fruits for their money.” The program also describes how farmers’ markets aid the economy in Massachusetts by providing an economic boost for struggling farmers and an affordable food source for lower-income citizens. This same farmers’ market in Dorchester still runs today at Fields Corner every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Farmers’ markets continued to grow in popularity throughout the country, and in 2007, Tampa public broadcasting station WEDU ran a storyScreen Shot 2017-06-30 at 11.55.36 AM about a popular market in Sarasota, Florida on its series Gulf Coast Journal with Jack Perkins. Featured is a local citrus farmer, Tim Brown of Brown’s Grove Citrus and Produce. Brown talks about the high quality of his family’s produce, emphasizing its freshness: “the citrus that we pick on Friday night is on the street Saturday morning.” Tony Souza from the Downtown Partnership of Sarasota explains the market’s popularity in the clip, stating that “the locals come up because it’s the thing to do.” Throughout the story, the program highlights the community involvement found at farmers’ markets as a main attraction. Like the Dorchester market in Boston, the Sarasota farmers’ market still runs every Saturday. The Brown family even still sells their produce.

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To understand why farmers’ markets are popular today, it is helpful to understand how organic and small farmers gained prevalence in an industry that favors corporate, high-quantity producers. In September of 2004 at Washington State University, Northwest Public Television recorded a presentation by the former Executive Director of the Organic Farming Research Foundation (OFRF), Bob Scowcroft. In this talk, Scowcroft discusses how the OFRF assisted in bringing national attention to organic farming, citing press interviews, conferences, and researching for grants as key factors to its success. He also reads a passage from a 1970 LIFE magazine, quoting “the ideas are simple and appealing: we eat too much, mostly of the wrong things; our food comes to us not as nature intended, but altered by man during both growth and processing.” As a pioneer in organic farming, Scowcroft offers insight to how organic, small farming has grown throughout the years and the challenges it still faces.

Today, farmers’ markets continue to flourish. In 1978, public broadcasting aimed to inform the public about the basic facts of farmers’ markets. Thirty years later in 2007, public broadcasting instead demonstrated how farmers’ markets had become a community staple where people from different backgrounds could come together to support the local economy. These markets remain an excellent way to learn, explore, and enjoy a variety of unique and vibrant cultural areas all over the United States and even beyond its borders.

hannah_gore_headshotThis post was written by Hannah Gore, AAPB Intro to Media Archives Intern and student at Dickinson College.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: My Louisiana Love

In this week’s Vision Maker Media film, Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to find a place with her Houma Indian family, and becomes a witness to the impact of decades of environmental degradation.  As Monique’s losses mount, she finds herself turning to environmental activism, documenting her family’s struggle to stay close to the land despite the rapidly disappearing coastline and a cycle of disasters that includes two devastating hurricanes and the worst oil spill in US history.

“My Louisiana Love” provides an intimate documentary portrait of the impact on the oil industry and man-made environmental crises on the indigenous community of the Mississippi Delta.

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Watch “My Louisiana Love” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramTumblrLinkedInVimeoPinterest, or Google+.

 

 

 

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Smokin’ Fish

This week’s featured Vision Maker Media film follows Cory Mann, a Tlingit businessman hustling to make a dollar in Juneau, Alaska, as he follows an impulse to spend a summer smoking salmon the way his great-grandmother used to do.

“Smokin’ Fish” interweaves the story of Mann’s family, his bills and his business with the untold history of the Tlingit and the process of preparing this traditional food. By turns tragic, bizarre, or just plain ridiculous, Smokin’ Fish illustrates one man’s attempts to navigate the messy zone of collision between the modern world and an ancient culture.

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Watch “Smokin’ Fish” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramTumblrLinkedInVimeoPinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years through Women’s Healthcare

As lawmakers currently decide the future of American healthcare, many politicians and organizations are seizing the opportunity to express their own sentiments on the subject. A particularly hot topic has been how the new law will affect women, which has long been a controversial subject in the United States. The modern women’s healthcare movement has its roots in the figure of Margaret Sanger. Though she had to take temporary asylum in Europe after illegally distributing contraceptive information, Sanger eventually established the modern-day Planned Parenthood in 1921. To learn more about the evolution of women’s healthcare, content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting facilitates an analysis of how public opinion of healthcare has developed over the last forty years.

In the 70s, WNScreen Shot 2017-06-22 at 12.05.17 PMED of Buffalo, N.Y. produced a series of interviews entitled “Woman.” On Dec. 4, 1975, WNED recorded an episode with breast cancer advocate Rose Kushner. Interviewed by Sandra Elkin, Kushner criticizes the routine medical practices taken in treatment of breast cancer in the United States. Instead, she praises the practices of other countries with nationalized healthcare systems: “There is a big difference in countries where medicine is nationalized,” she explains. For context, a timeline by PBS reports that in the 70s, healthcare was “seen as in crisis” due to the quickly rising costs.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 1.06.18 PMAbout twenty years later in 1992, healthcare costs continued to rise due to economic inflation. On July 29, Kojo Nnmadi hosted a group of four women to speak on his WHUT-produced program, Evening Exchange, in Washington, D.C. The guests included physician Maggie Covington, naturopathologist Andrea Sullivan, president of the National Black Women’s Health project Julia Scott, and president of the Black Lesbian Support Group Cindy Smith. In the program, Scott explains her view that minority women do not receive enough care in medicine, stating that “there is a lot happening in our society that has to do with racism and classicism that makes poor women be much more ill than other segments of the population.” The program ends with the conclusion that women need greater representation in the healthcare system, as Cindy Smith asserts “it’s still a man’s world.”

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 2.08.15 PMAnother twenty years later, President Barack Obama signed into existence his healthcare reform bill in 2010. In a 2013 Louisiana Public Broadcasting broadcast, Donna Fraiche speaks at the Baton Rotary Club on the now three-year-old Affordable Care Act. Although moving away from the lens of the female experience, she details the high costs of American healthcare. Notably, Fraiche outlines that “we’re the richest country in the world, but we spend the most of our dollars on healthcare.” Her knowledge of Japan allows her to explain the differences in the American and Japanese systems, since she served as honorary consul-general of Japan for New Orleans.

Today, this passion for a stronger healthcare system thrives as the American people continue the journey to find a system that is beneficial for our country. Though laws and politics may continue to change, history affirms our dedication towards bettering our medical care. In these programs, the women all had drastically different perspectives and backgrounds, ranging from writers to lawyers to advocates. Yet, they all provided information that helped to develop and challenge public notions of healthcare in the United States.

This post was written by Hannah Gore, AAPB Intro to Media Archives Intern and student at Dickinson College.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Sousa on the Rez

This week’s featured Vision Maker Media film focuses on Native American marching bands, their history, and their players’ relationships with American and Western music. The film contains interviews with musicians in Native American bands and features both contemporary and historical footage of Native players.

“Sousa on the Rez” examines the history of American marching music, the influence of boarding schools on Native American musicians, stereotypes, and the continuing legacy of Native American marching bands throughout the country.

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Watch “Sousa on the Rez” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramTumblrLinkedInVimeoPinterest, or Google+.

AAPB Debuts New Online Exhibit “Structuring the News: The Magazine Format in Public Media”

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) has launched a new digital exhibit about newsmagazines, a popular form of news presentation spanning five decades of radio and television broadcasting. Departing from mainstream examples such as 60 Minutes and All Things Considered, the exhibit brings together unique programs produced by independent stations from across the country for the first time as a unified collection. The newsmagazines showcased in “Structuring the News” cover topics from labor strikes to a day in the life of an air traffic controller, and emphasize conversations and voices often overlooked by network news shows.

“Structuring the News” is curated by Digital Exhibits Intern Alejandra Dean, and highlights 42 definitive examples representing both metropolitan producers and smaller, regional studios. Many of the shows in the exhibit prioritize local issues and communities, providing a window into American daily life from 1976-2016. In addition to defining the format, the exhibit looks at important precursors during the 1960s that experimented with news reporting.

“Structuring the News” can be accessed online at http://americanarchive.org/exhibits/newsmagazines.

To celebrate the launch of “Structuring the News: The Magazine Format in Public Media”, the exhibit’s curator, Alejandra Dean, AAPB Project Manager Casey Davis Kaufman, and Mark Williams, Professor of Film and Media Studies at Dartmouth College, will be discussing newsmagazines in a Facebook Live event at 12pm EDT on Thursday, July 6th. Don’t miss this inside look at over fifty years of broadcast newsmagazines, and the chance to ask questions about the exhibit! To watch, head to WGBH’s Facebook page at 12pm EDT on July 6th.