American Archive of Public Broadcasting Releases Exclusive Collections

The Library of Congress and WGBH have acquired and preserved original, full-length interviews from The Civil War, Eyes on the Prize and American Masters
  
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) recently acquired three collections of original, full-length interviews from groundbreaking public television documentaries: Ken Burns’ The Civil War, Eyes on the Prize and American Masters. Only excerpts of these interviews were included in previously released, edited programs. Now, the full-length interviews from these landmark series will be available to view online at americanarchive.org or in person at the Library of Congress and at WGBH, preserved for future generations to learn about our nation’s history.
 
The AAPB, a collaboration between the Library of Congress and Boston public media station WGBH, has digitized and preserved more than 50,000 hours of broadcasts and previously inaccessible programs from public radio and public television’s more than 60-year legacy.
 
Interviews from Ken Burns’ The Civil War
 
The Civil War, an epic nine-episode series by the award-winning documentary filmmaker Ken Burns and produced in conjunction with WETA, Washington, DC and American Documentaries, Inc., first aired in September 1990 to an audience of 40 million viewers. The film is the recipient of 40 major film and television awards, including two Emmys and two Grammys.
 
The AAPB The Civil War collection includes eight digitized, full-length interviews with distinguished historians and commentators Barbara J. Fields, C. Vann Woodward, Robert Penn Warren, William Safire, James Symington, Stephen B. Oates, Ed Bearss and Daisy Turner. The Civil War collection is available online athttp://americanarchive.org/special_collections/ken-burns-civil-war.
 
Interviews from Eyes on the Prize
 
Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years 1954–1965 tells the definitive story of the civil rights era from the point of view of the ordinary men and women whose extraordinary actions launched a movement that changed the fabric of American life, and embodied a struggle whose reverberations continue to be felt today. The award-winning documentary series recounts the fight to end decades of discrimination and segregation from the murder of Emmett Till and the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955 and 1956 to the 1965 Voting Rights Campaign in Selma, Alabama. Eyes on the Prize was produced by Blackside, Inc and aired on PBS in 1987.
 
The Eyes on the Prize interviews collection comes from Washington University Libraries’ Henry Hampton Collection and includes 75 hours of full-length interviews with leaders and activists such as Rosa Parks, Constance Baker Motley, James Farmer, Robert Moses, Andrew Young, John Lewis, Ralph Abernathy, Stokely Carmichael and Myrlie Evers. The Eyes on the Prize collection is available online at http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/eotp-i-interviews.
 
Interviews from American Masters
 
American Masters is an award-winning biography series that celebrates American arts and culture. Launched in 1986 on PBS, the series set the standard for documentary film profiles, and is produced by New York’s flagship PBS station THIRTEEN for WNET.
 
AAPB has preserved more than 800 full-length interviews filmed for American Masters with cultural luminaries such as David Bowie, Yoko Ono, Robert Plant, Tim Burton, Nora Ephron, Denzel Washington, Carol Burnett, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Quincy Jones and Jimmy Carter. The interviews, digitized for In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive and the American Masters Podcast, will be archived for long-term storage at the Library of Congress to ensure their survival for future generations. Researchers can access the full collection on location at the Library of Congress and at WGBH. Information about the American Masters collection is available at http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/american-masters-interviews.
 
The AAPB is a national effort to preserve at-risk public media and provide a central web portal for access to the programming that public stations and producers have created over the past 60 years. In its initial phase, the AAPB digitized approximately 40,000 hours of radio and television programming and related materials selected by more than 100 public media stations and organizations across the country. The entire collection is available for research on location at the Library of Congress and WGBH, and currently more than 20,000 programs are available in the AAPB’s Online Reading Room at americanarchive.org to anyone in the United States.
 
– – –
About WGBH
WGBH Boston is America’s preeminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the Web, including Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Frontline, Nova, American Experience, Arthur and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle, and children’s series. WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia™, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, or visually impaired. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards…even two Oscars. Find more information at www.wgbh.org.
 
About the Library of Congress
The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States – and extensive materials from around the world – both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship atcopyright.gov.
 
About the American Archive of Public Broadcasting
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 60 years. To date, over 40,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at the Library of Congress and WGBH, and more than 20,000 programs are available online atamericanarchive.org.

Week Two of #PubMedia50: Radio Broadcasting

A Month-long Celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50th Anniversary

Last week we started our month-long commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson on November 7, 1967. We’re joining in with other public broadcasters and organizations such as PBS, NPR, CPB and APTS to celebrate this momentous milestone in our history.

Thanks to those who participated in sharing their unique personal and institutional histories surrounding the history and preservation of public broadcasting with our first week of ‘Firsts’ and Major Ideas of Public Broadcasting.

We learned so much from your archives and we look forward to this coming week’s theme: Radio Broadcasting!

The goal of each challenge is to engage in community, discover histories, share those stories with the public, and start dialogues. Get the theme beforehand by contacting our Engagement and Use Manager, Ryn Marchese at ryn_marchese@wgbh.org, or check out our social pages on Mondays!

You can tune-in to the campaign by posting on Thursdays! We invite public broadcasting organizations, museums, archives, libraries, historians, public media fans, and other cultural organizations to personalize #PubMedia50 and share the stories in your own holdings and memories.

As for us, we’ll be posting content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting every day. Don’t miss a beat and let us know what you think!

See you there!

Week 2 | Post content on November 9th (Th): Radio Broadcasting 

Who was the voice behind the mic? Who are some local radio pioneers in your community? What local and national radio pioneers inspired you or your institutions? What historic radio materials can you share from your archives this week?
To get started:

Example Tweets:

“We’re teaming up with @amarchivepub and #PubMedia50 stations to celebrate #PubMedia! Join in and share your history & content!”

“We’re joining @amarchivepub in celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act at #PubMedia50!”

Instagram/Facebook Post:

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, we’ll be posting content to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! Teaming up with @amarchivepub, #PubMedia50 stations, academics, and community members we’ll have a new #PubMedia50 theme each week. Join the conversation by tagging your post with #PubMedia50.

  • You can follow us here:

Instagram: @amarchivepub

Facebook: @amarchivepub

Twitter: @amarchivepub

 

Library and WGBH Acquire Historic TV Coverage of Senate Watergate Hearings

Digital Files Now Available on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting Website

Press Contact: Sheryl Cannady, Library of Congress, (202) 707-6456 | Emily Balk, WGBH, (617) 300-5317
Public Contact: Alan Gevinson, Library of Congress, (202) 707-0582 | Karen Cariani, WGBH, (617) 300-4286
Website: “Gavel-to-Gavel”: The Watergate Scandal and Public Television External

The Library of Congress and Boston public broadcaster WGBH announced today that gavel-to-gavel television coverage of the Senate Watergate hearings in 1973, donated to the Library by WETA Washington, D.C., has been digitally preserved and made available online.  Produced by the National Public Affairs Center for Television (NPACT), the hearings were taped during the day and rebroadcast every evening on public television for 51 days, from May 17 to Nov. 15. These broadcasts became one of the most popular series in public broadcasting history.

For the first time in 44 years, these riveting moments in history will once again be available to the American public through an online presentation—“Gavel-to-Gavel: The Watergate Scandal and Public Television”—on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) website at americanarchive.org. AAPB is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH to preserve and make accessible significant at-risk public media.

The presentation will provide access to all the coverage, a highlights reel, episode guide and an essay putting the coverage into historical perspective. Visitors to the online exhibit—curated by 2017 Library of Congress Junior Fellow Amanda Reichenbach—will see firsthand the memorable personalities involved in this national drama and the revelations that ultimately led to resignation of President Richard Nixon. Journalists Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer worked together for the first time as anchors to bring balanced commentary, allowing viewers to experience the full hearings and make their own informed opinions.  The coverage became a model for public television and, later, C-SPAN.

Each episode of the coverage begins with about five minutes of commentary by MacNeil and Lehrer, including a recap of what happened during that day’s hearing. The hearings range from two to seven hours in length. The anchors close out with a 10- to 20-minute wrap-up with experts and interviews conducted by correspondent Peter Kaye. The Senate Watergate Committee conducted its investigation in three phases: Watergate (May 17–Sept. 25), Campaign Practices or “Dirty Tricks” (Sept. 26–Nov. 6) and Campaign Finance (Nov. 7–Nov. 15). Coverage by NPACT of the subsequent House impeachment hearings in May and July 1974 also has been digitized and made available online.

After acquiring the tapes, the Library digitized nearly 352 hours of NPACT’s continuous coverage. The digital content was transferred to WGBH for inclusion in AAPB. Nearly a third of AAPB’s complete collection of 50,000 hours of preserved public TV and radio content is now available online for research, educational and informational purposes.

WGBH Boston is America’s pre-eminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the web, including “Masterpiece,” “Antiques Roadshow,” “Frontline,” “Nova,” “American Experience,” “Arthur” and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle and children’s series. WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind or visually impaired. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards and two Oscars. Find more information at wgbh.org.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Announcement: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-17-167/library-and-wgbh-acquire-historic-tv-coverage-of-senate-watergate-hearings/2017-11-03/

Tune-In with #PubMedia50

A Month-long Celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50th Anniversary

Happy UNESCO World Day for Audiovisual Heritage! What better day than today to kick-off our month-long commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson on November 7, 1967. We’re joining in with other public broadcasters and organizations such as PBS, NPR, CPB and APTS to celebrate this momentous milestone in our history.

To celebrate the anniversary, we’re inviting you to a five-week social media campaign encouraging institutions and individuals to share their unique personal and institutional histories surrounding the history and preservation of public broadcasting.

Every week beginning in November 2017, we’ll issue a new #PubMedia50 challenge. The goal of each challenge is to engage in community, discover histories, share those stories with the public, and start dialogues. Get the theme beforehand by contacting our Engagement and Use Manager, Ryn Marchese at ryn_marchese@wgbh.org, or check out our social pages on Mondays!

Tune-in on Thursdays! We invite public broadcasting organizations, museums, archives, libraries, historians, public media fans, and other cultural organizations to personalize #PubMedia50 and share the stories in your own holdings and memories.

As for us, we’ll be posting content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting every day. Don’t miss a beat and let us know what you think!

But we’ll give you a sneak peek, here’s the theme to Week One!

Week 1 | Post your content on November 2nd (Th): Firsts and Major Ideas 

(First Broadcasts/ First Broadcasters / Major Contributors / Major Ideas)

Share your ‘firsts’! What was the first public broadcasting program or series you watched? When did your station go on the air? Who were the major supporters and early pioneers that led to the development of public broadcasting in the United States? What ideas inspired the formation of public broadcasting and public programming? What are the earliest and most significant public broadcasting content and records in your collections?

  • To get started:

Example Tweets:

“We’re teaming up with @amarchivepub and #PubMedia50 stations to celebrate #PubMedia! Join in and share your history & content!”

“We’re joining @amarchivepub in celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act at #PubMedia50!”

Instagram/Facebook Post:

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, we’ll be posting content to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! Teaming up with @amarchivepub, #PubMedia50 stations, academics, and community members we’ll have a new #PubMedia50 theme each week. Join the conversation by tagging your post with #PubMedia50.

  • You can follow us here:

Instagram: @amarchivepub

Facebook: @amarchivepub

Twitter: @amarchivepub

PubMedia

(Photo: Yoichi Okamoto, LBJ Library)

The Library and WGBH Celebrate 50 Years of Preserving Public Television and Radio

The Library of Congress and Boston public broadcaster WGBH will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 with a series of panels featuring pioneers and experts in public broadcasting Friday, Nov. 3, 2 p.m.–6 p.m.  The symposium—“Preserving Public Broadcasting at 50 Years”—will be held in the Montpelier room on the sixth floor of the Library’s James Madison Memorial Building, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, D.C.

The event is free, but tickets are required and there may be special restrictions.  To secure tickets, visit this event-ticketing site: https://preservingat50.eventbrite.com/. 

The event also will be livestreamed on the Library’s Facebook page at facebook.com/libraryofcongress and its YouTube site (with captions) at youtube.com/LibraryOfCongress.

Signed by President Lyndon Johnson, the act established public broadcasting as it is organized today and also authorized the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) to establish and maintain a library and archives of non-commercial educational television and radio programs.  CPB established the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) in 2009 and, in 2013, the Library of Congress and WGBH assumed responsibility of AAPB, coordinating a national effort to preserve and make accessible significant at-risk public media.

A Library report on television and video preservation in 1997 cited the importance of public broadcasting:

“[I]t is still not easy to overstate the immense cultural value of this unique audiovisual legacy, whose loss would symbolize one of the great conflagrations of our age, tantamount to the burning of Alexandria’s library in the age of antiquity.”

The initial AAPB archive, donated by more than 100 public broadcasting stations, contained more than 40,000 hours of content from the early 1950s to the present.  The full collection, now more than 50,000 hours of preserved content, is available on-site to researchers at the Library in Washington, D.C., and WGBH in Boston, Massachusetts.  Nearly a third of the files, however, are now available online for research, educational and informational purposes at http://americanarchive.org.

During the symposium, panelists will examine the history of public broadcasting, the origins of its news and public affairs programming, the importance of preservation and the educational uses of public broadcasting programs for K-12 and college education, scholarship and adult education.  Also highlighted will be some of AAPB’s most significant collections, such as the “PBS NewsHour” and its predecessors, which are currently being digitized for online access, and full interviews conducted for “Eyes on the Prize” and “American Experience” documentaries.

The program schedule is subject to change, but confirmed participants include:

2 p.m. –      Introductions and Welcoming Remarks

  • Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress
  • Jon Abbott, President and CEO, WGBH
  • Patricia Harrison, President and CEO, CPB

2:15 p.m. – Origins                    

  • Nicholas Johnson, FCC commissioner, 1966-73
  • Bill Siemering, NPR co-founder, creator of “All Things Considered”
  • Newton Minow, FCC chairman, 1961-63, via video
  • Ervin Duggan, FCC commissioner (1990-93); President of PBS (1993-99)
  • Cokie Roberts, NPR and MacNeil/Lehrer contributor; AAPB adviser (moderator)

3:10 p.m. –  News and Public Affairs Talk Shows

  • Jim Lehrer, co-anchor, “MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour”
  • Dick Cavett, host of “The Dick Cavett Show,” 1977-1982
  • Cokie Roberts, NPR and MacNeil/Lehrer contributor; AAPB adviser
  • Hugo Morales, co-founder, Radio Bilingüe
  • Sharon Percy Rockefeller, CEO, WETA-TV
  • Judy Woodruff, “PBS NewsHour” (moderator)

 4:10 p.m. – Documentaries: Style and the Use of Archives

  • David Fanning, creator, “FRONTLINE”                              
  • Clayborne Carson, founder and director of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute; senior adviser, “Eyes on the Prize”
  • Stephen Gong, director, Center for Asian American Media
  • Margaret Drain, former executive producer of “American Experience”
  • Patricia Aufderheide, university professor of Communication Studies at American University (moderator)

5:10 p.m. –   Educational Uses of Public Broadcasting

  • Lloyd Morrisett, co-creator, “Sesame Street”
  • Paula Apsell, executive producer of “NOVA”
  • Debra Sanchez, Senior Vice President for Education and Children’s Content                Operations, Corporation for Public Broadcasting
  • Kathryn Ostrofsky, instructor, Angelo State University, Department of History
  • Jennifer Lawson, founding chief programming executive, PBS (moderator)

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

WGBH Boston is America’s pre-eminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the web, including “Masterpiece,” “Antiques Roadshow,” “FRONTLINE,” “NOVA,” “American Experience,” “Arthur,” “Curious George” and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle and children’s series. WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind or visually impaired. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards … even two Oscars. Find more information at www.wgbh.org.

WGBH Awarded Grant by Institute of Museum and Library Services for Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship

Grant of $229,772 will fund students’ work on digitization of historic, at-risk public media content from underrepresented regions and communities

BOSTON, September 28, 2017 – WGBH Educational Foundation is pleased to announce that the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has awarded WGBH a $229,772 Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program grant to launch the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship. The fellowship will fund 10 graduate students from across the United States to digitize at-risk audiovisual materials at public media organizations near their universities. The digitized content will ultimately be incorporated into the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), a collaboration between Boston public media station WGBH and the Library of Congress working to digitize and preserve thousands of broadcasts and previously inaccessible programs from public radio and public television’s more than 60-year legacy.

“We are honored that the Institute of Museum and Library Services has chosen WGBH to lead the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship,” said Casey Davis Kaufman, Associate Director of the WGBH Media Library and Archives and WGBH’s AAPB Project Manager. “This grant will allow us to prepare a new generation of library and information science professionals to save at-risk and historically significant public broadcasting collections, especially fragile audiovisual materials, from regions and communities underrepresented in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting.”

WGBH has developed partnerships with library and information science programs and archival science programs at five universities: Clayton State University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Oklahoma, University of Missouri, and San Jose State University. Each school will be paired with a public media organization that will serve as a host site for two consecutive fellowships: Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, KOPN Community Radio, and the Center for Asian American Media in partnership with the Bay Area Video Coalition.

“As centers of learning and catalysts of community change, libraries and museums connect people with programs, services, collections, information, and new ideas in the arts, sciences, and humanities. They serve as vital spaces where people can connect with each other,” said IMLS Director Dr. Kathryn K. Matthew. “IMLS is proud to support their work through our grant making as they inform and inspire all in their communities.”

The first fellowship will take place during the 2018 spring semester, from January to April of 2018. The second fellowship will take place during the summer semester from June to August of 2018. The grant also will support participating universities in developing long-term audiovisual preservation curricula, including providing funding for audiovisual digitization equipment, and developing partnerships with local public media organizations.

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About WGBH
WGBH Boston is America’s preeminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the Web, including Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Frontline, Nova, American Experience, Arthur, Curious George, and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle, and children’s series. WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, or visually impaired. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards…even two Oscars. Find more information at www.wgbh.org.

About the Library of Congress
The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States – and extensive materials from around the world – both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

About the American Archive of Public Broadcasting
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 60 years. To date, nearly 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and more than 22,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

About IMLS
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is celebrating its 20th Anniversary. IMLS is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 35,000 museums. Our mission has been to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. For the past 20 years, our grant making, policy development, and research has helped libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit http://www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Introducing an audio labeling toolkit

In 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) awarded WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting a grant to address the challenges faced by many libraries and archives trying to provide better access to their media collections through online discoverability. Through a collaboration with Pop Up Archive and HiPSTAS at the University of Texas at Austin, our project has supported the creation of speech-to-transcripts for the initial 40,000 hours of historic public broadcasting preserved in the AAPB, the launch of a free open-source speech-to-text tool, and FIX IT, a game that allows the public to help correct our transcripts.

Now, our colleagues at HiPSTAS are debuting a new machine learning toolkit and DIY techniques for labeling speakers in “unheard” audio — audio that is not documented in a machine-generated transcript. The toolkit was developed through a massive effort using machine learning to identify notable speakers’ voices (such as Martin Luther King, Jr. and John F. Kennedy) from within the AAPB’s 40,000 hour collection of historic public broadcasting content.

This effort has vast potential for archivists, researchers, and other organizations seeking to discover and make accessible sound at scale — sound that otherwise would require a human to listen and identify in every digital file.

Read more about the audio labeling toolkit here, and stay tuned for more posts in this series.

Audio_Labeler_The_World

PBCore Development Priorities

As part of our NEH-funded PBCore Development and Training Project, we’re developing tools and resources around PBCore, a metadata schema and data model designed to describe and manage audiovisual collections.

Based on feedback from a previous survey to users and potential users, we’ve generated a list of tools and resources that previous respondents indicated would be valuable to the archival and broadcasting communities. Now, we’re looking for feedback on what to prioritize that will be of real use to the archives and public media communities.

Please fill out this short survey – which should take at most five minutes – to check out our development plans and give your feedback on where we should focus our efforts: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/WPF3QZD

Thanks for taking the time to fill out the survey! You can read more about the PBCore Development and Training Project here and see the PBCore website here.

PBS NewsHour Digitization Project Update: “Asset Review” and Access and Description Workflows

I’ve previously written about developing and automating management of our workflows for the NewsHour project (click for link), and WGBH’s processes for ingesting and preserving the NewsHour digitizations (click for link). Now that the project is moving along, and over one thousand episodes of the NewsHour are already on the AAPB (with recently added transcript search functionality!!), I thought I would share more information about our access workflows and how we make NewsHour recordings available.

In this post I will describe our “Asset Review” and “Online Workflow” phases. The “Asset Review” phase is where we determine what work we will need to do to a recording to make it available online, and the “Online Workflow” phase is where we extract metadata from a transcript, add the metadata to our repository, and make the recording available online.

The goals and realities of the NewsHour project necessitate an item level content review of each recording. The reasons for this are distinct and compounding. The scale of the collection (nearly 10,000 assets) meant that the inventories from which we derived our metadata were generated only from legacy databases and tape labels, which are sometimes wrong. At no point were we able to confirm that the content on any tape is complete and correct prior to digitization. In fact, some of the tapes are unplayable before being prepared to be digitized. Additionally, there is third-party content that needs to be redacted from some episodes of the NewsHour before they can be made available. A major complication is that the transcripts only match 7pm Eastern broadcasts, and sometimes 9pm or 11pm updates would be recorded and broadcast if breaking news occurred. The tapes are not always marked with broadcast times, and sometimes do not contain the expected content – or even an episode of the NewsHour!

These complications would be fine if we were only preserving the collection, but our project goal is to make each recording and corresponding transcript or closed caption file broadly accessible. To accomplish that goal each record must have good metadata, and to have that we must review and describe each record! Luckily, some of the description, redaction, and our workflow tracking is automatable.

Access and Description Workflow Overview

As I’ve mentioned before, we coordinate and document all our NewsHour work in a large Google Sheet we call the “NewsHour Workflow workbook” (click here for link). The chart below explains how a GUID moves through sheets of the NewsHour workbook throughout our access and description work.

NewsHour_AccessWorkflowChart.png
AAPB NewsHour Acces and Description workflow chart

After a digitized recording has been delivered to WGBH and preserved, it is automatically placed in queue on the “Asset Review” sheet of our workbook. During the Asset Review, the reviewer answers thirteen different questions about the GUID. Using these responses, the Google Sheet automatically places the assets into the appropriate workflow trackers in our workbook. For instance, if a recording doesn’t have a transcript, it is placed in the “No Transcript tracker”, which has extra workflow steps for generating a description and subject metadata. A GUID can have multiple issues that place it into multiple trackers simultaneously. For instance, a tape that is not an episode will also not have a transcript, and will be placed on both the “Not an Episode tracker” and the “No Transcript tracker”. The Asset Review is critical because the answers determine the work we must perform, and ensures that each record will be correctly presented to the public when work on it is completed.

A GUID’s status in the various trackers is reflected in the “Master GUID Status sheet”, and is automatically updated when different criteria in the trackers are met and documented. When a GUID’s workflow tasks have been completely resolved in all the trackers, it appears as “Ready to go online” on the “Master GUID Status sheet.” The GUID is then automatically placed into to the “AAPB Online Status tracker”, which presents the metadata necessary to put the GUID online and indicates if tasks have been completed in the “Online Workflow tracker”. When all tasks are completed, the GUID will be online and our work on the GUID is finished.

In this post I am focusing on a workflow that follows digitizations which don’t have problems. This means the GUIDs are episodes, contain no technical errors, and have transcripts that match (green arrows in the chart). In future blog posts I’ll elaborate on our workflows for recordings that go into the other trackers (red arrows).

Asset Review

NewsHour_AssetReview
An image of a portion of our Access Review spreadsheet

Each row of the “Asset Review sheet” represents one asset, or GUID. Columns A-G (green cell color) on the sheet are filled with descriptive and administrative metadata describing each item. This metadata is auto-populated from other sheets in the workbook. Columns H-W (yellow cell color) are the reviewer’s working area, with questions to answer about each item reviewed. As mentioned earlier, the answers to the questions determines the actions that need to be taken before the recording is ready to go online, and place the GUID into the appropriate workflow trackers.

The answers to some questions on the sheet impact the need to answer others, and cells auto-populate with “N/A” when one answer precludes another. Almost all the answers require controlled values, and the cells will not accept input besides those values. If any of the cells are left blank (besides questions #14 and #15) the review will not register as completed on the “Master GUID Status Sheet”. I have automated and applied value control to as much of the data entry in the workbook as possible, because doing so helps mitigate human error. The controlled values also facilitate workbook automation, because we’ve programmed different actions to trigger when specific expected text strings appear in cells. For instance, the answer to “Is there a transcript for this video?” must be “Yes” or “No”, and those are the only input the cell will accept. A “No” answer places the GUID on the “No Transcript tracker”, and a “Yes” does not.

To review an item, staff open the GUID on an access hard drive. We have a multiple access drives which contain copies of all the proxy files delivered NewsHour digitizations. Reviewers are expected to watch between one and a half to three minutes of the beginning, middle, and end of a recording, and to check for errors while fast-forwarding through everything not watched. The questions reviewers answer are:

  1. Is this video a nightly broadcast episode?
  2. If an episode, is the recording complete?
  3. If incomplete, describe the incompleteness.
  4. Is the date we have recorded in the metadata correct?
  5. If not, what is the corrected date?
  6. Has the date been updated in our metadata repository, the Archival Management System?
  7. Is the audio and video as expected, based on the digitization vendor’s transfer notes?
  8. If not, what is wrong with the audio or video?
  9. Is there a transcript for this video?
  10. If yes, what is the transcript’s filename?
  11. Does the video content completely match the transcript?
  12. If no, in what ways and where doesn’t the transcript match?
  13. Does the closed caption file match completely (if one exists)?
  14. Should this video be part of a promotional exhibit?
  15. Any notes to project manager?
  16. Date the review is completed.
  17. Initials of the reviewer.

Our internal documentation has specific guidelines on how to answer each of these questions, but I will spare you those details! If you’re conducting quality control and description of media at your institution, these questions are probably familiar to you. After a bit of practice reviewers become adept at locating transcripts, reviewing content, and answering the questions. Each asset takes about ten minutes to review if the transcript matches, the content is the expected recording, and the digitization is error free. If any of those criteria are not true, the review will take longer. The review is laborious, but an essential step to make the records available.

Online Workflow

A large majority of recordings are immediately ready to go online following the asset review. These ready GUIDs are automatically placed into the “AAPB Online Status tracker,” where we track the workflow to generate metadata from the transcript and upload that and the recording to the AAPB.

About once a month I use the “AAPB Online Status tracker” to generate a list of GUIDs and corresponding transcripts and closed caption files that are ready to go online. To do this, all I have to do is filter for GUIDs in the “AAPB Online Status tracker” that have the workflow status “Incomplete” and copy the relevant data for those GUIDs out of the tracker and into a text file. I import this list into a FileMaker tool we call “NH-DAVE” that our Systems Analyst constructed for the project.

NewsHour_NHDAVE.png
A screenshot of our FileMaker tool “NH-DAVE”

“NH-DAVE” is a relational database containing all of the metadata that was originally encoded within the NewsHour transcripts. The episode transcripts provided by NewsHour contained the names of individuals appearing and subject terms for that episode in marked up values. Their subject terms were much more specific than ours, so we mapped them to the more broad AAPB controlled vocabulary we use to facilitate search and discovery on our website. When I ingest a list of GUIDs and transcripts to “NH-DAVE” and click a few buttons, it uses an AppleScript to match metadata from the transcript to the corresponding NewsHour metadata records in our Archival Management System and generate SQL statements. We use the statements to insert the contributor and subject metadata from the transcripts into the GUIDs’ AAPB metadata records in the Archival Management System.

Once the transcript metadata has been ingested we use both a Bash and a Ruby script to upload the proxy recordings to our streaming service, Sony Ci, and the transcripts and closed caption SRT files to our web platform, Amazon. We run a Bash script to generate another set of SQL statements to add the Sony Ci URLs and some preservation metadata (generated during the digital preservation phase) to our Archival Management System. We then export the GUIDs’ Archival Management System records into PBCore XML and ingest the XML into the AAPB’s website. As each step of this process is completed, we document it in the “Online Workflow tracker,” which will eventually register that work on the GUID is completed. When the PBCore ingest is completed and documented on the “Online Workflow tracker,” the recording and transcript are immediately accessible online and the record displays as complete on the “Master GUID Status spreadsheet”!

We consider a record that has an accurate full text transcript, contributor names, and subject terms to be sufficiently described for discovery functions on the AAPB. The transcript and terms will be fully indexed to facilitate searching and browsing. When a transcript matches, our descriptive process for NewsHour is fully automated. This is because we’re able to utilize the NewsHour’s legacy data. Without that data, the descriptive work required for this collection would be tremendous.

A large majority of NewsHour records follow the workflow I’ve described in this post in their journey to the AAPB. If, unlike those covered here, a record is not an episode, does not have a matching transcript, needs to be redacted, or has technical errors, then it requires more work than I have outlined. Look forward to blog posts about those records in the future! Click here to see a NewsHour record that went through this workflow. If you’re interested in our workflow, I encourage you to open the workbook and use “Find” to follow this GUID (“cpb-aacip-507-0r9m32nr3f”) through the various trackers. Click here to see all NewsHour records that have been put online!

AAPB NDSR Resources Roundup

In 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services awarded a generous grant to WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) to develop the AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR). Through the grant, we placed residents at public media organizations around the country to complete digital stewardship projects.

After a fantastic final presentation at the Society of American Archivists meeting in Portland last month, the 2016-2017 AAPB NDSR residencies have now officially drawn to a close. We wanted to share with you a complete list of the resources generated throughout the residencies, including instructional webinars, blog posts, and resources created for stations over the course of the NDSR projects.

Resources

Audiorecorder (Open-Source Audio Digitization Tool)

CUNY TV Mediamicroservices Documentation

KBOO 2-Page Recommendation Summary

KBOO Digital Preservation Policy

KBOO Current Digital Storage and Archiving Practices

KBOO Diagram for Current Digital Program Production Practices

PBCore-Based Data Model for KBOO Analog Audio Assets

Workflow for Open-Reel Preservation at KBOO

KBOO Digital Audio Guidelines and Procedures

Recommended Next Steps for Developing an Integrated Searchable Database of Born-Digital and Analog Audio at KBOO

Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan

WHUT Naming Conventions for Local Programming

Wisconsin Public Television Microsoft Access Database to PBCore Crosswalk

Wisconsin Public Television AMS Workflows Documentation

Wisconsin Public Television Digitization Workflows Chart

Wisconsin Public Television Proposal for New Metadata Database

Resident Webinars

Challenges of Removable Media in Digital Preservation,” by Eddy Colloton (slides)

Demystifying FFmpeg/FFprobe,” by Andrew Weaver (slides)

Intro to Data Manipulation with Python CSV,” by Adam Lott (slides)

Through the Trapdoor: Metadata and Disambiguation in Fanfiction,” by Kate McManus (slides)

ResourceSpace for Audiovisual Archiving,” by Selena Chau (slides) (Demo videos: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Whats, Whys, and How Tos of Web Archiving,” by Lorena Ramírez-López (slides) (transcript)

Other Webinars

“Metadata: Storage, Modeling and Quality,” by Kara Van Malssen, Partner & Senior Consultant at AVPreserve (slides only)

Public Media Production Workflows,” by Leah Weisse, WGBH Digital Archive Manager/Production Archival Compliance Manager (slides)

Imposter Syndrome” by Jen LaBarbera, Head Archivist at Lambda Archives of San Diego, and Dinah Handel, Mass Digitization Coordinator at the NYPL (slides)

Preservation and Access: Digital Audio,” by Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director and AV Conservator at the Southern Folklife Collection (slides)

Troubleshooting Digital Preservation,” by Shira Peltzman, Digital Archivist at UCLA Library (slides)

Studs Terkel Radio Archive: Tips and Tricks for Sharing Great Audio,” by Grace Radkins, Digital Content Librarian at Studs Terkel Radio Library (slides)

From Theory to Action: Digital Preservation Tools and Strategies,” by Danielle Spalenka, Project Director of the Digital POWRR Project (slides)

Resident Blog Posts

Digital Stewardship at KBOO Community Radio,” Selena Chau (8/9/16)

Metadata Practices at Minnesota Public Radio,” Kate McManus (8/15/16)

NDSA, data wrangling, and KBOO treasures,” Selena Chau (8/30/16)

Minnesota Books and Authors,” Kate McManus (9/23/16)

Snapshot from the IASA Conference: Thoughts on the 2nd Day,” Eddy Colloton (9/29/16)

Who just md5deep-ed and redirected all them checksums to a .csv file? This gal,” Lorena Ramírez-López (10/6/16)

IASA Day 1 and Voice to Text Recognition,” Selena Chau (10/11/16)

IASA – Remixed,” Kate McManus (10/12/16)

Learning GitHub (or, if I can do it, you can too!)” Andrew Weaver (10/13/16)
Home Movie Day,” Eddy Colloton (10/15/16)

Snakes in the Archive,” Adam Lott (10/20/16)

Vietnam, Oral Histories, and the WYSO Archives Digital Humanities Symposium,” Tressa Graves (11/7/16)

Archives in Conversation (A Glimpse into the Minnesota Archives Symposium, 2016),” Kate McManus (11/15/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 1: SpaceSaver,” Lorena Ramírez-López (11/21/16)

Is there something that does it all?: Choosing a metadata management system,” Selena Chau (11/22/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 2: lots of manual labor,” Lorena Ramírez-López (12/20/16)

Just Ask For Help Already!” Eddy Colloton (12/22/16)

Playing with Pandas: CSV metadata transformations,” Selena Chau (1/4/17)

MPR50,” Kate McManus (2/8/17)

Before & after XML to PBCore in ResourceSpace,” Selena Chau (2/9/17)

Advocating for Archives in a Production Environment,” Eddy Colloton (2/27/17)

Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan,” Eddy Colloton (3/6/17)

Moving Beyond the Allegory of the Lone Digital Archivist (& my day of Windows scripting at KBOO,” Selena Chau (3/16/17)

Save the Data!” Kate McManus (3/16/17)

Professional Development Time Project: Audiorecorder,” Andrew Weaver (3/27/17)

Library Technology Conference,” Kate McManus (3/29/17)

Reporting from PNW: Online Northwest Conference,” Selena Chau (4/13/17)

Adventures in Perceptual Hashing,” Andrew Weaver (4/20/17)

Trying New Things: Meditations on NDSR from the Symposium in DC,” Kate McManus (5/3/17)

Filmed Immersion Week Sessions

Why Archive Public Media

The History of Public Media and the AAPB

Mastering Project Management

Growing Your Professional Profile

Negotiating at Work

Think Like a Computer

Get To Know Your Audiovisual Media 

Many of these resources can also be found on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting Wiki, created by the residents for their collaborative final project.