Dena Schulze, Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellow at WUNC

My name is Dena Schulze and I am the Public Broadcasting Preservation fellow partnered with WUNC radio station in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I graduate in May from the Archives and Records Management track in the Library Science School at UNC. It has been my privilege to digitize over 170 assets from WUNC radio station that were deemed at risk.  Formats included CDs, cassettes and DAT tapes. Check out some pictures and ramblings about my experience below!

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Time Travelin’ with WUNC

Every time I put on the headphones, cue up the tape or CD and press record it’s like stepping into a time machine! I had noise reducing headphones that allowed me to be totally immersed in the recordings. Shows at WUNC that I digitized were mostly weekly talk shows about current events and the people, places and things of North Carolina. There were also special programs and recordings that changed up the monotony of talk shows. I enjoyed learning about the state that I have called home for the last fifteen years. Over the course of the fellowship I was able to digitize about 170 assets and learned so much about both the process and the content. Here are a few key words that summarize my experience:

Relevance

There were times when I was listening to a talk show or news segment and if you had changed the names and dates, I would have thought it was a current broadcast. Topics included poverty, politics, abortion, economics, gay marriage, health care, etc. These issues are still constantly in the news and being debated in our country. While I was listening to people talk about these issues 5, 10, 20 years ago it brought a new perspective to the news I was reading about in the present. Will we ever solve these problems or end the debate? Maybe not but I think the continuing discussion is vital and looking back on what has been said before can help the present conversation move forward.

Appreciation

Many of the shows and recordings also featured performing arts and music. Gary Shivers on Jazz played collections of jazz music, including an episode on Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald which I thoroughly enjoyed. The first episode of The Linda Belans show focused on television, specifically the popular shows airing at the time: Friends and Frasier. There was also a collection of short stories recorded by authors including Lee Smith and Haven Kimmel. As someone who loves the arts, I loved this theme throughout the assets and listening to things I would never have heard of otherwise.

Treasures

Cueing up a tape was almost like going on a treasure hunt! The titles of the episode didn’t necessarily tell me what I was going to be listening to for the next hour or so. Sometimes they were pretty simple: “Ray Bradbury” was a conversation with the famous author. Others had one description or name but that was only part of the tape. I was surprised to discover a whole segment on the art of fiddling and another interview featuring actress Amy Adams at the beginning of her career. Some did not even have a description on the tape and that content was a total surprise! Kept me on my toes!

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North Carolina!

As mentioned above, I have lived in North Carolina for the past fifteen years and felt a strong connection to the shows focusing on the people, places and issues of the state. One show discusses a school being built near where I lived and I had no idea its history and beginning. Another had an interview with Dr. William Friday, who is basically North Carolina royalty and at one time was the president of the University of North Carolina system. Every recording dealt with a person, issue or place concerning the state of North Carolina. It gave me a greater knowledge and appreciation for the state I call home!

Flexibility

This word describes more of the process than the content. Because we were creating the workstation and workflow from the ground up, there were a lot of hiccups to work through. Equipment did not arrive on time or did not work properly, the computer did not read the CDs or programs correctly, miscommunication in emails are just a few examples. I had to be ready to move onto another part of the fellowship while other factors were figured out or fixed. Once the workstation and workflow were set up, everything ran a lot smoother but it takes time to get all the different pieces working together. I found it vital that I had mentors and professionals at my university and at the station to ask for help and I would not have gotten the workstation up and running without them!

I had so much fun immersing myself in recordings from the past and learning some history! I think these recordings are going to be so valuable on the AAPB website and I am so glad I was able to help get them online!

– Written by PBPF Fellow Dena Schulze

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About PBPF

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, supports ten graduate student fellows at University of North Carolina, San Jose State University, Clayton State University, University of Missouri, and University of Oklahoma in digitizing at-risk materials at public media organizations around the country. Host sites include the Center for Asian American Media, Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, and KOPN Community Radio. Contents digitized by the fellows will be preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The grant also supports participating universities in developing long-term programs around audiovisual preservation and ongoing partnerships with their local public media stations.

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work.

WGBH, AVP, and Indiana University to Enhance and Configure Avalon for the American Archive of Public Broadcasting

New Avalon system will replace Archival Management System (AMS) to ingest, manage and provide access to 70+ years of digitized public broadcasting content

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AMS System

WGBH Educational Foundation on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is pleased to announce the start of development on a new management system for the AAPB, funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The AAPB, a collaboration between Boston public broadcaster WGBH and the Library of Congress, has been working to digitize and preserve more than 50,000 hours of broadcasts and previously inaccessible programs from public radio and public television’s more than 70-year legacy. The new system, built in compliance with the PBCore metadata schema, will improve the AAPB’s ability to acquire additional collections and manage the metadata for the 2.5 million records in the AAPB’s collection. The system will also provide participating public broadcasting stations and archives across the country a platform to search, manage, and access their own collections.

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WGBH is teaming up with AVP and Indiana University Libraries to configure Avalon, an evolving and robust media delivery system created within the Samvera community, to the needs of the AAPB. The Samvera community is a group of over 35 institutions working together to develop shared technical solutions for the management of digital content. To provide the most benefit to both the AAPB and the Samvera community, the team is using a strategy of building multiple components or modules that can be plugged into Hyrax, an application adopted widely by Samvera partners, like Avalon. Among the features the team plans to develop are reporting functionality and support for PBCore ingest, export, and data modeling.  In the spirit of open source development, the Archival Management System (AMS) is being developed in tandem with the next iteration of Avalon. As both projects progress, the AMS team will work in close collaboration and consultation with Avalon team members, comprised of Indiana University and Northwestern University staff. WGBH, Indiana University, and Northwestern University are partners in the Samvera community.

About WGBH

wgbh_logo  WGBH Boston is America’s preeminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the Web, including Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Frontline, Nova, American Experience, Arthur, and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle, and children’s series. WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, or visually impaired. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards…even two Oscars. Find more information at www.wgbh.org.

About the American Archive of Public Broadcasting

AAPB_4Square_color_rgb  The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and almost 25,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

About AVP

Header-Logo.png Founded in 2006, AVP is a global consulting and software development firm focused on freeing organizations from the obstacles of information management and maximizing the usability of their data. AVP focuses on leveraging a deep understanding of technology, information, business, and people to advance the ways in which data is used for the benefit of individuals, organizations, and causes. Visit AVP at https://www.weareavp.com

About Indiana University Libraries

Screen Shot 2018-04-13 at 10.36.37 AM.png Bloomington, Indiana is home to Indiana University Libraries, one of the nation’s largest public academic research libraries. Our collections, people, and spaces use knowledge to inspire great work.  IU Libraries partners with every academic department on campus. Materials are digital, visual, audio and print. Over 60,000 journals are offered electronically, and the libraries hold 9.9 million print volumes in 450 languages, and 100,000 films in its Moving Image Archive. A long-time leader in digital library projects and open source software development, IU Libraries developed wide-ranging digital initiatives as early as the 1990’s and recently embarked on the ambitious university-wide Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative.

About The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

TAWMellonF.LOGO.Pos Founded in 1969, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation endeavors to strengthen, promote, and, where necessary, defend the contributions of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse and democratic societies by supporting exemplary institutions of higher education and culture as they renew and provide access to an invaluable heritage of ambitious, path-breaking work. Additional information is available at mellon.org.

 

Upcoming Webinar: Digital File Management at Public Media Stations

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This Thursday, April 19th at 8 pm (EST), American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) will host a webinar on Digital File Management at Public Media Stations. The public is welcome to join past AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residents who will present on best practices based on the lessons learned from their NDSR projects.

Webinar URL: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/pbpfdigitalfiles/

For anyone who missed the last webinar on tools for Quality Control, it’s now also available for viewing through this link: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/psv1042lp222/.

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About NDSR

In April of 2015, the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) was awarded a grant by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to develop a National Digital Stewardship Residency program focused specifically on the area of digital audiovisual preservation in the realm of public media.  Over the course of the 27-month grant, the AAPB sent seven residents to serve out ten-month residencies in organizations that create and hold public media content, working to develop effective digital stewardship models for this crucial aspect of American heritage.

About PBPF

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work: digitized content preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting from our collaborating host organizations WUNCKOPNOklahoma Educational Television AuthorityGeorgia Public Broadcasting, and the Center for Asian American Media as well as documentation created to support ongoing audio and video preservation education at the University of MissouriUniversity of OklahomaClayton State UniversityUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and San Jose State University.

 

AAPB Webinar Series with the Boston Library Consortium

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This past March, the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) hosted two webinars with the Boston Library Consortium. This two-part webinar series provided an overview on the AAPB as well as review ways in which it can be effectively used as a resource for teaching and research.

Part I – “Accessibility of AAPB in Academic Libraries”
This webinar covered AAPB’s background, governance and infrastructure. Casey Kaufman, AAPB Project Manager, and Ryn Marchese, AAPB Engagement and Use Manager, discussed the scope, content and provenance of the AAPB collection; methods of searching, navigating, and accessing content in the AAPB; examples of the types of materials available in the AAPB collection, and the scholarly and research value of audiovisual collections and specifically public media archives.

Slides available: https://www.slideshare.net/RynMarchese/blc-webinar-part-1-accessibility-of-aapb-for-academic-libraries

 

In this webinar, panelists Casey Kaufman (WGBH), Ingrid Ockert (Princeton University), and Mark Williams (Dartmouth College), explored specific use cases for librarians and researchers in accessing and making use of the AAPB collection. They included a general overview of how scholars and researchers are seeking to use digital AV collections, a brief recap of how AAPB provides access to its collection to researchers and the general public, incorporating AAPB into subject-specific LibGuides, use of audiovisual collections in traditional historical research and in academic coursework, and examples of how AAPB metadata and transcripts can be used in digital humanities research and data mining.

Slides available: https://blc.org/sites/default/files/BLC_Uploads/Part%20II_BLCs%20AAPB%20Webinars_Speaker%20Slides.pdf

 

Special thanks to Jessica Hardin and Susan Stearns of the Boston Library Consortium for helping organizing this series!

The National Association of Educational Broadcasters (NAEB) Collection Now Available on AAPB

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The National Association of Educational Broadcasters (NAEB) Collection, now available on the AAPB website, consists of more than 5,500 radio programs from the 1950s and 1960s, created by over 100 NAEB member stations. The collection includes radio documentaries, coverage of events (hearings, meetings, conferences, and seminars), interviews, debates, and lectures on public affairs topics such as civil rights, foreign affairs, health, politics, education, and broadcasting.

These broadcasts, mostly stemming from university and public school-run radio stations, provide an in-depth look at the engagements and events of American history, as they were broadcast to and received by the general public in the twentieth century. Interview subjects and/or program participants feature a “who’s who” of mid-20th century public figures, including Hubert Humphrey, Betty Shabazz, Robert Frost, Frank Lloyd Wright, Alistair Cooke, Dr. Benjamin Spock, Margaret Mead, Studs Terkel, Dr. Albert Schweitzer, Marshall McLuhan, and Aldous Huxley. The collection also contains a notably large percentage of local content and voices, from a WDET Detroit series about local civil defense plans and policies called “Prepare for Survival,” to a series entitled “Document: Deep South,” a documentary series produced by WOUA at the University of Alabama depicting the increasing importance of the South in the economic development of the United States, to a show entitled “Search for Mental Health,” a series of talks about advances in psychiatry from the University of Chicago.

The NAEB was established in 1934 from a precursor organization, the Association of College and University Broadcasting Stations, that formed in 1925. The mission of the NAEB was to use communications technology for education and social purposes. It was an extremely successful and effective trade organization that, throughout its 60 years of existence, ushered in or helped to enable major changes in early educational broadcasting policy. In 1951, NAEB established a tape duplication exchange system in Urbana, IL, where programs produced by university radio stations across the country were copied and distributed to member stations, an early networking scheme that influenced the history of later public radio and television systems. The forerunner of CPB and its arms, NPR and PBS, the NAEB served as the primary organizer, developer, and distributor for noncommercial broadcast production and analysis between 1925 and 1981.

The NAEB Collection was contributed to the AAPB by the University of Maryland’s National Public Broadcasting Archives. The paper records of the NAEB are housed at University of Maryland and additional related materials are located at the Wisconsin Historical Society.

Access the collection here: http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/naeb

Special thanks to Stephanie Sapienza for her contributions to the curation of this collection.

AAPB Announces Collaboration with Dartmouth College Media Ecology Project

 

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The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) and Dartmouth College are pleased to announce a new collaboration in which AAPB’s Online Reading Room of public television and radio programming will now be accessible through the Media Ecology Project (MEP) at Dartmouth.

The Media Ecology Project is a digital resource directed by Dartmouth Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies Mark J. Williams. MEP provides researchers with not only online access to archival moving image collections but also with tools to participate in new interdisciplinary scholarship that produces metadata about the content of participating archives. By providing annotated knowledge about the archival materials, students and scholars add value back to the archives, making these materials more searchable in the future. The MEP aims to facilitate the awareness of and critical study of media ecology—helping to save and preserve at-risk historical media and contribute to our understanding of their role in the public sphere and in popular memory.

Through this new AAPB-Dartmouth collaboration, historic public broadcasting programs available in the AAPB Online Reading Room will be accessible through the MEP platform. Scholars, researchers and students using the MEP platform will be able to access AAPB collection materials for research, in-classroom presentations and other assignments as part of their academic and scholarly work. MEP scholarly participation spans the disciplines from Arts and Humanities to the Social Sciences, Computer Science and Medical Science. One topic that Williams will immediately pursue with students and colleagues is coverage of the civil rights era that exists in the collection.

While conducting their research via MEP, scholars will be able to give back to AAPB by creating time-based annotations and metadata under a public domain license. Basic descriptive metadata such as credit information for video and audio files is desired, but more granular time-based annotations that describe specific sub-clips within media files will designate more particular areas of scholarly interest. These sub-clips can then be utilized in research essays that are open to scholarly emphases across the academic disciplines. The annotations that students and scholars produce will be made available on the AAPB website for improved searching, navigation and discoverability across the collection and within individual digitized programs and recordings.

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and almost 31,000 programs are available online at: americanarchive.org.
For more information or to request access to specific materials at either of the two sites, researchers can request a research appointment.

Making the AAPB more accessible, useable, and engaging for scholars, researchers and students furthers AAPB’s mission to facilitate the use of historic public broadcasting materials. Further, the capacity of participants in the MEP to generate and provide tagged annotations and metadata to the AAPB will support the archive in becoming a centralized web portal for discovery of the historic content created by public broadcasting over the past 70+ years.

Upcoming AAPB Webinar Featuring Kathryn Gronsbell, Digital Collections Manager at Carnegie Hall

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Photo courtesy of Rebecca Benson, @jeybecques, PBPF Fellow at University of Missouri.

This Thursday, March 15th at 8 pm EST, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) staff will host a webinar with Kathryn Gronsbell, Digital Collections Manager at Carnegie Hall and will cover topics in documentation, including why documentation is important, what to think about when recording workflows for future practitioners, and where to find examples of good documentation in the wild.

The public is welcome to join for the first half hour. The last half hour will be limited to Q&A with our Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellows, who have now begun to inventory their digitized public broadcasting collections to be preserved in the AAPB.

Webinar URL: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/documentation/

For anyone who missed the last webinar on tools for Quality Control, it’s now also available for viewing through this link: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/psv1042lp222/.

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For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work: digitized content preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting from our collaborating host organizations WUNCKOPNOklahoma Educational Television AuthorityGeorgia Public Broadcasting, and the Center for Asian American Media as well as documentation created to support ongoing audio and video preservation education at the University of MissouriUniversity of OklahomaClayton State UniversityUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and San Jose State University.

Celebrate Women’s History Month by Preserving Women’s Voices in Public Media

One of the most fascinating aspects of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is discovering how local broadcasting stations used their platforms to communicate national issues to local audiences.

As second-wave feminism gained momentum between the years 1960 to 1980, WNED from Buffalo, New York documented the movement’s ripple effect in a half-hour public affairs talk show series titled Woman.  Syndicated by over 200 PBS stations during the years 1973-1977, Woman was the only year-round, national public television forum where a wide variety of national experts provided perspectives on the (then) evolving world of women’s history.

To celebrate this milestone in women’s public media history, the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) launched a new Special Collection featuring the Woman series! Over 190 episodes are available online via the AAPB website: http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/woman-series.

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Woman Series, WNED – Buffalo, NY (1973-1977)

The AAPB invites you to celebrate Women’s History Month by helping preserve and make accessible six Woman transcripts. We’re launching a demo-version of our *NEW* transcript editor tool FIX IT+, a line-by-line editing platform initially developed by the New York Public Library. The six featured interviews include conversations with Gloria Steinem (editor and co-founder of Ms. Magazine), Dorothy Pitman Hughes (African American activist and co-founder of Ms. Magazine), Betty Friedan (author of The Feminine Mystique), Nora Ephron (editor for Esquire magazine and the author of the best-selling book Crazy Salad), Marcia Ann Gillespie (editor-in-chief of Essence Magazine and a board member of Essence communications), Connie Uri, M.D. (on the National Board of Research on the Plutonium Economy and the advisory board of NASC, the Native American Solidarity Committee), and Marie Sanchez (Chief Judge of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, member of the Indian Women United for Social Justice).

These transcripts will be made available online through the AAPB’s website, allowing women’s voices in public media to be more readily searchable and accessible for future generations.

Below are sample recordings of the six interviews mentioned above. Search the Woman Special Collection for more interviews with activists, journalists, writers, scholars, lawyers, artists, psychologists, and doctors, covering topics such as women in sports, the Equal Rights Amendment, sexuality, marriage, women’s health, divorce, the Women’s Liberation Movement, motherhood, and ageism, among others.

Direct link to FIX IT+: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/

Sample Recordings of Featured Transcripts:

Connie Uri, M.D. and Marie Sanchez, Chief Judge of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/transcripts/cpb-aacip_81-67wm3fxh

Marcia Ann Gillespie, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/transcripts/cpb-aacip_81-69z08t6x

Nora Ephron, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_81-988gttr0

Gloria Steinem, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_81-57np5qgv

Betty Friedan, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_81-9995xhm0

Dorothy Pitman Hughes, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/transcripts/cpb-aacip_81-59c5b5nr

Written by Ryn Marchese, AAPB Engagement and Use Manager

AAPB Debuts New Exhibit “Protecting Places: Historic Preservation and Public Broadcasting”

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Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) has launched a new digital exhibit titled “Protecting Places: Historic Preservation and Public Broadcasting.” Historic preservation is more than just saving old buildings from the bulldozer. Histories can be shared or silenced depending upon the preservation of places that represent a larger story. AAPB Digital Exhibits Intern Kara Zelasko uncovers how people have used public broadcasting to advocate, negotiate, or protest historic preservation efforts across America. Kara is currently a public history graduate student at Northeastern University interested in exploring history as a tool for placemaking and community engagement.

Using a diverse range of public radio and television content from 1950 – 2012, more than 100 digitized, historic public broadcasting programs, local news reports, radio call-in shows, and interviews document the important relationship historic structures have fostered between people and their neighborhoods. These visual and audio records digitized and preserved by the AAPB reveal the ways people have used or rejected preservation in the ever-changing American landscape to share local and national histories, illuminating the ways Americans have envisioned their communities through buildings and sites that connect past to present.

“Protecting Places: Historic Preservation and Public Broadcasting” is accessible online at http://americanarchive.org/exhibits/historic-preservation.

Listen to sample recordings from the exhibit…

Bill Inge, host of WILL’s radio call-in broadcast “Focus,” asks Richard Moe “how do we decide what buildings are worth saving?” Moe, then president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, answers that the decision essentially lies within the community and what will best serve its current and future needs. This answer underlines the struggle historic preservationists encounter between saving a building to share the past while also serving the community of the present. Listen to the full episode here.

This segment from New Jersey Nightly News explores the Victorian buildings that have come to define Cape May’s community. The interview reveals how Cape May, like many other places, have come to recognize the economic incentive in preserving buildings and landscapes that speak to the neighborhood’s character. Watch the full segment here.

This interview from South Carolina Educational Television’s “Connections” discusses the disappearing cabins of enslaved people in South Carolina.  Historic preservation can be a way to uncover marginalized stories that have been previously ignored. This record and others found in the exhibit reveal how histories have been both erased and uncovered in the American landscape over time. Watch the entire episode here.

Upcoming Webinar: AAPB’s Quality Control Tools and Techniques for Ingesting Digitized Collections

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Oklahoma mentor Lisa Henry (left) cleaning a U-matic deck with Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellow Tanya Yule.

This Thursday, February 15th at 8 pm EST, American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) staff will host a webinar covering quality control tools and technologies used when ingesting digitized collections into the AAPB archive, including MDQC, MediaConch, Sonic Visualizer, and QCTools.

The public is welcome to join for the first half hour. The last half hour will be limited to Q&A with our Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellows, who are just now beginning the process of digitizing at-risk public broadcasting collections to be preserved in the AAPB.

Webinar URL: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/psv1042lp222/

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For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work: digitized content preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting from our collaborating host organizations WUNCKOPNOklahoma Educational Television AuthorityGeorgia Public Broadcasting, and the Center for Asian American Media as well as documentation created to support ongoing audio and video preservation education at the University of MissouriUniversity of OklahomaClayton State UniversityUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and San Jose State University.