Meet American Archive Intern Bryce Roe

Hello, my name is Bryce and I’m excited to be a part of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting team at WGBH this summer! Like the wonderful previous interns, Alyson and Bill, who paved the way for me (nice work guys!), I am a Simmons LIS graduate student specializing in Archives Management.

I first became interested in archives as an undergraduate musicology student, where much of my research time was spent searching for relevant sound and video recordings in the conservatory. I adamantly sought the use of these recordings as a more experiential avenue for learning beyond the text. In addition to animating my research, working with AV materials in the archives also quickly taught me that I was more interested in the recordings themselves than in synthesizing my projects. I became more motivated by questions of how we assign and derive meaning from sounds and moving images and how we preserve and enable these materials to continually invite new experiences.

I am anxious to tackle these questions and help people do research with sound and video. I love learning what sparks people’s interests and strategizing how to facilitate access to the materials that will help them most. It’s very cool to think that historians and archeologists of the future will be able to hear and see us (hopefully with a lot less digging?)! I ultimately hope to broaden the formats and voices embraced by archival practices as well as the kinds of research we do with them, and WGBH is the perfect place to learn!

Below I’ve shared a clip from the American Archive collection that I was personally thrilled to discover. It is from an interview and rehearsal with the late jazz composer and pianist Dave Brubeck as he prepares to perform a 50th anniversary concert at my alma mater, Oberlin College.

The celebrated original performance took place on March 2, 1953, in the campus’ Finney Chapel, where Brubeck and his quartet (Paul Desmond, alto sax; Lloyd David, drums; Ron Crotty, bass) famously introduced jazz to a whole new audience outside of the nightclub – the American undergraduate. Previously, jazz wasn’t even allowed to be played in most conservatory practice rooms, let alone on a concert stage. A few students rounded up the cash themselves to invite Brubeck, who was given a shoddy piano to perform on by the faculty, but a warm welcome from the audience.

In addition to launching Brubeck’s career, the performance helped inspire the now world-renowned jazz program at Oberlin. To our great fortune, the performance was also recorded by the college radio station, WOBC, resulting in the landmark album Jazz at Oberlin. Though I’d listened to hundreds of albums previously, as an undergraduate student learning about the history of jazz at Oberlin, this recording incited an appreciation for the enduring value of historical sounds for my research and enjoyment. The audience’s excitement during this initiation is audible, and you can sense their embrace of the new sounds.

The clip below offers Dave Brubeck’s fond recollection of the night that changed his career and jazz in American. Enjoy! 

This post was written by Bryce Roe, intern for the American Archive of Public Broadcasting at WGBH.

New Guides on the Website

Two new guides were published on the website today that will help stations export their records from the Archival Management System as well as add additional staff members as users or admins. Click on the links below to learn more:

  • Exporting Your Records: this guide provides instructions for exporting your records from the Archival Management System for quick access.
  • Adding a Station User or Admin: here you can find instructions for adding additional staff members as users or admins on the Archival Management System, allowing them to access or edit your stations records.

You can also find links to all of the guides here: http://americanarchive.org/guides/.

 

Join us at the American Archive reception!

The American Archive team will be in San Francisco at the PBS Annual Meeting. We hope that you will join us on Tuesday, May 13th to discuss the American Archive at your station, hear about the project’s latest activities, and most importantly, to give us your feedback!

We’ll be presenting a concurrent session titled “American Archive of Public Broadcasting: Preservation through Collaboration” on Tuesday, May 13th at 3:45pm in Yerba Buena Ballroom Area 20. Presenters will include Project Director Karen Cariani, Project Manager Casey Davis, and collaborators at two American Archive participating stations — Leslie Bourgeois, Archivist at Louisiana Public Broadcasting and Sandy Schonning, Director of TV Production at KQED.

Following the session, join us for an American Archive casual reception in Foothill B (second floor) from 4:30-6:00pm. Refreshments will be served.

If you plan to attend, please let us know by contacting casey_davis [at] wgbh.org. If colleagues from your station are also attending, please take a moment to connect us with them via email. You are all welcome!

If you have any topics or questions that you would like for us to address in the concurrent session, please comment on this post or email them to Casey at the address provided above.

See you in San Francisco!

Attention stations with audio digitization needs: Please take this survey!

We’re posting this today on behalf of the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC). If you work at a radio or tv station and have audio digitization needs, please take a moment to complete their survey.


The Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) has received a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to help address the issues identified in The Library of Congress National Recording Preservation Plan (2012) by exploring the possibility of adding audio preservation to NEDCC’s digitization services.  We have developed a brief online survey to understand the needs of organizations like yours, and hope that you can take a few moments to complete it. It should take no longer than 10 – 15 minutes. The survey can be accessed here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/89RLNJM. It will close on Monday, April 14th.

Your opinion is very important to us and to the field.  With your input, we will be able to make well-informed decisions about the services that collections-holding institutions need and want NEDCC to offer.

Thank you very much for your help, and if you have any questions please contact Jessica Bitely at jbitely@nedcc.org.

New Guides on the Website

Today we published three new guides that will help staff at participating stations navigate the Archival Management System (AMS), view records in the AMS, and edit descriptions for digitized media. The guides include:

  • Using the AMS for the first time: this guide provides an overview of the functionality of the AMS and helps users navigate it to find the records they are looking for
  • Viewing records in the AMS: this guide describes the differences between the asset metadata and instantiation (copy) metadata and how to locate each type of information within a record
  • Editing records in the AMS: here you can find instructions for editing records, as well as suggestions and examples on how to enhance the descriptions of your stations’ digitized media

You can also find links to all of the guides here: http://americanarchive.org/guides/.

This post was written by Casey Davis, American Archive Project Manager at WGBH.

PBCore is Back in Action!

PBCore is back in action! As part of the American Archive initiative, WGBH in collaboration with the Library of Congress has been charged with further developing PBCore (Public Broadcasting Metadata Dictionary). The goals of the project are to:

  • Strategize direction for the PBCore schema
  • Improve the PBCore website
  • Solicit submissions from the public
  • Vote on submissions to improve PBCore
  • Develop resources and provide learning opportunities for organizations interested in using PBCore
  • Encourage and support the use of the standard

As the work progresses in the next few months, you’ll be seeing a lot of changes to the PBCore website and a lot of activity on the PBCore blog. So stay tuned for a new and improved website, schema, and a variety of new resources that will help your organization adopt and use PBCore!

The project is being coordinated the American Archive of Public Broadcasting project team. To form the PBCore Advisory Subcommittee, WGBH’s Project Manager Casey Davis reached out to public media stakeholders from universities, archives, and industry to assemble a group of 42 people, who will work in four groups:

Website  (http://pbcore.org/)

  • Review the PBCore website and other standards websites
  • Identify ways in which the website can be improved and become more user-friendly
  • Review existing record examples and create new examples for the website

Schema Development

  • Gather input from the PBCore Advisory Subcommittee for ideas on schema improvement
  • Consider suggestions provided by the community
  • Develop and implement revisions to the schema
  • Explore opportunities for EBUCore harmonization and RDF implementation

Communications

  • Create the PBCore newsletter
  • Provide updates to organizations and listservs
  • Gather schema development submissions from the public
  • Implement a strategy for communication and outreach to adopters and potential adopters
  • Manage the PBCore blog (http://pbcoreresources.org/)

Education

  • Create, communicate, and disseminate effective learning opportunities for PBCore adopters and potential adopters
  • Develop resources that will be shared on the blog and website, ie FAQs
  • Create instructional videos and conduct webinars
  • Strategize other opportunities for teaching the standard

We’re proud to have such a professionally diverse group of contributors to the project. Members include:

Steering Team
Jack Brighton, Illinois Public Media
Karen Cariani, WGBH
Casey E. Davis, WGBH
Dave MacCarn, WGBH
Kara Van Malssen, AVPreserve
Lauren Sorensen, Library of Congress
Anne Wootton, PopUp Archive

Education
Chair: Anne Wootton, PopUp Archive
Caitlin Birch, Frontline | WGBH
Jessica Bitely, Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC)
Kevin Carter, WGBH
Nick Connizzo, George Washington University
Jeremy Meserve, Belmont Media Center
Bill Nehring, Simmons College | MLIS Candidate
Nancy Watrous, Chicago Film Archive

Schema Development
Chair: Kara Van Malssen, AVPreserve
Margaret Bresnahan, Minnesota Public Radio
Glenn Clatworthy, PBS
Tom Davenport, Folkstreams
Glynn Edwards, Stanford University
Jean-pierre Evain, EBUCore
Leigh Grinstead, LYRASIS
Jimi Jones, Hampshire College
Steve Knoblock, Folksreams
Devon Landes, HBO
Andrea Leigh, Library of Congress
Dave MacCarn, WGBH
Mary Miller, Peabody Awards
John Passmore, WNYC-FM
Allison Smith, Wisconsin Public Radio
Adam Wead, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Leah Weisse, WGBH

Website
Chair: Lauren Sorensen, Library of Congress
Jolene Beiser, Pacifica Radio Archives
Ashley Blewer, University of South Carolina
Nestor Cordova, University of Texas
Jeff Eastman, IMF
Ryan Edge, University of Illinois
Andrew Myers, WGBH
Alexander Papson, University of Notre Dame
Dave Rice, City University of New York
Deanna Ulvestad, Greene County Public Library
Anne Wilkens, Wisconsin Public Television

Communications
Chair: Jack Brighton, Illinois Public Media
Casey Davis, WGBH
Karma Foley, Smithsonian Channel
Bailey Smith, PopUp Archive
Jenny Swadosh, New School

There’s a lot of work to do, and we need your help to make this happen. We want to see PBCore in the wild. How do you use PBCore? What challenges do you have? Let us know in the comment section here or by email, and let’s make PBCore better together.

This post was written by Bailey Smith, Co-founder of PopUp Archive and PBCore Communications Team Secretary.

Meet American Archive Intern Alyson Musser

The American Archive team at WGBH is sincerely grateful to our intern Alyson Musser for all of the work she is accomplishing this semester. With the approval of several stations, we have started to add enhanced descriptions for digital files in the American Archive collection. Alyson is the first intern to be taking on this huge task, and her work will be extremely helpful to users seeking to discover materials when the collection is made available.


Hello, my name is Alyson Musser and I am an intern here at WGBH for the American Archive. I am currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Library and Information Science from Simmons College, with a concentration in Archives Management.  I have a B.A. in History from Cornell University, and I am a huge fan of Downton Abbey.

American Archive Intern Alyson Musser
American Archive Intern Alyson Musser

As an intern, I have been going through the digitized materials in the AMS and adding descriptive information to the records.  So far, the most exciting part of working with the American Archive has been the chance to see some of my favorite historical figures in action. These include, but are not limited to: Eleanor Roosevelt, Julia Child, Dwight Eisenhower, Peter Jennings and John F. Kennedy.

In the 1960’s Eleanor Roosevelt hosted the series “Prospects of Mankind,” which aired on WGBH. The series featured Eleanor hosting panel discussions on pertinent issues of the day. In this episode, Eleanor travelled to the White House to discuss the status of women with JFK. 

Eleanor Roosevelt Interviews JFK from American Archive on Vimeo.

The American Archive also includes more recent television footage, such as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s speech at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign College of Law, aired by Illinois Public Media (WILL) in 1994.  In the speech, Justice Ginsberg blends her insight and wit to trace the history of U.S. legal education. Similar to JFK above, she also discusses the importance of promoting gender equality.

I am looking forward to spending more time with the American Archive collection, and finding more public history treasures to share.

Evacuation Day in Boston

As the host of WGBH Journal, Bill Cavness, put it 36 years ago, “Today is not just St. Patrick’s Day.  In Boston, schools, banks and other public offices are closed because it is Evacuation Day.  Evacuation Day commemorates the final departure of the British from Boston in 1776 during the American Revolutionary War.”

Have a listen to this clip found in the American Archive for Public Broadcasting and learn about why the British troops left Boston and how Evacuation Day became a holiday.


Written and edited by Bill Nehring, American Archive intern at WGBH.

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