Week Four of #PubMedia50: Diversity of Public Broadcasting

*Due to the holiday, join the conversation on Tuesday rather than Thursday, Nov 21nd!

A Month-long Celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50thAnniversary

Three weeks ago we started our month-long commemoration of the 50thanniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson on November 7, 1967. We’re joining in with other public broadcasters and organizations such as PBS, NPR, CPB and APTS to celebrate this momentous milestone in our history.

We learned so much from participating archives and we look forward to this coming week’s theme: Diversity of Public Broadcasting (Community broadcasting, local heritage, unique facts about your research/station).

 

What makes your programming unique? Showcase the diversity of public broadcasting and local heritage documented by public media that is preserved in your collections.

The goal of each challenge is to engage in community, discover histories, share those stories with the public, and start dialogues. Get the theme beforehand by contacting our Engagement and Use Manager, Ryn Marchese at ryn_marchese@wgbh.org, or check out our social pages on Mondays!

You can tune-in to the campaign by posting on Tuesday! We invite public broadcasting organizations, museums, archives, libraries, historians, public media fans, and other cultural organizations to personalize #PubMedia50 and share the stories in your own holdings and memories.

As for us, we’ll be posting content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting every day. Don’t miss a beat and let us know what you think!

See you there!

To get started–

Example Tweets:

“We’re teaming up with @amarchivepub and #PubMedia50 stations to celebrate #PubMedia! Join in and share your history & content!”

“We’re joining @amarchivepub in celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act at #PubMedia50!”

Instagram/Facebook Post:

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, we’ll be posting content to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! Teaming up with @amarchivepub, #PubMedia50 stations, academics, and community members we’ll have a new #PubMedia50 theme each week. Join the conversation by tagging your post with #PubMedia50.

  • You can follow us here:

Instagram: @amarchivepub

Facebook: @amarchivepub

Twitter: @amarchivepub

Week Three of #PubMedia50: Educational Television

A Month-long Celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50thAnniversary

Two weeks ago we started our month-long commemoration of the 50thanniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson on November 7, 1967. We’re joining in with other public broadcasters and organizations such as PBS, NPR, CPB and APTS to celebrate this momentous milestone in our history.

We learned so much from participating archives and we look forward to this coming week’s theme: Educational Television!

The goal of each challenge is to engage in community, discover histories, share those stories with the public, and start dialogues. Get the theme beforehand by contacting our Engagement and Use Manager, Ryn Marchese at ryn_marchese@wgbh.org, or check out our social pages on Mondays!

You can tune-in to the campaign by posting on Thursdays! We invite public broadcasting organizations, museums, archives, libraries, historians, public media fans, and other cultural organizations to personalize #PubMedia50 and share the stories in your own holdings and memories.

As for us, we’ll be posting content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting every day. Don’t miss a beat and let us know what you think!

See you there!

Week 3 | Post content on November 16th (Th): Educational Television 

What are some of your favorite series or programs? What are the earliest programs that your station produced? Who were some of the first producers at your station? Which early series are most representative of the formats and genres created during the early years of public broadcasting? Which ones are still pertinent? What records or content related to early educational programming do you maintain in your archives? How has educational television evolved since its formation? What series are most representative of early educational television in the United States?
To get started:

Example Tweets:

“We’re teaming up with @amarchivepub and #PubMedia50 stations to celebrate #PubMedia! Join in and share your history & content!”

“We’re joining @amarchivepub in celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act at #PubMedia50!”

Instagram/Facebook Post:

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, we’ll be posting content to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! Teaming up with @amarchivepub, #PubMedia50 stations, academics, and community members we’ll have a new #PubMedia50 theme each week. Join the conversation by tagging your post with #PubMedia50.

  • You can follow us here:

Instagram: @amarchivepub

Facebook: @amarchivepub

Twitter: @amarchivepub

Week Two of #PubMedia50: Radio Broadcasting

A Month-long Celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50th Anniversary

Last week we started our month-long commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson on November 7, 1967. We’re joining in with other public broadcasters and organizations such as PBS, NPR, CPB and APTS to celebrate this momentous milestone in our history.

Thanks to those who participated in sharing their unique personal and institutional histories surrounding the history and preservation of public broadcasting with our first week of ‘Firsts’ and Major Ideas of Public Broadcasting.

We learned so much from your archives and we look forward to this coming week’s theme: Radio Broadcasting!

The goal of each challenge is to engage in community, discover histories, share those stories with the public, and start dialogues. Get the theme beforehand by contacting our Engagement and Use Manager, Ryn Marchese at ryn_marchese@wgbh.org, or check out our social pages on Mondays!

You can tune-in to the campaign by posting on Thursdays! We invite public broadcasting organizations, museums, archives, libraries, historians, public media fans, and other cultural organizations to personalize #PubMedia50 and share the stories in your own holdings and memories.

As for us, we’ll be posting content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting every day. Don’t miss a beat and let us know what you think!

See you there!

Week 2 | Post content on November 9th (Th): Radio Broadcasting 

Who was the voice behind the mic? Who are some local radio pioneers in your community? What local and national radio pioneers inspired you or your institutions? What historic radio materials can you share from your archives this week?
To get started:

Example Tweets:

“We’re teaming up with @amarchivepub and #PubMedia50 stations to celebrate #PubMedia! Join in and share your history & content!”

“We’re joining @amarchivepub in celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act at #PubMedia50!”

Instagram/Facebook Post:

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, we’ll be posting content to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! Teaming up with @amarchivepub, #PubMedia50 stations, academics, and community members we’ll have a new #PubMedia50 theme each week. Join the conversation by tagging your post with #PubMedia50.

  • You can follow us here:

Instagram: @amarchivepub

Facebook: @amarchivepub

Twitter: @amarchivepub

 

Library and WGBH Acquire Historic TV Coverage of Senate Watergate Hearings

Digital Files Now Available on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting Website

Press Contact: Sheryl Cannady, Library of Congress, (202) 707-6456 | Emily Balk, WGBH, (617) 300-5317
Public Contact: Alan Gevinson, Library of Congress, (202) 707-0582 | Karen Cariani, WGBH, (617) 300-4286
Website: “Gavel-to-Gavel”: The Watergate Scandal and Public Television External

The Library of Congress and Boston public broadcaster WGBH announced today that gavel-to-gavel television coverage of the Senate Watergate hearings in 1973, donated to the Library by WETA Washington, D.C., has been digitally preserved and made available online.  Produced by the National Public Affairs Center for Television (NPACT), the hearings were taped during the day and rebroadcast every evening on public television for 51 days, from May 17 to Nov. 15. These broadcasts became one of the most popular series in public broadcasting history.

For the first time in 44 years, these riveting moments in history will once again be available to the American public through an online presentation—“Gavel-to-Gavel: The Watergate Scandal and Public Television”—on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) website at americanarchive.org. AAPB is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH to preserve and make accessible significant at-risk public media.

The presentation will provide access to all the coverage, a highlights reel, episode guide and an essay putting the coverage into historical perspective. Visitors to the online exhibit—curated by 2017 Library of Congress Junior Fellow Amanda Reichenbach—will see firsthand the memorable personalities involved in this national drama and the revelations that ultimately led to resignation of President Richard Nixon. Journalists Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer worked together for the first time as anchors to bring balanced commentary, allowing viewers to experience the full hearings and make their own informed opinions.  The coverage became a model for public television and, later, C-SPAN.

Each episode of the coverage begins with about five minutes of commentary by MacNeil and Lehrer, including a recap of what happened during that day’s hearing. The hearings range from two to seven hours in length. The anchors close out with a 10- to 20-minute wrap-up with experts and interviews conducted by correspondent Peter Kaye. The Senate Watergate Committee conducted its investigation in three phases: Watergate (May 17–Sept. 25), Campaign Practices or “Dirty Tricks” (Sept. 26–Nov. 6) and Campaign Finance (Nov. 7–Nov. 15). Coverage by NPACT of the subsequent House impeachment hearings in May and July 1974 also has been digitized and made available online.

After acquiring the tapes, the Library digitized nearly 352 hours of NPACT’s continuous coverage. The digital content was transferred to WGBH for inclusion in AAPB. Nearly a third of AAPB’s complete collection of 50,000 hours of preserved public TV and radio content is now available online for research, educational and informational purposes.

WGBH Boston is America’s pre-eminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the web, including “Masterpiece,” “Antiques Roadshow,” “Frontline,” “Nova,” “American Experience,” “Arthur” and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle and children’s series. WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind or visually impaired. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards and two Oscars. Find more information at wgbh.org.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Announcement: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-17-167/library-and-wgbh-acquire-historic-tv-coverage-of-senate-watergate-hearings/2017-11-03/

Tune-In with #PubMedia50

A Month-long Celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50th Anniversary

Happy UNESCO World Day for Audiovisual Heritage! What better day than today to kick-off our month-long commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson on November 7, 1967. We’re joining in with other public broadcasters and organizations such as PBS, NPR, CPB and APTS to celebrate this momentous milestone in our history.

To celebrate the anniversary, we’re inviting you to a five-week social media campaign encouraging institutions and individuals to share their unique personal and institutional histories surrounding the history and preservation of public broadcasting.

Every week beginning in November 2017, we’ll issue a new #PubMedia50 challenge. The goal of each challenge is to engage in community, discover histories, share those stories with the public, and start dialogues. Get the theme beforehand by contacting our Engagement and Use Manager, Ryn Marchese at ryn_marchese@wgbh.org, or check out our social pages on Mondays!

Tune-in on Thursdays! We invite public broadcasting organizations, museums, archives, libraries, historians, public media fans, and other cultural organizations to personalize #PubMedia50 and share the stories in your own holdings and memories.

As for us, we’ll be posting content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting every day. Don’t miss a beat and let us know what you think!

But we’ll give you a sneak peek, here’s the theme to Week One!

Week 1 | Post your content on November 2nd (Th): Firsts and Major Ideas 

(First Broadcasts/ First Broadcasters / Major Contributors / Major Ideas)

Share your ‘firsts’! What was the first public broadcasting program or series you watched? When did your station go on the air? Who were the major supporters and early pioneers that led to the development of public broadcasting in the United States? What ideas inspired the formation of public broadcasting and public programming? What are the earliest and most significant public broadcasting content and records in your collections?

  • To get started:

Example Tweets:

“We’re teaming up with @amarchivepub and #PubMedia50 stations to celebrate #PubMedia! Join in and share your history & content!”

“We’re joining @amarchivepub in celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act at #PubMedia50!”

Instagram/Facebook Post:

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, we’ll be posting content to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! Teaming up with @amarchivepub, #PubMedia50 stations, academics, and community members we’ll have a new #PubMedia50 theme each week. Join the conversation by tagging your post with #PubMedia50.

  • You can follow us here:

Instagram: @amarchivepub

Facebook: @amarchivepub

Twitter: @amarchivepub

PubMedia

(Photo: Yoichi Okamoto, LBJ Library)

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: The Medicine Game

Vision Maker Media’s “Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks” promotion concludes this week with our final featured Vision Maker Media film.

“The Medicine Game” follows the story of brothers from the Onondaga Nation who pursue their dreams of playing lacrosse for Syracuse University. With their dream nearly in reach, the boys are caught in a constant struggle to define their Native identity, live-up to their family’s expectations and balance challenges on and off the Reservation.

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Watch “The Medicine Game” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Vision Maker Media would like to thank all the viewers who tuned in to stream 40 Years. 40 Films. 40 Weeks. In the last 40 years, the organization has created more than 500 films, awarded $11 million to independent producers and held hundreds of film-screening events across the nation. While only a portion of that was able to be shared in the last 40 weeks, Vision Maker Media hopes that these films have inspired viewers to look at the world through Indigenous eyes.

The AAAPB has been proud to collaborate with Vision Maker Media to share these films and celebrate the amazing work done by Vision Maker Media over the past forty years.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, http://www.visionmakermedia.org

Summer in the City: Farmers’ Markets and Their Origins

As an intern at the American Archive of Public Broadcasting at WGBH, I am living in Boston for the first time. I’ve decided to make it my goal to explore the city and since it’s summertime, the sun is out and beckoning the city’s inhabitants to head outside. One popular activity is frequenting the farmers’ markets that Boston has to offer! The City of Boston reports that it handles almost thirty markets, but that number doesn’t even include the numerous markets that are in the surrounding suburbs. But when did farmers’ markets become so popular? We might take their existence for granted now, but they haven’t always had the thriving customer base they do today. Looking through content at the American Archive of Public Broadcasting, we can see how farmers’ markets have evolved throughout the years.

In July of 1978, a Boston WGBH production called GBH Journal presented a story about a farmers’ market in Dorchester. In the story, the reporter explains how the markets provide benefits for both the farmers and the buyers. For example, the farmers can “bypass the middle person” and the consumers pay “less for their produce and also get fresh, nutritious vegetables and fruits for their money.” The program also describes how farmers’ markets aid the economy in Massachusetts by providing an economic boost for struggling farmers and an affordable food source for lower-income citizens. This same farmers’ market in Dorchester still runs today at Fields Corner every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Farmers’ markets continued to grow in popularity throughout the country, and in 2007, Tampa public broadcasting station WEDU ran a storyScreen Shot 2017-06-30 at 11.55.36 AM about a popular market in Sarasota, Florida on its series Gulf Coast Journal with Jack Perkins. Featured is a local citrus farmer, Tim Brown of Brown’s Grove Citrus and Produce. Brown talks about the high quality of his family’s produce, emphasizing its freshness: “the citrus that we pick on Friday night is on the street Saturday morning.” Tony Souza from the Downtown Partnership of Sarasota explains the market’s popularity in the clip, stating that “the locals come up because it’s the thing to do.” Throughout the story, the program highlights the community involvement found at farmers’ markets as a main attraction. Like the Dorchester market in Boston, the Sarasota farmers’ market still runs every Saturday. The Brown family even still sells their produce.

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To understand why farmers’ markets are popular today, it is helpful to understand how organic and small farmers gained prevalence in an industry that favors corporate, high-quantity producers. In September of 2004 at Washington State University, Northwest Public Television recorded a presentation by the former Executive Director of the Organic Farming Research Foundation (OFRF), Bob Scowcroft. In this talk, Scowcroft discusses how the OFRF assisted in bringing national attention to organic farming, citing press interviews, conferences, and researching for grants as key factors to its success. He also reads a passage from a 1970 LIFE magazine, quoting “the ideas are simple and appealing: we eat too much, mostly of the wrong things; our food comes to us not as nature intended, but altered by man during both growth and processing.” As a pioneer in organic farming, Scowcroft offers insight to how organic, small farming has grown throughout the years and the challenges it still faces.

Today, farmers’ markets continue to flourish. In 1978, public broadcasting aimed to inform the public about the basic facts of farmers’ markets. Thirty years later in 2007, public broadcasting instead demonstrated how farmers’ markets had become a community staple where people from different backgrounds could come together to support the local economy. These markets remain an excellent way to learn, explore, and enjoy a variety of unique and vibrant cultural areas all over the United States and even beyond its borders.

hannah_gore_headshotThis post was written by Hannah Gore, AAPB Intro to Media Archives Intern and student at Dickinson College.

Forty Years through Women’s Healthcare

As lawmakers currently decide the future of American healthcare, many politicians and organizations are seizing the opportunity to express their own sentiments on the subject. A particularly hot topic has been how the new law will affect women, which has long been a controversial subject in the United States. The modern women’s healthcare movement has its roots in the figure of Margaret Sanger. Though she had to take temporary asylum in Europe after illegally distributing contraceptive information, Sanger eventually established the modern-day Planned Parenthood in 1921. To learn more about the evolution of women’s healthcare, content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting facilitates an analysis of how public opinion of healthcare has developed over the last forty years.

In the 70s, WNScreen Shot 2017-06-22 at 12.05.17 PMED of Buffalo, N.Y. produced a series of interviews entitled “Woman.” On Dec. 4, 1975, WNED recorded an episode with breast cancer advocate Rose Kushner. Interviewed by Sandra Elkin, Kushner criticizes the routine medical practices taken in treatment of breast cancer in the United States. Instead, she praises the practices of other countries with nationalized healthcare systems: “There is a big difference in countries where medicine is nationalized,” she explains. For context, a timeline by PBS reports that in the 70s, healthcare was “seen as in crisis” due to the quickly rising costs.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 1.06.18 PMAbout twenty years later in 1992, healthcare costs continued to rise due to economic inflation. On July 29, Kojo Nnmadi hosted a group of four women to speak on his WHUT-produced program, Evening Exchange, in Washington, D.C. The guests included physician Maggie Covington, naturopathologist Andrea Sullivan, president of the National Black Women’s Health project Julia Scott, and president of the Black Lesbian Support Group Cindy Smith. In the program, Scott explains her view that minority women do not receive enough care in medicine, stating that “there is a lot happening in our society that has to do with racism and classicism that makes poor women be much more ill than other segments of the population.” The program ends with the conclusion that women need greater representation in the healthcare system, as Cindy Smith asserts “it’s still a man’s world.”

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 2.08.15 PMAnother twenty years later, President Barack Obama signed into existence his healthcare reform bill in 2010. In a 2013 Louisiana Public Broadcasting broadcast, Donna Fraiche speaks at the Baton Rotary Club on the now three-year-old Affordable Care Act. Although moving away from the lens of the female experience, she details the high costs of American healthcare. Notably, Fraiche outlines that “we’re the richest country in the world, but we spend the most of our dollars on healthcare.” Her knowledge of Japan allows her to explain the differences in the American and Japanese systems, since she served as honorary consul-general of Japan for New Orleans.

Today, this passion for a stronger healthcare system thrives as the American people continue the journey to find a system that is beneficial for our country. Though laws and politics may continue to change, history affirms our dedication towards bettering our medical care. In these programs, the women all had drastically different perspectives and backgrounds, ranging from writers to lawyers to advocates. Yet, they all provided information that helped to develop and challenge public notions of healthcare in the United States.

This post was written by Hannah Gore, AAPB Intro to Media Archives Intern and student at Dickinson College.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Waterbuster

“My grandmother rarely spoke of the days of the Garrison Dam and the flooding of our ancestral lands, but when she did, she always spoke of what lay below as her true home. I have come back here to reclaim that home and what was denied to my generation and all the generations that will follow.”

In this week’s featured Vision Maker Media film, producer J. Carlos Peinado returns to his grandmother’s home on the Fort Berthold Reservation, which was flooded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1947 for the building of the Garrison Dam. “Waterbuster” explores the aftermath of the flooding through the perspective of the displaced Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara people, giving light to a portrait of resilience and survival in the face of catastrophic change.

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Watch “Waterbuster” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Aleut Story

Follow the incredible story of the Aleuts’ decades-long struggle for human and civil rights in this week’s featured Vision Maker Media film, “Aleut Story.”

In 1942, as World War II reached Alaska, Aleut Americans were transferred to government camps 1,500 miles away, where an estimated 10 percent perished. The surviving Aleuts eventually joined Japanese Americans in seeking wartime reparations from the federal government. Narrated by Martin Sheen and featuring an original music score by composer Alan Koshiyama, this poignant, richly textured film contains rare archival images and compelling interviews with Aleut internment survivors — many of whom are speaking out for the first time in more than 60 years.

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Watch “Aleut Story” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.