Join the American Archive Meet-Ups

We’re organizing a meet-up among the American Archive team and participating stations and organizations to talk about issues related to archiving, digital file management, storage and preservation best practices, metadata, working with volunteers and interns, and other archival-related topics that participants want to discuss. The meet-ups will be very informal and will provide an opportunity for stations to gather feedback from the American Archive team and learn about how others are preserving their stations’ archives.

We’ll be organizing the meet-ups as small groups on a rotating schedule so that we can maintain an ease of conversation during the phone calls. If you’re interested in joining a group, please fill out the form and we’ll get in touch with you to let you know who is in your group and when we’ll be meeting.

Update your bookmarks for the AMS!

The team at AudioVisual Preservation Solutions (AVPS) has just completed their contract with the American Archive to build the Archival Management System (AMS). The AMS is a database where stations can access their records created during the Content Inventory Project and view the files that have been digitized through the American Archive Digitization Project.

The new URL for the AMS is ams.americanarchive.org. Please update your bookmarks accordingly.

We have also created several guides to help you and your staff navigate the AMS, which you can find here.

AMSguide3

PBS Annual Meeting Presentation & Takeaways

The American Archive team from WGBH presented at the PBS Annual Meeting in San Francisco. We had the wonderful opportunity to meet many of our station collaborators in person and gather tremendously useful feedback from participants. Many thanks to all of those who attended the session and reception, as well as those who took the time to meet with us at other moments during the conference. Additionally, we are sincerely grateful to our co-presenters, Sandy Schonning from KQED and Laura Sampson from Rocky Mountain PBS’ Stations Archived Memories program.

Below we’ve provided our Annual Meeting slideshow, divided into three sections: 1) history and progress of the American Archive, 2) stories from stations, and 3) discussion. During the discussion section, we asked a series of questions, and in this version of the presentation you will find a summary of the answers. If your organization is participating in the American Archive, please feel free to comment on this post with your answers to these questions (or questions about these questions!).

Feel free to email any of our session presenters:

Karen Cariani, Director
WGBH Media Library & Archives
karen_cariani [at] wgbh [dot] org

Casey E. Davis, Project Manager, American Archive
WGBH Media Library & Archives
casey_davis [at] wgbh [dot] org

Laura Sampson, Rocky Mountain PBS
Stations Archived Memories 

laurasampson [at] me [dot] com

Sandy Schonning, KQED
sschonning [at] kqed [dot] org

Join us at the American Archive reception!

The American Archive team will be in San Francisco at the PBS Annual Meeting. We hope that you will join us on Tuesday, May 13th to discuss the American Archive at your station, hear about the project’s latest activities, and most importantly, to give us your feedback!

We’ll be presenting a concurrent session titled “American Archive of Public Broadcasting: Preservation through Collaboration” on Tuesday, May 13th at 3:45pm in Yerba Buena Ballroom Area 20. Presenters will include Project Director Karen Cariani, Project Manager Casey Davis, and collaborators at two American Archive participating stations — Leslie Bourgeois, Archivist at Louisiana Public Broadcasting and Sandy Schonning, Director of TV Production at KQED.

Following the session, join us for an American Archive casual reception in Foothill B (second floor) from 4:30-6:00pm. Refreshments will be served.

If you plan to attend, please let us know by contacting casey_davis [at] wgbh.org. If colleagues from your station are also attending, please take a moment to connect us with them via email. You are all welcome!

If you have any topics or questions that you would like for us to address in the concurrent session, please comment on this post or email them to Casey at the address provided above.

See you in San Francisco!

PBCore is Back in Action!

PBCore is back in action! As part of the American Archive initiative, WGBH in collaboration with the Library of Congress has been charged with further developing PBCore (Public Broadcasting Metadata Dictionary). The goals of the project are to:

  • Strategize direction for the PBCore schema
  • Improve the PBCore website
  • Solicit submissions from the public
  • Vote on submissions to improve PBCore
  • Develop resources and provide learning opportunities for organizations interested in using PBCore
  • Encourage and support the use of the standard

As the work progresses in the next few months, you’ll be seeing a lot of changes to the PBCore website and a lot of activity on the PBCore blog. So stay tuned for a new and improved website, schema, and a variety of new resources that will help your organization adopt and use PBCore!

The project is being coordinated the American Archive of Public Broadcasting project team. To form the PBCore Advisory Subcommittee, WGBH’s Project Manager Casey Davis reached out to public media stakeholders from universities, archives, and industry to assemble a group of 42 people, who will work in four groups:

Website  (http://pbcore.org/)

  • Review the PBCore website and other standards websites
  • Identify ways in which the website can be improved and become more user-friendly
  • Review existing record examples and create new examples for the website

Schema Development

  • Gather input from the PBCore Advisory Subcommittee for ideas on schema improvement
  • Consider suggestions provided by the community
  • Develop and implement revisions to the schema
  • Explore opportunities for EBUCore harmonization and RDF implementation

Communications

  • Create the PBCore newsletter
  • Provide updates to organizations and listservs
  • Gather schema development submissions from the public
  • Implement a strategy for communication and outreach to adopters and potential adopters
  • Manage the PBCore blog (http://pbcoreresources.org/)

Education

  • Create, communicate, and disseminate effective learning opportunities for PBCore adopters and potential adopters
  • Develop resources that will be shared on the blog and website, ie FAQs
  • Create instructional videos and conduct webinars
  • Strategize other opportunities for teaching the standard

We’re proud to have such a professionally diverse group of contributors to the project. Members include:

Steering Team
Jack Brighton, Illinois Public Media
Karen Cariani, WGBH
Casey E. Davis, WGBH
Dave MacCarn, WGBH
Kara Van Malssen, AVPreserve
Lauren Sorensen, Library of Congress
Anne Wootton, PopUp Archive

Education
Chair: Anne Wootton, PopUp Archive
Caitlin Birch, Frontline | WGBH
Jessica Bitely, Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC)
Kevin Carter, WGBH
Nick Connizzo, George Washington University
Jeremy Meserve, Belmont Media Center
Bill Nehring, Simmons College | MLIS Candidate
Nancy Watrous, Chicago Film Archive

Schema Development
Chair: Kara Van Malssen, AVPreserve
Margaret Bresnahan, Minnesota Public Radio
Glenn Clatworthy, PBS
Tom Davenport, Folkstreams
Glynn Edwards, Stanford University
Jean-pierre Evain, EBUCore
Leigh Grinstead, LYRASIS
Jimi Jones, Hampshire College
Steve Knoblock, Folksreams
Devon Landes, HBO
Andrea Leigh, Library of Congress
Dave MacCarn, WGBH
Mary Miller, Peabody Awards
John Passmore, WNYC-FM
Allison Smith, Wisconsin Public Radio
Adam Wead, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Leah Weisse, WGBH

Website
Chair: Lauren Sorensen, Library of Congress
Jolene Beiser, Pacifica Radio Archives
Ashley Blewer, University of South Carolina
Nestor Cordova, University of Texas
Jeff Eastman, IMF
Ryan Edge, University of Illinois
Andrew Myers, WGBH
Alexander Papson, University of Notre Dame
Dave Rice, City University of New York
Deanna Ulvestad, Greene County Public Library
Anne Wilkens, Wisconsin Public Television

Communications
Chair: Jack Brighton, Illinois Public Media
Casey Davis, WGBH
Karma Foley, Smithsonian Channel
Bailey Smith, PopUp Archive
Jenny Swadosh, New School

There’s a lot of work to do, and we need your help to make this happen. We want to see PBCore in the wild. How do you use PBCore? What challenges do you have? Let us know in the comment section here or by email, and let’s make PBCore better together.

This post was written by Bailey Smith, Co-founder of PopUp Archive and PBCore Communications Team Secretary.

American Archive Ceremony & “The Atlantic” articles

On February 10, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting hosted an event celebrating the American Archive, which took place in the marvelous Great Hall of the Thomas Jefferson Building at the Library of Congress. The ceremony featured speeches by CPB’s President and CEO Patricia Harrison, Librarian of Congress Dr. James Billington, WGBH’s President and CEO Jon Abbott, and Senator Ed Markey. Check out CPB’s photo gallery of the event on their Facebook page: http://ow.ly/uu80k. Earlier that day, the American Archive teams from WGBH and the Library of Congress met in a day-long meeting to discuss our progress on the current project as well as plans for moving forward.

Over the past couple of months, the American Archive team has collaborated with Senior Associate Editor of The Atlantic Becca Rosen (@beccarosen) on a series of online articles spotlighting the American Archive of Public Broadcasting, which launched in conjunction with the American Archive ceremony.

The Atlantic series began with an introduction and overview of the project (and had more than 6,000 Facebook shares!), which you can read here: The Race to Save America’s Public-Media History.

Below are links to the articles that have since followed, each featuring a clip from the collection contributed by a participating station:

1. Listen to the Boston Symphony Orchestra Stop a Performance to Announce JFK’s Assassination

2. Thurgood Marshall: The Constitution Had to Be ‘Corrected’

3. Patty Griffin, Before Anyone Had Heard of Her

4. Julia Child ‘Edits’ Videotape

5. Eleanor Roosevelt Talks to John F. Kennedy About the Status of Women in Society

6. Not Exactly Jimmy Fallon

7. Newly Digitized Footage Reveals an RFK Speech One Week Before His Assassination

8. Beyond ‘the Dream’: The Lesser Known Moments of the March on Washington

9. Video: Ronald Reagan’s Press Conference After ‘Bloody Thursday’

10. A Glimpse Into 1970s Gay Activism

11. The Courir de Mardi Gras 

Three more articles will be published as part of the series, and we will add links to each of those on the page above titled “Media.”

This post was written by Casey E. Davis, Project Manager for the AAPB at WGBH.Casey-headshot

WBEZ Radio Interview with American Archive Project Director Karen Cariani

WBEZ‘s The Morning Shift interviewed our American Archive Project Director and WGBH Media Library and Archives Director Karen Cariani about the American Archive initiative yesterday morning.

You can listen to the full radio interview here (it starts at around 00:54:45):

Many thanks to WBEZ’s The Morning Shift host Tony Sarabia and Director Jason Marck for reaching out to us and highlighting the project on the show!

Onward toward the 5,000 hour goal

I hope that you all enjoyed wonderful holidays with family and friends, and my best wishes to you and yours for a happy and prosperous New Year 2014.

Now that the holidays are over, we are excited to start moving forward with the addition of 5,000 more hours of born-digital or previously digitized materials to the American Archive. Several stations have committed to contributing material, and we are already more than halfway to our goal!

If your station participated in the American Archive Pilot Project, managed by Oregon Public Broadcasting in 2009, we would love to include the materials digitized in that project in our selection. Please email me if you would like to contribute those files and/or other digital files that you would like preserved with the American Archive collection.

If your station did not participate in the Pilot Project, but you do have born-digital or previously digitized material that you would like to contribute, please send me an email letting me know an approximate number of hours of audio/video files you want to submit and whether the files were included in your Content Inventory.

The process will be very simple.

For materials included in the Content Inventory:

If the materials you want to submit were included in your Content Inventory, then you can send me a list of GUIDs (American Archive unique identifiers, which are found with in record in the AMS), or a list of local ID’s you assigned to your assets in the inventory. I can easily batch nominate the materials for you. You could also nominate the materials yourself (it’s really easy, and I can show you how).

For materials not included in the Content Inventory:

If the files you want to contribute were not included in your Content Inventory, then we would just need a CSV file that contains the same information about each asset that was asked for during the Content Inventory Project:

  • Identifier
  • Identifier Source
  • Series Title
  • Program Title
  • Genre
  • Source of Genre
  • Unique ID
  • Unique ID Source
  • Format (digital)
  • Generation
  • Duration
  • Location

[Click here to download a sample CSV file.]

Upon receipt of the CSV (or PBCore XML), we could batch ingest the metadata into the AMS and nominate the records for you.

For materials digitized in the Pilot Project:

If you are interested in contributing files digitized in the Pilot Project, then good news — we already have the metadata and can ingest it into the system for you! In this case, all you would need to do is put the files on the drive and ship it to Crawford Media Services.

What happens after the assets are nominated:

Once the materials have been nominated in the AMS, we would ship you a hard drive on which you would put the files and ship them to Crawford. Crawford would keep the file you sent as the preservation file and would create a proxy, or access file. The preservation files would be sent to the Library of Congress for long-term preservation as part of the American Archive Collection, and the access files would stream through the AMS. Rights permitting, the files would be made available on the American Archive website after it goes live by March 2015.

Please email me at casey_davis [at] wgbh [dot] org if you are interested or if you have any questions.

This post was written by Casey E. Davis, Project Manager for the AAPB at WGBH.