AAPB Webinar Series with the Boston Library Consortium

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This past March, the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) hosted two webinars with the Boston Library Consortium. This two-part webinar series provided an overview on the AAPB as well as review ways in which it can be effectively used as a resource for teaching and research.

Part I – “Accessibility of AAPB in Academic Libraries”
This webinar covered AAPB’s background, governance and infrastructure. Casey Kaufman, AAPB Project Manager, and Ryn Marchese, AAPB Engagement and Use Manager, discussed the scope, content and provenance of the AAPB collection; methods of searching, navigating, and accessing content in the AAPB; examples of the types of materials available in the AAPB collection, and the scholarly and research value of audiovisual collections and specifically public media archives.

Slides available: https://www.slideshare.net/RynMarchese/blc-webinar-part-1-accessibility-of-aapb-for-academic-libraries

 

In this webinar, panelists Casey Kaufman (WGBH), Ingrid Ockert (Princeton University), and Mark Williams (Dartmouth College), explored specific use cases for librarians and researchers in accessing and making use of the AAPB collection. They included a general overview of how scholars and researchers are seeking to use digital AV collections, a brief recap of how AAPB provides access to its collection to researchers and the general public, incorporating AAPB into subject-specific LibGuides, use of audiovisual collections in traditional historical research and in academic coursework, and examples of how AAPB metadata and transcripts can be used in digital humanities research and data mining.

Slides available: https://blc.org/sites/default/files/BLC_Uploads/Part%20II_BLCs%20AAPB%20Webinars_Speaker%20Slides.pdf

 

Special thanks to Jessica Hardin and Susan Stearns of the Boston Library Consortium for helping organizing this series!

Celebrate Women’s History Month by Preserving Women’s Voices in Public Media

One of the most fascinating aspects of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is discovering how local broadcasting stations used their platforms to communicate national issues to local audiences.

As second-wave feminism gained momentum between the years 1960 to 1980, WNED from Buffalo, New York documented the movement’s ripple effect in a half-hour public affairs talk show series titled Woman.  Syndicated by over 200 PBS stations during the years 1973-1977, Woman was the only year-round, national public television forum where a wide variety of national experts provided perspectives on the (then) evolving world of women’s history.

To celebrate this milestone in women’s public media history, the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) launched a new Special Collection featuring the Woman series! Over 190 episodes are available online via the AAPB website: http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/woman-series.

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Woman Series, WNED – Buffalo, NY (1973-1977)

The AAPB invites you to celebrate Women’s History Month by helping preserve and make accessible six Woman transcripts. We’re launching a demo-version of our *NEW* transcript editor tool FIX IT+, a line-by-line editing platform initially developed by the New York Public Library. The six featured interviews include conversations with Gloria Steinem (editor and co-founder of Ms. Magazine), Dorothy Pitman Hughes (African American activist and co-founder of Ms. Magazine), Betty Friedan (author of The Feminine Mystique), Nora Ephron (editor for Esquire magazine and the author of the best-selling book Crazy Salad), Marcia Ann Gillespie (editor-in-chief of Essence Magazine and a board member of Essence communications), Connie Uri, M.D. (on the National Board of Research on the Plutonium Economy and the advisory board of NASC, the Native American Solidarity Committee), and Marie Sanchez (Chief Judge of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, member of the Indian Women United for Social Justice).

These transcripts will be made available online through the AAPB’s website, allowing women’s voices in public media to be more readily searchable and accessible for future generations.

Below are sample recordings of the six interviews mentioned above. Search the Woman Special Collection for more interviews with activists, journalists, writers, scholars, lawyers, artists, psychologists, and doctors, covering topics such as women in sports, the Equal Rights Amendment, sexuality, marriage, women’s health, divorce, the Women’s Liberation Movement, motherhood, and ageism, among others.

Direct link to FIX IT+: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/

Sample Recordings of Featured Transcripts:

Connie Uri, M.D. and Marie Sanchez, Chief Judge of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/transcripts/cpb-aacip_81-67wm3fxh

Marcia Ann Gillespie, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/transcripts/cpb-aacip_81-69z08t6x

Nora Ephron, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_81-988gttr0

Gloria Steinem, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_81-57np5qgv

Betty Friedan, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_81-9995xhm0

Dorothy Pitman Hughes, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/transcripts/cpb-aacip_81-59c5b5nr

Written by Ryn Marchese, AAPB Engagement and Use Manager

Resources Roundup: AAPB Presentations from 2017 AMIA Conference

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Earlier this month the American Archive of Public Broadcasting staff hosted several workshops at the 2017 Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) conference in New Orleans. Their presentations on workflows, crowdsourcing, and best copyright practices are now available online! Be sure to also check out AMIA’s YouTube channel for recorded sessions.

THURSDAY, November 30th

  • PBCore Advisory Sub-Committee Meeting
    Rebecca Fraimow reported on general activities of the Sub-Committee and the PBCore Development and Training Project. The following current activities were presented:

PBCore Cataloging Tool (Linda Tadic)
PBCore MediaInfo updates (Dave Rice)
ProTrack integration (Rebecca Fraimow)
Updated CSV templates (Sadie Roosa)
PBCore crosswalks (Rebecca Fraimow and Sadie Roosa)

FRIDAY, Dec 1st

Archives that hold A/V materials are at a critical point, with many cultural heritage institutions needing to take immediate action to safeguard at-risk media formats before the content they contain is lost forever. Yet, many in the cultural heritage communities do not have sufficient education and training in how to handle the special needs that A/V archive materials present. In the summer of 2015, a handful of archive educators and students formed a pan-institutional group to help foster “educational opportunities in audiovisual archiving for those engaged in the cultural heritage sector.” The AV Competency Framework Working Group is developing a set of competencies for audiovisual archive training of students in graduate-level education programs and in continuing education settings. In this panel, core members of the working group will discuss the main goals of the project and the progress that has been made on it thus far.

Born-Digital audiovisual files continue to present a conundrum to archivists in the field today: should they be accepted as-is, transcoded, or migrated? Is transcoding to a recommended preservation format always worth the potential extra storage space and staff time? If so, what are the ideal target specifications? In this presentation, individuals working closely with born-digital audiovisual content from the University of North Carolina, WGBH, and the American Folklife Center at the Library of Conference will present their own use cases involving collections processing practices, from “best practice” to the practical reality of “good enough”. These use cases will highlight situations wherein video quality, subject matter, file size and stakeholder expectations end up playing important roles in directing the steps taken for preservation. From these experiences, the panel will put forth suggestions for tiered preservation decision making, recognizing that not all files should necessarily be treated alike.

  • Crowdsourcing Anecdotes

How does the public play a role in making historical AV content accessible? The American Archive of Public Broadcasting has launched two games that engage the public in transcribing and describing 70+ years of audio and visual content comprising more than 50,000 hours.

 THE TOOLS: 

(Speech-to-Text Transcript Correction) FIX IT is an online game that allows the public to identify and correct errors in our machine-generated transcripts. FIX IT players have exclusive access to historical content and long-lost interviews from stations across the country.

AAPB KALDI is a tool and profile for speech-to-text transcription of video and audio, released by the Pop Up Archive and made available on Github at github.com/WGBH/american-archive-kaldi.

(Program Credits Cataloging) ROLL THE CREDITS is a game that allows the public to identify and transcribe information about the text that appears on the screen in so many television broadcasts. ROLL THE CREDITS asks users to collect this valuable information and classify it into categories that can be added to the AAPB catalog. To accomplish this goal, we’ve extracted frames from uncataloged video files and are asking for help to transcribe the important information contained in each frame.

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SATURDAY, Dec 2nd

Digitized collections often remain almost as inaccessible as they were on their original analog carriers, primarily due to institutional concerns about copyright infringement and privacy. The American Archive of Public Broadcasting has taken steps to overcome these challenges, making available online more than 22,000 historic programs with zero take-down notices since the 2015 launch. This copyright session will highlight practical and successful strategies for making collections available online. The panel will share strategies for: 1) developing template forms with standard terms to maximize use and access, 2) developing a rights assessment framework with limited resources (an institutional “Bucket Policy”), 3) providing limited access to remote researchers for content not available in the Online Reading Room, and 4) promoting access through online crowdsourcing initiatives.

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The American Archive of Public Broadcasting seeks to preserve and make accessible significant historical public media content, and to coordinate a national effort to save at-risk public media recordings. In the four years since WGBH and the Library of Congress began stewardship of the project, significant steps have been taken towards accomplishing these goals. The effort has inspired workflows that function constructively, beginning with preservation at local stations and building to national accessibility on the AAPB. Archivists from two contributing public broadcasters will present their institutions’ local preservation and access workflows. Representatives from WGBH and the Library of Congress will discuss collaborating with contributors and the AAPB’s digital preservation and access workflows. By sharing their institutions’ roles and how collaborators participate, the speakers will present a full picture of the AAPB’s constructive inter-institutional work. Attendees will gain knowledge of practical workflows that facilitate both local and national AV preservation and access.

As an increasing number of audiovisual formats become obsolete and the available hours remaining on deteriorating playback machines decrease, it is essential for institutions to digitize their AV holdings to ensure long-term preservation and access. With an estimated hundreds of millions of items to digitize, it is impractical, even impossible, that institutions would be able to perform all of this work in-house before time runs out.  While this can seem like a daunting process, why learn the hard way when you can benefit from the experiences of others? From those embarking on their first outsourced AV digitization project to those who have completed successful projects but are looking for ways to refine and scale up their process, everyone has something to learn from these speakers about managing AV digitization projects from start to finish.

How do you bring together a collection of broadcast materials scattered in various geographical locations across the country? National Education Television (NET), the precursor to PBS, distributed programs nationally to educational television stations from 1954-1972. Although this collection is tied together through provenance, it presents a challenge to processing due to differing approaches in descriptive practices across many repositories over many years. By aggregating inventories into one catalog and describing titles more fully, the NET Collection Catalog will help institutions holding these materials make informed preservation decisions. By its conclusion, AAPB will publish an online list of NET titles annotated with relevant descriptive information culled from NET textual records that will greatly improve discoverability of NET materials for archivists, scholars, and the general public. Examples of specific cataloging issues, including contradictory metadata documentation and legacy records, inconsistent titling practices, and the existence of international version will be explored.

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ABOUT THE AAPB

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and almost 25,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

Announcing ROLL THE CREDITS: Classifying and Transcribing Text with Zooniverse

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Today we’re launching ROLL THE CREDITS, a new Zooniverse project to engage the public in helping us catalog unseen content in the AAPB archive. Zooniverse is the “world’s largest and most popular platform for people-powered research.” Zooniverse volunteers (like you!) are helping the AAPB in classifying and transcribing the text from extracted frames of uncataloged public television programs, providing us with information we can plug directly into our catalog, closing the gap on our sparsely described collection of nearly 50,000 hours of television and radio.

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Example frame from ROLL THE CREDITS

The American people have made a huge investment in public radio and television over many decades. The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) works to ensure that this rich source for American political, social, and cultural history and creativity is saved and made available once again to future generations.

The improved catalog records will have verified titles, dates, credits, and copyright statements. With the updated, verified information we will be able to make informed decisions about the development of our archive, as well as provide access to corrected versions of transcripts available for anyone to search free of charge at americanarchive.org.

In conjunction with our speech-to-text transcripts from FIX IT, a game that asks users to correct and validate the transcripts one phrase at a time, ROLL THE CREDITS helps us fulfill our mission of preserving and making accessible historic content created by the public media, saving at-risk media before the contents are lost to prosperity.

Thanks for supporting AAPB’s mission! Know someone who might be interested? Feel free to share with the other transcribers and public media fans in your life!

Upcoming Webinar: Building AAPB Participation into Digitization Grant Proposals

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Building AAPB Participation into Digitization Grant Proposals: Requirements, Recommendations and Workflows

Tuesday, December 12, 2017
12:00pm ET

Webinar Registration form: https://goo.gl/forms/lWWU5GgFkv09bNFi2
Direct meeting URL: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/aapb_grant-proposals-1/

Curious about getting involved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB)?

Seeking information about the workflows and requirements for contributing digitized content and/or metadata to the AAPB?

Writing a grant proposal and want to explore collaborating with the AAPB to preserve copies of your digitized collections and/or provide an access point to your collections through the AAPB metadata portal?

Then this webinar is for you!

On Tuesday, December 12, 2017 at 12:00pm ET, the AAPB will host a webinar focused on grant writing for digitization and subsequent contribution of digital files and metadata to the AAPB.

By the end of this webinar, participants will gain an understanding of:

  • AAPB’s background and infrastructure,
  • how contributing to the AAPB could benefit your collection
  • steps to becoming an AAPB contributor,
  • metadata and digital file format requirements and recommendations,
  • delivery procedures, and
  • other workflows and considerations for contributing digital files and/or metadata to the AAPB.
  • the value of your collection as part of a national collection and how to express that in a proposal

Attendees will also receive advice on how to incorporate AAPB contribution into their CLIR Recordings at Risk (applications due February 9, 2018!), CLIR Digitizing Hidden Collections, or other grant proposal timelines and work plans.

Fill out this brief form to receive info about future webinars and to receive a webinar meeting invitation sent to your calendar: https://goo.gl/forms/lWWU5GgFkv09bNFi2

Anyone can join the webinar at this URL: http://wgbh1.adobeconnect.com/aapb_grant-proposals-1/

This webinar and future AAPB webinars are generously funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 60 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at the Library of Congress and WGBH, and almost 25,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

Join the Conversation at the 2017 Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) Conference

Next week, American Archive of Public Broadcasting staff are hosting at several workshops on workflows, crowdsourcing, and copyright at the 2017 Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) conference in New Orleans!

Check out sessions and events featuring presentations by AAPB staff below. We hope to see you there! If you are unable to attend the conference, follow along with the conversations on Twitter at #AMIA17!

THURSDAY, November 30th

  • 1pm – 2pm, PBCore Advisory Sub-Committee Meeting
    Rebecca Fraimow will report on general activities of the Sub-Committee and the PBCore Development and Training Project. The following current activities will also be presented:

PBCore Cataloging Tool (Linda Tadic)
PBCore MediaInfo updates (Dave Rice)
ProTrack integration (Rebecca Fraimow)
Updated CSV templates (Sadie Roosa)
PBCore crosswalks (Rebecca Fraimow and Sadie Roosa)

FRIDAY, Dec 1st

  • 3:30 – 4:30 pm, Let the Computer and the Public do the Metadata Work!
    Speakers: Karen Cariani, Senior Director, WGBH Media Library and Archives & AAPB Project Director
    Tali Singer, Pop Up Archive
    Tanya Clement, University of Texas at Austin, School of Information

Archives that hold A/V materials are at a critical point, with many cultural heritage institutions needing to take immediate action to safeguard at-risk media formats before the content they contain is lost forever. Yet, many in the cultural heritage communities do not have sufficient education and training in how to handle the special needs that A/V archive materials present. In the summer of 2015, a handful of archive educators and students formed a pan-institutional group to help foster “educational opportunities in audiovisual archiving for those engaged in the cultural heritage sector.” The AV Competency Framework Working Group is developing a set of competencies for audiovisual archive training of students in graduate-level education programs and in continuing education settings. In this panel, core members of the working group will discuss the main goals of the project and the progress that has been made on it thus far.

  • 4:45 – 5:45 pm, Good Enough to Best, Tiered Born-Digital AV Processing
    Speakers: Rebecca Fraimow, Project Manager, WGBH Media Library and Archives
    Erica Titkemeyer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Julia Kim, Library of Congress

Born-Digital audiovisual files continue to present a conundrum to archivists in the field today: should they be accepted as-is, transcoded, or migrated? Is transcoding to a recommended preservation format always worth the potential extra storage space and staff time? If so, what are the ideal target specifications? In this presentation, individuals working closely with born-digital audiovisual content from the University of North Carolina, WGBH, and the American Folklife Center at the Library of Conference will present their own use cases involving collections processing practices, from “best practice” to the practical reality of “good enough”. These use cases will highlight situations wherein video quality, subject matter, file size and stakeholder expectations end up playing important roles in directing the steps taken for preservation. From these experiences, the panel will put forth suggestions for tiered preservation decision making, recognizing that not all files should necessarily be treated alike.

  • 5:45 – 6:45 pm, Crowdsourcing Anecdotes

Room: Arcadian I

THE QUESTION: How does the public play a role in making historical AV content accessible? The American Archive of Public Broadcasting has launched two games that engage the public in transcribing and describing 70+ years of audio and visual content comprising more than 50,000 hours.

Join us to hear lessons learned, give us feedback on our open source FIX IT game and Zooniverse “ROLL THE CREDITS” project, find out how to build an AV-focused Zooniverse project and make use of recently released speech-to-text Kaldi language models. There might also be New Orleans-themed surprise…

 THE TOOLS: 

(Speech-to-Text Transcript Correction)

Fixit

FIX IT is an online game that allows the public to identify and correct errors in our machine-generated transcripts. FIX IT players have exclusive access to historic content and long-lost interviews from stations across the country. Website: fixit.americanarchive.org.

AAPB KALDI is a tool and profile for speech-to-text transcription of video and audio, released by the Pop Up Archive and made available on Github at github.com/WGBH/american-archive-kaldi.

(Program Credits Cataloging)

Roll

ROLL THE CREDITS is a game that allows the public to identify and transcribe information about the text that appears on the screen in so many television broadcasts. ROLL THE CREDITS asks users to collect this valuable information and classify it into categories that can be added to the AAPB catalog. To accomplish this goal, we’ve extracted frames from uncataloged video files and are asking for help to transcribe the important information contained in each frame.

SATURDAY, Dec 2nd

  • 9:45 – 10:45 am, Put it on your Bucket List: Navigating Copyright to Expose Digital AV Collections at Scale
    Speakers: Casey Davis Kaufman, Associate Director, WGBH Media Library and Archives & Project Manager, American Archive of Public Broadcasting
    Jay Fialkov, Deputy General Counsel, WGBH
    Hope O’Keeffe, Associate General Counsel, Library of Congress

Digitized collections often remain almost as inaccessible as they were on their original analog carriers, primarily due to institutional concerns about copyright infringement and privacy. The American Archive of Public Broadcasting has taken steps to overcome these challenges, making available online more than 22,000 historic programs with zero take-down notices since the 2015 launch. This copyright session will highlight practical and successful strategies for making collections available online. The panel will share strategies for: 1) developing template forms with standard terms to maximize use and access, 2) developing a rights assessment framework with limited resources (an institutional “Bucket Policy”), 3) providing limited access to remote researchers for content not available in the Online Reading Room, and 4) promoting access through online crowdsourcing initiatives.

  • 11am – 12 pm, Building the AAPB: Inter-Institutional Preservation and Access Workflows
    Speakers: Charles Hosale, Special Projects Assistant, WGBH/AAPB
    Leslie Bourgeois, Archivist, Louisana Public Broadcasting
    Ann Wilkens, Archivist, Wisconsin Public Television
    Rachel Curtis, AAPB Project Coordinator, Library of Congress

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting seeks to preserve and make accessible significant historical public media content, and to coordinate a national effort to save at-risk public media recordings. In the four years since WGBH and the Library of Congress began stewardship of the project, significant steps have been taken towards accomplishing these goals. The effort has inspired workflows that function constructively, beginning with preservation at local stations and building to national accessibility on the AAPB. Archivists from two contributing public broadcasters will present their institutions’ local preservation and access workflows. Representatives from WGBH and the Library of Congress will discuss collaborating with contributors and the AAPB’s digital preservation and access workflows. By sharing their institutions’ roles and how collaborators participate, the speakers will present a full picture of the AAPB’s constructive inter-institutional work. Attendees will gain knowledge of practical workflows that facilitate both local and national AV preservation and access.

  • 3:30 – 4:30 pm, Preservation is Painless: A Guide to Outsourced AV Digitization Project Management
    Speakers: Biz Maher Gallo, George Blood Audio/Video/Film/Data
    Charles Hosale, WGBH Media Library & Archives
    Robin Pike, University of Maryland Libraries
    Emily Vinson, University of Houston Libraries
    Rebecca Holte, New York Public Library
    Erica Titkemeyer, UNC Chapel Hill Libraries
    Kimbery Tarr, New York University Libraries

As an increasing number of audiovisual formats become obsolete and the available hours remaining on deteriorating playback machines decrease, it is essential for institutions to digitize their AV holdings to ensure long-term preservation and access. With an estimated hundreds of millions of items to digitize, it is impractical, even impossible, that institutions would be able to perform all of this work in-house before time runs out.  While this can seem like a daunting process, why learn the hard way when you can benefit from the experiences of others? From those embarking on their first outsourced AV digitization project to those who have completed successful projects but are looking for ways to refine and scale up their process, everyone has something to learn from these speakers about managing AV digitization projects from start to finish.

  • Poster Session – Design for Context: Cataloging and Linked Data for Exposing National Educational Television (NET) Content
    Presenters: Sadie Roosa, Project Manager, National Educational Television Collection Catalog Project
    Rachel Curtis, AAPB Project Coordinator, Library of Congress
    Christopher Pierce, Metadata Specialist, Library of Congress

How do you bring together a collection of broadcast materials scattered in various geographical locations across the country? National Education Television (NET), the precursor to PBS, distributed programs nationally to educational television stations from 1954-1972. Although this collection is tied together through provenance, it presents a challenge to processing due to differing approaches in descriptive practices across many repositories over many years. By aggregating inventories into one catalog and describing titles more fully, the NET Collection Catalog will help institutions holding these materials make informed preservation decisions. By its conclusion, AAPB will publish an online list of NET titles annotated with relevant descriptive information culled from NET textual records that will greatly improve discoverability of NET materials for archivists, scholars, and the general public. Examples of specific cataloging issues, including contradictory metadata documentation and legacy records, inconsistent titling practices, and the existence of international version will be explored.

ABOUT THE AAPB

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and almost 25,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

The Library and WGBH Celebrate 50 Years of Preserving Public Television and Radio

The Library of Congress and Boston public broadcaster WGBH will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 with a series of panels featuring pioneers and experts in public broadcasting Friday, Nov. 3, 2 p.m.–6 p.m.  The symposium—“Preserving Public Broadcasting at 50 Years”—will be held in the Montpelier room on the sixth floor of the Library’s James Madison Memorial Building, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, D.C.

The event is free, but tickets are required and there may be special restrictions.  To secure tickets, visit this event-ticketing site: https://preservingat50.eventbrite.com/. 

The event also will be livestreamed on the Library’s Facebook page at facebook.com/libraryofcongress and its YouTube site (with captions) at youtube.com/LibraryOfCongress.

Signed by President Lyndon Johnson, the act established public broadcasting as it is organized today and also authorized the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) to establish and maintain a library and archives of non-commercial educational television and radio programs.  CPB established the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) in 2009 and, in 2013, the Library of Congress and WGBH assumed responsibility of AAPB, coordinating a national effort to preserve and make accessible significant at-risk public media.

A Library report on television and video preservation in 1997 cited the importance of public broadcasting:

“[I]t is still not easy to overstate the immense cultural value of this unique audiovisual legacy, whose loss would symbolize one of the great conflagrations of our age, tantamount to the burning of Alexandria’s library in the age of antiquity.”

The initial AAPB archive, donated by more than 100 public broadcasting stations, contained more than 40,000 hours of content from the early 1950s to the present.  The full collection, now more than 50,000 hours of preserved content, is available on-site to researchers at the Library in Washington, D.C., and WGBH in Boston, Massachusetts.  Nearly a third of the files, however, are now available online for research, educational and informational purposes at http://americanarchive.org.

During the symposium, panelists will examine the history of public broadcasting, the origins of its news and public affairs programming, the importance of preservation and the educational uses of public broadcasting programs for K-12 and college education, scholarship and adult education.  Also highlighted will be some of AAPB’s most significant collections, such as the “PBS NewsHour” and its predecessors, which are currently being digitized for online access, and full interviews conducted for “Eyes on the Prize” and “American Experience” documentaries.

The program schedule is subject to change, but confirmed participants include:

2 p.m. –      Introductions and Welcoming Remarks

  • Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress
  • Jon Abbott, President and CEO, WGBH
  • Patricia Harrison, President and CEO, CPB

2:15 p.m. – Origins                    

  • Nicholas Johnson, FCC commissioner, 1966-73
  • Bill Siemering, NPR co-founder, creator of “All Things Considered”
  • Newton Minow, FCC chairman, 1961-63, via video
  • Ervin Duggan, FCC commissioner (1990-93); President of PBS (1993-99)
  • Cokie Roberts, NPR and MacNeil/Lehrer contributor; AAPB adviser (moderator)

3:10 p.m. –  News and Public Affairs Talk Shows

  • Jim Lehrer, co-anchor, “MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour”
  • Dick Cavett, host of “The Dick Cavett Show,” 1977-1982
  • Cokie Roberts, NPR and MacNeil/Lehrer contributor; AAPB adviser
  • Hugo Morales, co-founder, Radio Bilingüe
  • Sharon Percy Rockefeller, CEO, WETA-TV
  • Judy Woodruff, “PBS NewsHour” (moderator)

 4:10 p.m. – Documentaries: Style and the Use of Archives

  • David Fanning, creator, “FRONTLINE”                              
  • Clayborne Carson, founder and director of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute; senior adviser, “Eyes on the Prize”
  • Stephen Gong, director, Center for Asian American Media
  • Margaret Drain, former executive producer of “American Experience”
  • Patricia Aufderheide, university professor of Communication Studies at American University (moderator)

5:10 p.m. –   Educational Uses of Public Broadcasting

  • Lloyd Morrisett, co-creator, “Sesame Street”
  • Paula Apsell, executive producer of “NOVA”
  • Debra Sanchez, Senior Vice President for Education and Children’s Content                Operations, Corporation for Public Broadcasting
  • Kathryn Ostrofsky, instructor, Angelo State University, Department of History
  • Jennifer Lawson, founding chief programming executive, PBS (moderator)

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

WGBH Boston is America’s pre-eminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the web, including “Masterpiece,” “Antiques Roadshow,” “FRONTLINE,” “NOVA,” “American Experience,” “Arthur,” “Curious George” and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle and children’s series. WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind or visually impaired. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards … even two Oscars. Find more information at www.wgbh.org.

Join Current for “Get with the program!: Shows that shaped public television”

2017 is the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act. Join Current for Get with The Program!: Shows that Shaped Public Television, a series of online events looking at some of the most influential public TV programs of all time. First up: Firing Line, the legendary public affairs program hosted by conservative intellectual William F. Buckley. Watch clips of Firing Line, courtesy of the Hoover Institution Archives, and discuss the impact of this groundbreaking show on American culture and public TV itself. Guests include Heather Hendershot, author of “Open to Debate: How William F. Buckley Put Liberal America on The Firing Line” and former ABC News analyst Jeff Greenfield. This free event is Wednesday, May 24 at 1 pm ET. Reserve your spot here: bit.ly/pba50-firingline.

FiringLine
Image courtesy Hoover Institution Archives

Register for our upcoming webinars

We have two free webinars coming up in January from our AAPB NDSR residents!

Challenges of Removable Media in Digital Preservation (Eddy Colloton)
Thursday, January 12th, 3:00 PM ET

Removable storage media could be considered the most ubiquitous of digital formats. From floppy disks to USB flash drives, these portable, inexpensive and practical devices have been relied upon by all manner of content producers. Unfortunately, removable media is rarely designed with long-term storage in mind. Optical media is easy to scratch, flash drives can “leak” electrons, and floppy disks degrade over time. Each of these formats are unique, and carry with them their own risks. This webinar, open to the public, will focus on floppy disks, optical media, and flash drives from a preservation perspective. The discussion will include a brief description of the way information is written and stored on such formats, before detailing solutions and technology for retrieving data from these unreliable sources.

Register for “Challenges of Removing Media in Digital Preservation”

Demystifying FFmpeg/FFplay (Andrew Weaver)
Thursday, January 26th, 3:00 PM ET

The FFmpeg/FFplay combination is a surprisingly multifaceted tool that can be used in myriad ways within A/V workflows.  This webinar will present an introduction to basic FFmpeg syntax and applications (such as basic file transcoding) before moving into examples of alternate uses.  These include perceptual hashing, OCR, visual/numerical signal analysis and filter pads.

Register for “Demystifying FFmpeg/FFplay”

AAPB Presentation at IFLA News Media Section Conference

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) News Media Section held a two-day satellite session on  “News, New Roles, & Preservation Advocacy: Moving Libraries Into Action” in Lexington, KY on August 10-12, 2016, hosted by the University of Kentucky Libraries. AAPB Library of Congress project director Alan Gevinson participated remotely with a PowerPoint that surveyed news-related materials in the AAPB collections and discussed the project’s history and goals. 

Alan’s full presentation is now available online, and more presentations from the conference can be viewed and downloaded on the University of Kentucky Libraries website.

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View Alan Gevinson’s presentation here: http://uknowledge.uky.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1000&context=ifla-news-media