Eric Saxon, Public Broadcasting Fellow at KOPN

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KOPN’s transmitter, located east of Columbia, MO

Greetings gentle reader, I’m Eric Saxon, a Masters of Information and Library Science student specializing in archives at the University of Missouri – Columbia, and part of the second cohort of the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF). This summer, I embarked on a deep tape diving expedition at the radio station, KOPN.

KOPN 89.5 FM, community radio from Columbia, Missouri, broadcasts to antennas throughout the central part of the state and via online at kopn.org. KOPN has transmitted information and music since 1973 AD. As part of the PBPF mission to record local histories across the nation, I set out to discover Columbia and KOPN as it existed in the first twenty or so years of the station, through a media format heretofore unfamiliar to me, the ¼ in. audio tape reel.

The idea was to give these audio reels new life through digital preservation, and, subsequently, new access points to the history of community radio in Columbia, MO in the era of the ¼ in. magnetic tape.

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A ¼ in. magnetic audio tape reel

What I ended up recording is only a small piece of this history, but the audible trace there tells a story of a community radio station being born out of the progressive ethos of the 1960s, open to and actively exploring all available ideas during the 1970s, and incompletely mutating into new wave ideals of the 1980s. During the era of the magnetic tape, KOPN filled a void in mid-Missouri left by mainstream broadcast radio and television, serving across an intersection of race, class, gender, style, sexuality, attitude, and musical preference.

The collection is particularly strong in broadcasts that represent feminist discourse and practice of the time, and my predecessor (Rebecca Benson, PBPF Spring 2018 Fellow) had already begun work that focused on feminist community radio. Having inherited her excellent start to the project, I built upon the theme and expanded it to include live music broadcasts and a wide range of programming, all under the umbrella of feminist community radio.

To convey an idea of this breadth, some titles of the audio broadcasts I digitized include Betty Friedan in Columbia (1973); Don Cooper Live at KOPN (1973); Consciousness Across the Void (1973); Angela Davis in Columbia (1974); Political Gayness (1974); National Women’s Music Festival (1975); The End of “Alternative Radio” on WGTB (1976); Off Our Backs (1976); The Fabulish Winotones Live (1977); Numerology (1978); The Booty Band: Demo Tape (1978); Reasonably Polite New Wave (1981); Program on Lesbian Separatism (1981); DuChamp Live at the Blue Note (1981); Bella Azbug at MU (1984); Gloria Kaufman, “The Politics of Humor: A Feminist View” (1992);  City Council Meetings; and discussions by the Women’s Health Collective.

I transferred only a few reels from the 1990s to a digital format, and none from the 2000s. (By that time, the station had switched to digital machines.) However, a quick listen to KOPN today will tell you that the community values and open radio format there in the beginning continue to be the guiding forces of the station.

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Kansas City new wave band, DuChamp. Handmade collage on tape reel box.

The digitization process not only transferred content but also often recorded the unique physical characteristics of the tape and its interaction with the reel-to-reel tape machines, which, in the University of Missouri – Columbia KOPN Digitization Station’s case, are the Studer A807 (mono) and the Studer B67 (stereo). These were hooked up to a PC and a Mac desktop computer, respectively, where both utilized the audio editing software, Audacity. I could have removed some tape hiss, a sizzle of magnetic particles here and there, and other imperfections, but I left in all but the most egregious content obfuscators, not only to digitize as much as possible in the time allotted, but also as an aesthetic choice and to preserve the unique qualities of the tape medium itself.

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The Studer A807

Emancipating the tape reels from their media-specific obscurity required multiple other steps, with some reels needing more TLC and resuscitation than others. After vigilant cleaning of the machines between reels, this process might entail repairing splices that popped off during the recording process, adding leader tape to the heads and tails of reels, re-housing tapes with broken parts, periodic demagnetizing of the tape machines, untangling and re-spooling tape that had become curled and twisted, and baking/dehydrating tapes exhibiting “sticky-shed syndrome” where deteriorating binder material becomes unfixed in the tape path and gums up the machine’s moving parts. In addition to the more physical aspects of the project, there was also record creation for each reel, inventory production, metadata researched and added, checksum generation, audio file conversion, and ingest into the mothership servers at WGBH.

Although I worked independently, at every stage I had a network of experts and mentors to turn to when encountering an obstacle, from the immersion week of audiovisual preservation training in Boston to the final handoff of the files. Thanks go out to the amazing folks at WGBH and all involved in immersion week, including George Blood and Jackie Jay for introducing me to legacy A/V equipment, all my fellow Fellows, host mentor Jackie Casteel and everyone at KOPN, faculty mentor Dr. Sarah Buchanan and the scholars at MU’s Allen Institute, local mentor Jim Hone, and every one else involved in this far-reaching project.

Going forward, I’m excited to bring forth more untold and seldom heard stories from their various limbos, utilizing what I learned as a PBPF fellow to help make a more complete historical record that is inclusive of the entire spectrum of human experience.

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Minimal audio preservation setup: computer, reel-to-reel tape machine, human

Written by Eric Saxon, PBPF Summer 2018 Cohort

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About PBPF

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, supports ten graduate student fellows at University of North Carolina, San Jose State University, Clayton State University, University of Missouri, and University of Oklahoma in digitizing at-risk materials at public media organizations around the country. Host sites include the Center for Asian American Media, Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, and KOPN Community Radio. Contents digitized by the fellows will be preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The grant also supports participating universities in developing long-term programs around audiovisual preservation and ongoing partnerships with their local public media stations.

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work.

 

World Teachers’ Day 2018

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World Teachers’ Day is held annually on October 5th to commemorate the signing of the 1966 UNESCO/ILO Recommendation concerning the Status of Teachers. This Recommendation sets benchmarks regarding the rights and responsibilities of teachers and standards for their initial preparation and further education, recruitment, employment, and teaching and learning conditions.

As World Teachers’ Day aims to focus on appreciating, evaluating, and improving the educators of the world, public broadcasting has brought these concerns to the public for further consideration. Here is a brief selection of clips to recognize the ambition of teachers, as well as public broadcasting’s programming as a primary and secondary resource.

Educational Programs Available Online

National Educational Television Special Collection (1952-1972)

net_catalog.jpgThe National Educational Television (NET) Collection consists of more than 10,000 television programs from non-commercial TV stations and producers from 1952-1972 on public affairs, social issues, arts, culture, the humanities, science, and education. The collection includes public affairs documentaries and discussions covering the black freedom struggle, the Vietnam War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and issues such as poverty, student activism, radicalism, privacy, the environment, the elderly, and welfare. The programs in this collection were created for television broadcast, as well as classroom and adult educational uses.

Search the collection: http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/net-catalog

School Desegregation from WGBH’s Say Brother Series (1974)

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This program focuses on school desegregation and the quality of education in Boston 1974. Discussion includes students, parents, and community activists held within Jeremiah E. Burke High School. First program of the 1974 season.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog?q=cpb-aacip%2F15-9gq6r236&utf8=%E2%9C%93&f%5Baccess_types%5D%5B%5D=online

Sex Bias in Education from WNED’s Women Series (1974)

 

 

This episode features a conversation with Judy Wenning and Phyllis AlRoy. Wenning was the former President of NY N.O.W and Coordinator of National NOW Women and Sports Task Force. She was a teacher and worked as a feminist therapist at NY City College and in private practice. AlRoy was a member of “Women on Words and Images,” a feminist consulting firm in Princeton, New Jersey, and is the co-author of “Dick and Jane As Victims.”

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_81-37hqc39r

Denver Public School Prime Time Project from Rocky Mountain PBS (1981)

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This show is from a weekly series to create public awareness of the educational opportunities in the Denver Public Schools and to encourage the cooperative efforts of home and community to achieve excellence in education.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_52-91fj7068

Front Street Weekly: Public vs Private Schooling from Oregon Public Broadcasting (1984)

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In the choice between private and public, this episode focuses on why Oregon parents are choosing private over public school for their children in 1984.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_153-07gqnmcc

Arkansas School for the Deaf from Arkansas Educational TV Network (1994)

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This documentary describes the courses and programs at the Arkansas School for the Deaf. The documentary is composed of interviews with school administrators and teachers, along with footage and photographs of students in classrooms, around campus, and at special events. Transcript included!

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_111-4298sn90

Primary and Secondary Resources in the Archive

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) contains more than 50,000 items of digitized public broadcasting programs and original materials. Over 35,000 items of these programs are available online and the importance of these news casts, raw interviews, documentaries, radio shows etc. serve as primary and secondary sources to American history, both on the local and national level.

Below is AAPB’s Informational Flyer available for download. This flyer gives an overview of the AAPB, its collection, and accessibility to students and teachers.

With over 35,000 items of public radio and television programs from 120 particiation stations, AAPB’s collection captures historical moments across chronological and geographic spectrums. The AAPB staff and guest researchers have curated Exhibits that include coverage of the Watergate hearing, civil rights movements, climate change, and more!

The AAPB has also organized Special Collections that highlight valuable series within collections. These include raw interviews from Eyes on the Prize, Ken Burns’ Civil War Series, and American Expereience documentaries. Often times, only minutes of these interviews make it into the final cut of programs. On the AAPB, the public has access to interviews from start to finish. For example, from the Eyes on the Prize Special Collection, the public can watch Rosa Parks give her account of history between the production crew’s cues and director’s coaching off-screen.

We hope you enjoy and can make use of these resources!

AAPB Informational Flyer

The AAPB Informational Flyer is available for download and contains an overview of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting, its collection, and accessibility in the classroom. Feel free to share with students, teachers, and colleagues!

Download here: AAPB_Informational_Flyer.pdf

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Curated Exhibits

American Archive of Public Broadcasting staff and guest curators have created exhibits of selected recordings that focus on themes, topics, and events of cultural and historical significance. In these exhibits, curators contextualize digitized primary and secondary source public television and radio materials. Each curated set of selected recordings present a diversity of perspectives concerning the exhibit’s focus. As a result, AAPB exhibits often illuminate how public broadcasting stations and producers have covered the exhibit’s theme.

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Special Collections

Some notable collections are featured here in Special Collections. Each Special Collection finding aid provides detailed information about the content, such as its creator, recommended search strategies, and related resources. These are unedited interviews from programs that often only include minutes of the original interviews.

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Written by Ryn Marchese, AAPB Engagement and Use Manager

Mississippi Legends and Luminaries

The collection of programs and interviews contributed to the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) by Mississippi Public Broadcasting holds special meaning to me. Having grown up in the small town of Monticello, Mississippi, many of the people, places and events recorded in programs like Conversations and Mississippi Roads endure as some of the legends of my lifetime. The geographic breadth of the content preserved in the AAPB offers almost anyone an opportunity to watch, listen and explore the history of their community, of their legends, and of their own past.

Allow me to introduce you to some of our Mississippi legends and luminaries, preserved and made available in the AAPB.

Eudora Welty
Born in Jackson, MS in 1909, Eudora Welty was a short story writer and novelist. Beginning her work in 1933 for the Works Progress Administration, her first short story “Death of a Traveling Salesman” was published in 1936. Her 1972 book The Optimist’s Daughter garnered a Pulitzer Prize.  Watch two 30 minute interviews with Eudora Welty in this episode of Conversations (1971)  and in Postscripts (1984).

 

Richard Wright
Richard Wright, born in Roxie, Mississippi — just outside of Natchez — in 1908, was an author of novels and short stories often concerning the plight of African Americans in Mississippi. Among his works are his memoir, Black Boy, and A Native Son. Watch this conversation between poet Margaret Walker and other scholars about Richard Wright in Climate for Genius; A Native Son.

John Grisham
Best known for his legal mysteries and thriller novels, John Grisham was born in 1955 in Jonesboro, Arkansas and moved to Southaven, Mississippi at the age of four. Some of his bestsellers include his first book, A Time to Kill, as well as A Painted House, The Client, A Pelican Brief, The Rainmaker, and The Runaway Jury, all of which have been adapted into films. Watch this conversation with John Grisham from 1995.

Willie Morris
Willie Morris is my favorite of the Mississippi writers. After growing up in Yazoo City, he moved to New York and became the youngest editor of Harper’s Magazine. He later wrote his seminal autobiography, North Toward Home. Other works include My Dog Skip, which was adapted into a feature film, Good Old Boy: A Delta Boyhood, New York Days, Ghosts of Medgar Evers, and Taps, among others. The AAPB has preserved three interviews with Willie Morris. The first was recorded in 1971, soon after he left Harper’s Magazine. Another was recorded in 1997  and was included in a tribute program to Willie Morris shortly after his death in 1999. Lastly, MPB recorded an interview with Willie Morris during the filming of My Dog Skip, shortly before his passing. The film premiered in 2000.

 

Marshall Ramsey
Marshall Ramsey is an editorial cartoonist best known to Mississippians for his works appearing in the statewide newspaper The Clarion Ledger. His cartoons have also been nationally syndicated and have appeared in The New York Times and USA Today. He’s also an author, short story writer, radio personality and television host. Learn more about Ramsey’s artwork in this episode segment of Mississippi Roads.

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I had the opportunity to meet James Meredith at a diner in Jackson, MS in 2013.

James Meredith
James Meredith was born in 1933 in Kosciusko, Mississippi and is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, a figure of the Civil Rights Movement, writer and political advisor. In 1962 he became the first African American student admitted to the University of Mississippi, or Ole Miss. When he returned to Mississippi in 1960 after his service in the military, he initiated his plan to “break the system of white supremacy in Mississippi” by exercising his constitutional right to apply to the University, thereby putting pressure on the Kennedy administration to enforce civil rights. Watch this interview with James Meredith, recorded in 2002 — forty years after he integrated Ole Miss.

 

William Winter
William Winter, born in 1923 in Grenada, MS, served as the 58th Governor of Mississippi from 1980 to 1984. He is known for his strong support of public education, freedom of information, racial reconciliation, and historic preservation. Winter is best remembered for the passage of the Mississippi Education Reform Act, which sought to improve state education and also established public kindergartens. The AAPB includes two interviews with William Winter, one regarding race relations (1998) and another regarding public education (2002).

Mac McAnally
Singer/songwriter and record producer Mac McAnally also makes my list of Mississippi luminaries and legends. Born in Red Bay, Alabama, Mac McAnally spent much of his life in Belmont, Mississippi before becoming a session musician in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Some of my favorite of his singles include “It’s a Crazy World,” “Back Where I come From,” and “Down the Road,” the latter two both made famous by Kenny Chesney. In 2007 he was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and has received nine Country Music Association awards for Musician of the Year. Watch this interview with Mac McAnally on Mississippi Roads (for which he also sings the opening theme of the series).

I could go on with other examples of places and people documented in these MPB recordings that I remember as a Mississippian. Instead, here’s a challenge for you: search the archive at americanarchive.org to find your own local legends and memories documented in the programs. You can narrow your search to a station in your state, or search the records of everything from your state. What do you find? I invite you to share them in the comments of this post or on social media. Remember to tag us at @amarchivepub on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram!

Ben Gogel, Research Assistant on the NewsHour Digitization Project

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Over the last several months, I’ve worked as a Research Assistant at WGBH on the PBS NewsHour Digitization Project. This project involves taking the predecessor programs for the PBS NewsHour, including The MacNeil/Lehrer Report, The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour and The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, and making them available to a wider audience through digitization, preservation, and online access. My specific responsibilities include reviewing the proxy files, or digital copies, of multiple NewsHour episodes and making sure they are presentable (no major audiovisual glitches, complete transcripts, subtitles are legible), and recording the information in an online spreadsheet. This may sound like a straightforward job, but working at WGBH taught me even straightforward jobs can have unpredictable aspects, and I learned a lot about adapting to new challenges and going outside my comfort zone.

Before working on this project, I attended a rigorous Archives Management program at Simmons University, learning about several archival processing practices, chief among them being More Product, Less Process (MPLP). The idea behind MPLP is that, in cases where large amounts of archival content needs to be preserved, the Archivist must focus on processing as many objects as possible. This approach served me well in several real-world internships, including two in different departments at WGBH. The first of these was in the Creative department during the summer of 2015, helping my co-workers not only track data but set up a Google Drive account so as to store it in a spreadsheet. I then parlayed this experience into my Simmons Archives Field Study capstone project in the WGBH Media Library and Archives (MLA). Throughout the winter of 2016, I reviewed and cataloged episodes of regional news magazines produced by the Wyoming PBS and Oregon Public Broadcasting. Between the academic training and real-world experience, I thought I could handle working on the NewsHour Digitization Project, but over time, I found out just how unprepared I was, in the best way possible.

While archives share general principles, every place and department I’ve worked at has its own unique, unpredictable challenges, and the same was true on this project as well. A typical day on the job involves watching NewsHour episodes in bits and pieces, making sure the videos were watchable and their accompanying materials (i.e. transcripts and subtitles) were present and accurate. Most of the time, review has been straightforward, and the clips themselves have occasionally been interesting looks at iconic figures from new perspectives: personal favorites include retrospectives on what would’ve been the 100th birthdays of Alfred Hitchcock and Walt Disney, for example. But there are times where I have been thrown for a loop and needed to adapt.

For clips without transcripts and/or subtitles, I had no choice but to watch them for longer time periods, paying close attention to the audio. This need for paying close attention goes both ways, and there were times during graphic reports (like 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina coverage) where I needed to take small breaks to keep from getting overwhelmed emotionally. Fortunately, my co-workers and supervisor, remembering me from my previous Archives internship, have been remarkably sympathetic and understanding, which helped alleviate this stress, among other worries. The friendly, open atmosphere also encouraged me to branch out and extend a helping hand to them, and new people at WGBH, in kind.

Throughout the summer months, the MLA had several interns join over the summer, and as a welcoming gesture, I sat down with each of them for lunch on their first days, and over the course of their time I offered practical advice whenever I could, most importantly to not rule anything out vis-à-vis future work opportunities. At the same time, I myself was a fresh addition to the audience at several MeetUps and SpeakEasys: one of each a month for promoting and socializing with people from different departments of WGBH. The MeetUps even have a whole minute set aside for the purpose of introducing yourself to strangers, a nice and well-appreciated touch. Between this mentorship and more socially conducive environment, I had a support network that helped me a great deal.

As a kid, two of the biggest things that scared me were thunderstorms and spicy foods, particularly buffalo chicken. I would always stay away from both of them at every possible opportunity, to preserve my anxiety and avoid any kind of discomfort. The last few months had their fair share of stormy heat waves and spicy hot wings, but as with archival work in general, uncomfortable situations can only be avoided for so long. In the end, I had to buck up and accept that summer storms could at least be tolerated, and it helps that my co-workers never treated it as a debilitating setback. As for the spicy foods, that I did have control over, and to set a positive example for the interns, I not only tried buffalo chicken, but also pulled pork covered in Jamaican jerk seasoning. To my surprise, neither one of those foods burned my mouth off or led to searing pain, and this growth can be directly attributed to both my at-work support group and my need/willingness to handle unforeseen archiving circumstances.

Being adaptable to unpredictable elements is the most valuable lesson I learned from this experience. On-the-nose food metaphors aside, my experience with the turbulence in both the clouds and video files forced me out of my comfort zone, but it was all in terms I could understand thanks to my years of real-world experience. In my goal of preserving and making accessible the NewsHour files, I persevered and made myself more accessible as well.

Written by Ben Gogel, https://www.linkedin.com/in/bengogel/

 

 

Riley Griffin, Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellow at GPB

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When we toured WGBH, we took turns holding an Emmy Award trophy (Image: Riley Griffin, author, holding an Emmy Award)

Hi, everyone!  My name is Riley Griffin (xe/xir).  I am just now entering my second year of graduate school in Clayton State University’s Masters of Archival Studies program.  I am the second fellow, after Virginia Angles, to be a part of the American Archives of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF).  My part of the project focused on digitizing Georgia Public Broadcasting’s (GPB) Georgia Gazette under the incredibly trusting supervision of Ellen Reinhardt, Kathy Christensen, and Joshua Kitchens.  I was looking for summer opportunities when a chance at following a career path in my new-found love for preservation presented itself through the AAPBPBPF.  I was overjoyed by the scope of the fellowship, the organizations working with it, and the special collections it included.

Every fellowship starts with certain expectations only to end with different lessons and new perspectives.  At the start of my fellowship, I spent a lot of time comparing. There were a lot of things I was not expecting, my reactions being one of them.  As we visited Boston and learned about all the different types of digital media we could be working with I couldn’t help but begin to feel this sort of jealousy–wishing I could work with as many formats and topics as possible.

Of course, this hunger decreased to a low rumble as I became humbled by the Georgia Gazette materials.  I quickly realized I craved difficulty; so, I became grateful instead of jealous.  In training, we were prepared to scrub and scrub our machines clean, take precious time delicately fixing things, and balance everything to be just perfect.  However, my project was given a bit of grace by being a more modern collection. Digital Audio Tapes (DATs) are often considered one of the most fragile media formats. However, most of them were recorded at a decent quality from the 1990’s to the 2000’s, rewound to the beginning, and left alone and undisturbed in an air-conditioned radio station.  So, please forgive me when I am grateful that the worst of my worries is how many times I dropped the (very loose) pinch roller into the machine that day.

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GPB Digitization Station (Image: Two desks with 2 computers, a DAT machine, cleaning materials, and various electronics everywhere)

The topics of everyone’s materials had me curious, too.  I was wondering what it was like to have video–as my project was only audio–and to have materials like oral histories to work with.  I quickly counted my blessings as I heard what my colleague was working on–images of war, tragedy, death, and disaster. I thanked GPB for having forward attitudes towards topics, reporters who were nearly-emotionless in comparison, and pert news reports.  I am a very sensitive soul and could imagine having to wait the tears out before being able to see what you’re working on. I also realized I was having a hard time with some of the Georgia Gazette material.  One thing I experience as an archivist who moves all over is major culture shock.  I think being an archivist is one of the best ways to learn about the place you have just moved to. But it also exposes you to things much quicker than you expect.

I’m from upstate New York, which has a different demographic and historical context; although I’m not unfamiliar with racism, being deeply embedded in Georgia’s racial history as I digitized GPB’s daily news was a new experience for me. I had moments of weeping at work as I listened to news reports about the Georgia General Assembly holding expensive special sessions in order to redistrict purely based on race, schoolchildren being prevented from going the schools they want as a result of segregation, and segregation’s long-term effects on Georgia school districts, which I still hear about today. Although I knew about these issues in the abstract, hearing them firsthand was very emotional for me and adding visuals might have been overwhelming.

I would be lying if I were to say I came away from this project without any further attachment to Georgia.  Although it has exposed me to some of the ugly parts I try to avoid in my daily life, it has also exposed me to so much more.  Even the drive to work showed me the oldest drive-in movie theater in the area that is still working.   I also got the opportunity to listen to all of the preparation and execution of the 1996 Olympics.  I am a huge fan of all things Olympics, so

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Indeed, this was the “WORST Gazette ever” (Image: close-up of a DAT labelled “Maxell DAT; Gazette 01-20 95; WORST Gazette ever”)

this was a special treat for me. The Georgia Gazette has given me a sort of pseudo-pride of Georgia; every guest and topic on the show had a relation to Georgia.  Learning about popular historical figures like Blind Tom Wiggins or popular events like the National Grits Festival in Warwick gives me a great appreciation for where I live and the opportunities available to me here.  It has also given me a deeper and fuller appreciation for public broadcasting, something that had already been instilled in me.  In a time where everyone is flocking to Georgia for jobs, often displacing long-term Georgians, I remind myself that my brief time being here must be purposeful.  I hope to help make their history more accessible so that they can feel that true sense of pride they deserve.  With the Georgia Gazette, I hope I did just that–even if it was just a little bit.

 

Written by Riley Griffin, PBPF Summer 2018 Cohort

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About PBPF

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, supports ten graduate student fellows at University of North Carolina, San Jose State University, Clayton State University, University of Missouri, and University of Oklahoma in digitizing at-risk materials at public media organizations around the country. Host sites include the Center for Asian American Media, Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, and KOPN Community Radio. Contents digitized by the fellows will be preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The grant also supports participating universities in developing long-term programs around audiovisual preservation and ongoing partnerships with their local public media stations.

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work.

Join the American Archive of Public Broadcasting for a Road Trip through the Archive!

Archives Road Trip | Public Broadcasting | New Special Collection

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Starting July 5th, the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is taking a virtual road trip through the archive! Time nor space defines this trip, just an all-access pass to content that tells the story of America’s nostalgia and national identity through raw interviews, newscasts, local documentaries, and lectures among other treasures!

Access the AAPB Road Trip Special Collection here! http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/aapb-road-trip.

Selected clips from AAPB’s participating organizations will be shared through AAPB’s social media outlets (@amarchivepub), and you can view the programs in-full within the AAPB Road Trip Special Collection. The collection will be updated with new clips as the summer progresses. The segmented clips and their full programs can be found using the AAPB Road Trip interactive map.

Join us as the #AAPBRoadTrip moves from the east to west coast, and back again, visiting local festivals, monuments, lecture halls, national parks, museums, and poetry readings, among other discoveries! The trip will go through September.

The AAPB is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH Education Foundation to preserve and make accessible significant, historical public broadcasting from across the nation. Collections include local broadcasts from over 100 stations, 2.5 billion inventory records, and 32,000 programs available online for the American public.

Stop #26: Lewiston, ME – Maple Syrup Making

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Maine Public Broadcasting Network. See full program here.

Stop #25:  Clarksville, IN – The Real Rosie the Riveter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from WFYI. See the full program here.

Stop #24: Chicago, IL – Interview about Frank Lloyd Wright with Ada Louise Huxtable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from WILL Public Radio. See the full program here.

Stop #23: Berlin, WI – Wisconsin Public Television

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Wisconsin Public Televison. See the full program here.

Stop #22: Duluth, MN – Africans in Minnesota

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Twin Cities Public Television. See the full program here.

Stop #21: Des Moines, IA – Camp Sunnyside

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Iowa Public Television. See the full program here.

Stop #20: Bismarck, ND – Science for the Public: Jurassic Genome

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from WGBH. See the full program here.

Stop #19: Yellowstone National Park – The Yellowstone Tourist: Evolution in the Pleasuring Ground

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Wyoming PBS. See the full program here.

Stop #18: Seattle, WA – Where Were You in 62: 25th Anniversary of the Seattle Worlds Fair, Part 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from KCTS 9. See the full interview here.

Stop #17: Bethel, AK – Yupik Dance & Culture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from KYUK’s series Yupik Dance & Culture. See the full interview here.

Stop #16: South Kona, HI – Song of South Knoa 1986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from PBS Hawai’i’s series Spectrum Hawai’i. See the full interview here.

Stop #15: Los Angeles, CA – Maya Angelou and Ray Bradbury in the Magic Castle, 1975

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Thirteen WNET’s series Assignment America. See the full interview here.

Stop #14: Las Vegas, Nevada – Millennial Moments: Start of Las Vegas, 1999

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Vegas PBS’ series Millennial Moments. See the full interview here.

Stop #13: Gallup, NM – Navajo Code Talkers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Koahnic Broadcast Corporation’s series National Native News Special Features Assignment America. See the full interview here.

Stop #12: Corpus Christi, TX – Sissy Farenthold: A Texas Maverick

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This clip is from Thirteen WNET’s program Assignment America. See the full interview here.

Stop #11: New Orleans, LA – Louisiana Legends interviews Leah Chase

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Louisiana Public Broadcasting’s program Louisiana Legends. See the full interview here.

Stop #10: Nashville, TN – Jubilee Singers Interview with American Experience featuring Musicologist Horace Clarence Boyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from the WGBH’s American Experience program the Jubilee Singers. See the full interview here.

Stop #9: Montgomery, AL – Eyes on the Prize Interview with Rosa Parks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from the Film and Media Archive at Washington University. See the full interview here.

Stop #8: Tampa, FL – Neat Stuff: Florida’s Collectors with Oregon Public Broadcasting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Oregon Public Broadcasting. See the full program here.

Stop #7: Georgia Gazette visits the birthplace of the U.S. Girl Scouts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Georgia Public Broadcasting. See the full program here.

Stop #6: North Carolina Museums with North Carolina Now

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from North Carolina Now. See the full program here.

Stop #5: Whitesburg, KY – Appalachian Artists: The Younger Generation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Appalshop, Inc. See the full program here.

Stop #4: Maryland, PA – Nasa-Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Maryland Public Television. See the full program here.

Stop #3: Lancaster, PA – The American town: A self-portrait; Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, part 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from The University of Maryland Archives. See the full program here.

Stop #2: New York, NY – In the Heights Broadway Musical with Thirteen WNET

 

This clip is from a Thirteen WNET program. See the full program here.

Stop #1: Boston, MA – Disco Dancing with WGBH

This clip is from a WGBH program. See the full program here.

Announcing the Second Round of Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellows!

WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting is pleased to introduce our second cohort of fellows for the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), a project funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

The PBPF supports students enrolled in non-specialized graduate programs to pursue digital preservation projects at public broadcasting organizations around the country. The Fellowship is designed to provide graduate students with the opportunity to gain hands-on experiences in the practices of audiovisual preservation; address the need for digitization of at-risk public media materials in underserved areas; and increase audiovisual preservation education capacity in Library and Information Science graduate programs around the country.

Over the summer semester of this year, each fellow will inventory, digitize, and catalog a small collection of audiovisual media; generate technical and preservation metadata; and process the digital files for ingest into the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The fellows will collaborate with a faculty advisor at their university to complete a handbook which was drafted by the first Fellows, and develop a training workshop for fellow students in the autumn semester. The fellowship will also support a digitization station at each university for the use by the fellows and future students enrolled at the universities.

Please welcome the members of our Summer 2018 PBPF cohort:

Fellow: Laura Haygood
Program: University of Oklahoma
Host Organization: Oklahoma Educational Television Authority
Host Mentor: Janette Thornbrue, Vice President of Operations, Oklahoma Educational Television Authority
Faculty Advisor:Susan Burke, Interim Director and Associate Professor, School of Library and Information Studies
Local Mentor: Lisa Henry, Curator/Archivist, Political Communication Center, Julian P. Kantor Political Commercial Archive

Laura Haygood is a graduate student in the University of Oklahoma’s Master of Library and Information Studies Program. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in History, and she has a background in instrumental music. She works as a Graduate Research Assistant in the Government Documents collection at OU’s Bizzell Library. Laura has volunteered her time at the Moore-Lindsay Historical House Museum, where she wrote an NEH Preservation Grant, as well as at her local public library and local school library. She will complete her MLIS in May 2019. Laura hopes to use this experience digitizing and preserving audiovisual materials to preserve oral histories in the future. Upon completion of her degree, she plans to seek employment in an archive or academic library. Wherever she ends up, Laura’s overarching professional goal is to connect people with the resources they need.

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Fellow: Riley Eren Cox
Program: Clayton State University
Host Organization: Georgia Public Broadcasting
Host Mentor: Ellen Reinhardt, Radio Program Director, Georgia Public Broadcasting
Faculty Advisor: Josh Kitchens, Director, Master of Archival Studies Program
Local Mentor: Kathy Christensen, former VP of News, Archives and Research at CNN

Riley graduated from SUNY Fredonia in May 2017 with xir bachelor’s in History, minors in Anthropology and Museum Studies.  After interning at the Chautauqua Institution for a season in 2015, xe decided to pursue a career in archives.  Riley is currently enrolled in Clayton State University’s Master of Archival Studies program.  Xe will be ending xir time of employment at the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archive, and Rare Book Library at Emory University this summer and is excited to see where this fellowship takes xir.

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Fellow: Steve Wilcer
Program: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Host Organization: WUNC
Host Mentor: Keith Weston, Web Producer and Back Porch Music Host, WUNC
Faculty Advisor: Helen Tibbo, Alumni Distinguished Professor, SILS
Local Mentor: Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director/AV Conservator, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Steve Wilcer is a graduate student in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a current focus in academic libraries and archives. He obtained his undergraduate degree in Music Performance and Composition at Western Illinois University in Macomb, Illinois and his first master’s degree in Musicology from the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. His multifaceted background in music, research, and archival resources led him to explore and pursue library science and preservation, especially regarding audiovisual materials. In addition to music, he is also interested in history, literature, film, and electronic gaming.

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Fellow: Tanya Yule
Program: San Jose State University
Host Organization: Center for Asian American Media in collaboration with the Bay Area Video Coalition
Host Mentor: James Ott, Director of Finance and Administration, Center for Asian-American Media
Faculty Advisor: Alyce Scott, Lecturer, School of Information
Local Mentor: Jackie Jay, Preservation Technician, Bay Area Video Coalition

Tanya Yule is a current MLIS candidate at San José State University, focusing on archives and photography preservation; she received her BFA in photography from the San Francisco Art Institute, with a background in traditional darkroom methods, and photomechanical printing. Tanya is an intern at the Hoover Institution Archives at Stanford University, and resides in San Francisco with her husband and adorable dog Otto.

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Fellow: Eric Saxon
Program: University of Missouri
Host Organization: KOPN Community Radio
Host Mentor: Jacqueline Casteel, KOPN Community Radio
Faculty Advisor: Sarah Buchanan, Assistant Professor, Library and Information Science
Local Mentor: James Hone, Digital Archivist, University Libraries, Washington University in St. Louis

Eric Saxon is a graduate student in the School of Information Science and Learning Technologies at the University of Missouri – Columbia, where he is specializing in archives. His archival research/building interests include anything in danger of being forgotten by the collective memory, a predilection that has led to digital preservation efforts focusing on community centers, an outsider artist, and a WWII Monuments Man.  Eric holds a master’s degree in art history and graduate certificate in digital humanities from the University of Nebraska, and a bachelor’s degree in American studies from Stanford University.

Follow along on their digitization journeys by searching #aapbpf!

Five New Special Collections Now Available in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting!

Happy International Archives Day! The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is celebrating by launching five NEW Special Collections that feature raw interviews from American Experience’s Freedom Riders, The Murder of Emmett Till, John Brown’s Holy War, and Jubilee Singers, as well as WGBH’s Peabody award-winning documentary Africans in America!

Now available online, you can access these collections at http://americanarchive.org/special_collections or in person at the Library of Congress and at WGBH, preserved for future generations to learn about our nation’s history.

The AAPB, a collaboration between the Library of Congress and Boston public media station WGBH, has digitized and preserved more than 50,000 hours of broadcasts and previously inaccessible programs from public media’s more than 70-year legacy.

The AAPB invites you to spend the day (and everyday) exploring the collections at americanarchive.org. Let us know what you discover by tagging us at @amarchivepub!

New Special Collections Summaries

Freedom Ridershttp://americanarchive.org/special_collections/freedom-riders-interviews

Screen Shot 2018-06-08 at 4.11.39 PMThe Freedom Riders Interview Collection contains 124 raw interviews from the American Experience documentary of the same name. The film documents the six-month period from May to November 1961, when white and black activists rode together on buses across the American South to protest the continued segregation of public buses and transportation facilities. Risking attack from white mobs and arrest by local police, the documentary chronicles the reality of the Freedom Riders’ experiences and success at calling attention to southern indifference to federal law and demanding enforcement of integrated interstate bus travel. The Freedom Riders interviews were conducted with activists and journalists who took part in the Freedom Rides, including John Lewis, a key player in the Civil Rights Movement and a member of the House of Representatives; Diane Nash, a coordinator for Freedom Riders in Nashville; Moses Newson, a journalist who covered the first Freedom Ride; John Seigenthaler, a Special Assistant to Robert F. Kennedy; and Genevieve Hughes Houghton, Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) field secretary on their Freedom Ride. Subjects discussed include the Supreme Court, the American South, Jim Crow, the Ku Klux Klan, violence, racism, segregation, CORE, and the Civil Rights Movement.

The Murder of Emmett Till – http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/the-murder-of-emmett-till-interviews

Screen Shot 2018-06-08 at 4.11.29 PMThe Murder of Emmett Till Interviews Collection is made up of 40 raw interviews from the award-winning 2003 American Experience documentary, The Murder of Emmett Till. The film, which chronicles the story of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old who was murdered in 1955 after being accused of whistling at a white woman, follows Till’s life and transformation into an icon of the Civil Rights Movement. The Murder of Emmett Till interviews paint a picture of the Jim Crow South, the Mississippi community in which the murder took place, and contain intimate recollections by those who knew Emmett Till. Guests include family and friends of Emmett Till, including Mamie Till Mobley, Emmett Till’s mother and Civil Rights activist; and Wheeler Parker, Emmett Till’s cousin; as well as journalists, politicians, and witnesses, like Ernest Withers, a photographer known for his photos of the segregated South; Willie Reed, a witness who testified against Emmett Till’s murderers; and David Jordan, a Senator from Mississippi. Topics include segregation, Jim Crow, lynching and violence, the American judicial system, journalism, the American South, and the Civil Rights Movement.

John Brown’s Holy Warhttp://americanarchive.org/special_collections/john-brown-holy-war-interviews

Screen Shot 2018-06-08 at 4.11.15 PMThe John Brown’s Holy War Interview Collection is comprised of 41 raw interviews conducted in 2000 for the American Experience film of the same name. The interviews examined the enigmatic life, history, myth, and legacy of abolitionist John Brown, one of the most controversial figures in American history. John Brown’s Holy War outlines John Brown’s life, role in the abolition movement, unsuccessful raid on the Harpers Ferry federal armory, death, and subsequent entry into American lore as both villain and martyr during the American Civil War. Interviews were conducted with historians, authors, and educators, including James Horton, Professor of American Studies and History at George Washington University; Paul Finkelman, historian of American law; Margaret Washington, historian and Professor of History at Cornell University; and Russell Banks, novelist. Interviews feature a range of topics, including abolition, philosophy, enslavement, race, Christianity, economics, mental health, journalism, the Dred Scott Decision, Frederick Douglass, Pre-Civil War American politics, the Harpers Ferry attack, and the American Civil War.

Jubilee Singers Interviewshttp://americanarchive.org/special_collections/jubilee-singers-interviews

Screen Shot 2018-06-08 at 4.11.24 PMThe Jubilee Singers Interviews Collection includes 19 raw interviews conducted in 2000 for the American Experience documentary Jubilee Singers: Sacrifice and Glory. The film focused on the early years of the Fisk Jubilee Singers, an ensemble of students from Fisk University in Tennessee who created the a cappella group in 1871 in an effort to raise funds for the financially-struggling school. The original Fisk Jubilee Singers, largely made up of former slaves, toured around the United States, and, later, Europe, and were known for their performances of spirituals, which they are partially credited with preserving and introducing to a wider audience. Interviews were conducted with musicologists and historians, including John Hope Franklin, historian and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom; Toni Anderson, Music Historian; Horace Clarence Boyer, musicologist and noted scholar of African-American gospel music; and Reavis L. Mitchell, Professor of History at Fisk University. Topics include spirituals and music, slavery, racism, religion, segregation, the American Civil War, and higher education, particularly historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), and Fisk University.

Africans in Americahttp://americanarchive.org/special_collections/africans-in-america-interviews

Screen Shot 2018-06-08 at 4.11.35 PMThe Africans in America Interviews Collection is made up of 53 raw interviews from the award-winning, four-part documentary of the same name, which aired on PBS in 1998. The documentary, the first to fully examine the history of slavery in the United States, focused on the experiences of African people and their transformation of America, beginning with 16th-century enslavement on Africa’s Gold Coast and ending on the eve of the American Civil War in 1861. The interviews offer an in-depth examination of the social, economic, and intellectual foundations of slavery and the ways in which African people changed the United States. Guests include descendants of slaves and slave-owners, authors, professors, historians, and statesmen, including Colin Powell, retired four-star general and the first African American on the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Karen Hughes White, a descendant of Thomas Jefferson and founder of the Afro-American Historical Association of Fauquier County; Catherine Acholonu, a Nigerian author and Associate Professor of English Literature, Awuku College of Education; and Jeffrey Leath, Pastor of Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church, Philadelphia. Topics covered include Christianity and English Protestantism, George Washington, Toussaint Louverture, the American Revolution, Nat Turner’s Rebellion, gender conventions, racism, violence, economics, family, and enslavement.

Special thanks to Lynn Mason of the WGBH Media Library and Archives’ Stock Sales and Licensing team for her work in digitizing the collections and Miranda Villesvik for ingesting the collections into AAPB.

Tanya Yule, Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellow at CAAM

 

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Drives loaded up and ready to be sent to the AAPB!!

 

Hello, my name is Tanya Yule and I am one of the five, in the first cohort of the AAPB Public Broadcast Preservation Fellows. Later this month I will be receiving my Masters in Library and Information Science, and an advanced certificate in Digital Assets Management from San Josè State University, with an emphasis in archives and preservation.

When I began the program at SJSU it was with a focus on photography preservation; this was initially a means of utilizing my background in historic photography practices as a way to protect and preserve images for future generations. However, through my work at the Hoover Institution Archives (where I am an intern), I began to fall in love with working in all areas of archives, not just with photographs, and have had the fortunate experience to process incredible collections that range from the Russian Revolution to the Vietnam War, each providing a unique glimpse of someone’s life that I get to describe, organize, and preserve for future generations. When the fellowship was posted, I had a “this was made for me” moment and applied instantly. I have wanted to work with A/V media for quite sometime, and have yet to have the opportunity, until now.

For the last three-months I have been entrenched in material spanning the globe; each item as unique as the next, and giving me more in return than I was prepared for. As I am sitting here trying to tap out a structure and synthesis of what the heck just occurred during the American Archive of Public Broadcasting’s Preservation Fellowship, I am almost overwhelmed with the task.

 

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Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC) Set-up

 

The specialness of this particular fellowship has been based in the opportunity to work with at-risk magnetic media, multiple stakeholders, and learn a very complex technique for capturing. I was fortunate to be able to work with two amazing San Francisco based non-profit organizations that focus on representing arts and culture for underrepresented communities, and have been pillars in what they do for several decades. The collection I worked from came from the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM); CAAM isn’t a traditional archives, but their holdings are significant and represent a wide range of diverse films and documentaries; many which have appeared on local and national PBS stations over the years. The collection contained U-matic, Betacam, and Digibeta tapes, many which haven’t been viewed in decades. The majority of the fellowship was spent over at the Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC), under the watchful (and extremely patient and knowledgeable) eye of Jackie Jay. I was fortunate to be able to have my experience take place with the help of a staff that do this work daily, and could help me capture and learn in the best possible situation. I would like to also give a shout out to Morgan Morel for suffering though my lack of commandline knowledge, he has inspired me to take a python class when this is all over.

What is in a name?

While inventorying the items for the collection at CAAM, I couldn’t help but be curious about some of the titles: Anatomy of a Springroll, Dollar a Day, 10 Cents a Dance, A Village Called Versailles, Sewing Woman, to name a few. Since all of the items are on some form of video (magnetic media) it isn’t as easy as just popping in a deck and taking a peek. While capturing in the dark room with my noise cancelling headphones on, there were moments that I would literally laugh out loud, or cry; the subjects are heavy, as is the perspective and history, my work at the Hoover Archives had helped prepare me for dealing with difficult collections, especially when it comes to visual materials regarding war and atrocities.

 

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Many videos have some form of image error, the above “watermark” is a blemish on an old tape, this can be seen in 1/30 of a second. After capturing I would go back to any discrepancy to investigate further

 

Cleaning, cleaning, and some baking!

I soon learned that the majority of my time was in making sure that the decks and tapes were in tip-top shape before capturing. It is quite amazing how much time is spent cleaning tapes, cleaning the decks, baking tapes (in a really high tech food dehydrator), re-cleaning tapes, and re-cleaning machines, as well as setting up levels and making sure that the item being digitized is as close to the original as possible. The cleaning ensures that there is no transfer of dust or debris from another tape, and that the output from the deck is precise. I am extremely fortunate to have my digitization station at BAVC, as they understand the fundamentals of video preservation and digitization, and helped me learn more about the process then I thought I would be capable of in such a short time.

About the collection

As archivists often times we really don’t know what the collection is “about” until the end, there are usually surprises, and most the times these records don’t come with a “read me” file, so I figured I would save this portion to the end as well. The collection as a whole speaks to the diversity of Asian American life, culture, and experiences; evoking the universal struggle of the human condition. When curating the featured films for the AAPB Special Collections page it was difficult to choose, however, many of the films tell the history of women who have defied odds, been outspoken, or who had sacrificed so much for so little in return, I wanted to put these women upfront and recognize their stories and the ones who decided to tell them.

 

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CAAM Video Archive

 

Having this wonderful opportunity to participate in this fellowship while completing my degree allowed me to expand my technical and historical knowledge base, which I am forever grateful for. I would like to thank SJSU and my wonderful advisor Alyce Scott, James Ott and Davin Agatep at the CAAM for helping me out with the project, the entire preservation crew at BAVC for making sure I didn’t break anything, and of course the AAPB and all of the wonderful WGBH folks that made this fellowship happen.

If you are interested in learning more, here is a Q & A I did with CAAM when I started, you can also follow #aapbpf for photos of the stations and process.

 

 

Written by Tanya Yule, PBPF Spring 2018 Cohort

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About PBPF

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, supports ten graduate student fellows at University of North Carolina, San Jose State University, Clayton State University, University of Missouri, and University of Oklahoma in digitizing at-risk materials at public media organizations around the country. Host sites include the Center for Asian American Media, Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, and KOPN Community Radio. Contents digitized by the fellows will be preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The grant also supports participating universities in developing long-term programs around audiovisual preservation and ongoing partnerships with their local public media stations.

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work.