American Archive of Public Broadcasting Releases Exclusive Collections

The Library of Congress and WGBH have acquired and preserved original, full-length interviews from The Civil War, Eyes on the Prize and American Masters
  
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) recently acquired three collections of original, full-length interviews from groundbreaking public television documentaries: Ken Burns’ The Civil War, Eyes on the Prize and American Masters. Only excerpts of these interviews were included in previously released, edited programs. Now, the full-length interviews from these landmark series will be available to view online at americanarchive.org or in person at the Library of Congress and at WGBH, preserved for future generations to learn about our nation’s history.
 
The AAPB, a collaboration between the Library of Congress and Boston public media station WGBH, has digitized and preserved more than 50,000 hours of broadcasts and previously inaccessible programs from public radio and public television’s more than 60-year legacy.
 
Interviews from Ken Burns’ The Civil War
 
The Civil War, an epic nine-episode series by the award-winning documentary filmmaker Ken Burns and produced in conjunction with WETA, Washington, DC and American Documentaries, Inc., first aired in September 1990 to an audience of 40 million viewers. The film is the recipient of 40 major film and television awards, including two Emmys and two Grammys.
 
The AAPB The Civil War collection includes eight digitized, full-length interviews with distinguished historians and commentators Barbara J. Fields, C. Vann Woodward, Robert Penn Warren, William Safire, James Symington, Stephen B. Oates, Ed Bearss and Daisy Turner. The Civil War collection is available online athttp://americanarchive.org/special_collections/ken-burns-civil-war.
 
Interviews from Eyes on the Prize
 
Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years 1954–1965 tells the definitive story of the civil rights era from the point of view of the ordinary men and women whose extraordinary actions launched a movement that changed the fabric of American life, and embodied a struggle whose reverberations continue to be felt today. The award-winning documentary series recounts the fight to end decades of discrimination and segregation from the murder of Emmett Till and the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955 and 1956 to the 1965 Voting Rights Campaign in Selma, Alabama. Eyes on the Prize was produced by Blackside, Inc and aired on PBS in 1987.
 
The Eyes on the Prize interviews collection comes from Washington University Libraries’ Henry Hampton Collection and includes 75 hours of full-length interviews with leaders and activists such as Rosa Parks, Constance Baker Motley, James Farmer, Robert Moses, Andrew Young, John Lewis, Ralph Abernathy, Stokely Carmichael and Myrlie Evers. The Eyes on the Prize collection is available online at http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/eotp-i-interviews.
 
Interviews from American Masters
 
American Masters is an award-winning biography series that celebrates American arts and culture. Launched in 1986 on PBS, the series set the standard for documentary film profiles, and is produced by New York’s flagship PBS station THIRTEEN for WNET.
 
AAPB has preserved more than 800 full-length interviews filmed for American Masters with cultural luminaries such as David Bowie, Yoko Ono, Robert Plant, Tim Burton, Nora Ephron, Denzel Washington, Carol Burnett, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Quincy Jones and Jimmy Carter. The interviews, digitized for In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive and the American Masters Podcast, will be archived for long-term storage at the Library of Congress to ensure their survival for future generations. Researchers can access the full collection on location at the Library of Congress and at WGBH. Information about the American Masters collection is available at http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/american-masters-interviews.
 
The AAPB is a national effort to preserve at-risk public media and provide a central web portal for access to the programming that public stations and producers have created over the past 60 years. In its initial phase, the AAPB digitized approximately 40,000 hours of radio and television programming and related materials selected by more than 100 public media stations and organizations across the country. The entire collection is available for research on location at the Library of Congress and WGBH, and currently more than 20,000 programs are available in the AAPB’s Online Reading Room at americanarchive.org to anyone in the United States.
 
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About WGBH
WGBH Boston is America’s preeminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the Web, including Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Frontline, Nova, American Experience, Arthur and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle, and children’s series. WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia™, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, or visually impaired. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards…even two Oscars. Find more information at www.wgbh.org.
 
About the Library of Congress
The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States – and extensive materials from around the world – both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship atcopyright.gov.
 
About the American Archive of Public Broadcasting
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 60 years. To date, over 40,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at the Library of Congress and WGBH, and more than 20,000 programs are available online atamericanarchive.org.

AAPB NDSR Resources Roundup

In 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services awarded a generous grant to WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) to develop the AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR). Through the grant, we placed residents at public media organizations around the country to complete digital stewardship projects.

After a fantastic final presentation at the Society of American Archivists meeting in Portland last month, the 2016-2017 AAPB NDSR residencies have now officially drawn to a close. We wanted to share with you a complete list of the resources generated throughout the residencies, including instructional webinars, blog posts, and resources created for stations over the course of the NDSR projects.

Resources

Audiorecorder (Open-Source Audio Digitization Tool)

CUNY TV Mediamicroservices Documentation

KBOO 2-Page Recommendation Summary

KBOO Digital Preservation Policy

KBOO Current Digital Storage and Archiving Practices

KBOO Diagram for Current Digital Program Production Practices

PBCore-Based Data Model for KBOO Analog Audio Assets

Workflow for Open-Reel Preservation at KBOO

KBOO Digital Audio Guidelines and Procedures

Recommended Next Steps for Developing an Integrated Searchable Database of Born-Digital and Analog Audio at KBOO

Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan

WHUT Naming Conventions for Local Programming

Wisconsin Public Television Microsoft Access Database to PBCore Crosswalk

Wisconsin Public Television AMS Workflows Documentation

Wisconsin Public Television Digitization Workflows Chart

Wisconsin Public Television Proposal for New Metadata Database

Resident Webinars

Challenges of Removable Media in Digital Preservation,” by Eddy Colloton (slides)

Demystifying FFmpeg/FFprobe,” by Andrew Weaver (slides)

Intro to Data Manipulation with Python CSV,” by Adam Lott (slides)

Through the Trapdoor: Metadata and Disambiguation in Fanfiction,” by Kate McManus (slides)

ResourceSpace for Audiovisual Archiving,” by Selena Chau (slides) (Demo videos: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Whats, Whys, and How Tos of Web Archiving,” by Lorena Ramírez-López (slides) (transcript)

Other Webinars

“Metadata: Storage, Modeling and Quality,” by Kara Van Malssen, Partner & Senior Consultant at AVPreserve (slides only)

Public Media Production Workflows,” by Leah Weisse, WGBH Digital Archive Manager/Production Archival Compliance Manager (slides)

Imposter Syndrome” by Jen LaBarbera, Head Archivist at Lambda Archives of San Diego, and Dinah Handel, Mass Digitization Coordinator at the NYPL (slides)

Preservation and Access: Digital Audio,” by Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director and AV Conservator at the Southern Folklife Collection (slides)

Troubleshooting Digital Preservation,” by Shira Peltzman, Digital Archivist at UCLA Library (slides)

Studs Terkel Radio Archive: Tips and Tricks for Sharing Great Audio,” by Grace Radkins, Digital Content Librarian at Studs Terkel Radio Library (slides)

From Theory to Action: Digital Preservation Tools and Strategies,” by Danielle Spalenka, Project Director of the Digital POWRR Project (slides)

Resident Blog Posts

Digital Stewardship at KBOO Community Radio,” Selena Chau (8/9/16)

Metadata Practices at Minnesota Public Radio,” Kate McManus (8/15/16)

NDSA, data wrangling, and KBOO treasures,” Selena Chau (8/30/16)

Minnesota Books and Authors,” Kate McManus (9/23/16)

Snapshot from the IASA Conference: Thoughts on the 2nd Day,” Eddy Colloton (9/29/16)

Who just md5deep-ed and redirected all them checksums to a .csv file? This gal,” Lorena Ramírez-López (10/6/16)

IASA Day 1 and Voice to Text Recognition,” Selena Chau (10/11/16)

IASA – Remixed,” Kate McManus (10/12/16)

Learning GitHub (or, if I can do it, you can too!)” Andrew Weaver (10/13/16)
Home Movie Day,” Eddy Colloton (10/15/16)

Snakes in the Archive,” Adam Lott (10/20/16)

Vietnam, Oral Histories, and the WYSO Archives Digital Humanities Symposium,” Tressa Graves (11/7/16)

Archives in Conversation (A Glimpse into the Minnesota Archives Symposium, 2016),” Kate McManus (11/15/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 1: SpaceSaver,” Lorena Ramírez-López (11/21/16)

Is there something that does it all?: Choosing a metadata management system,” Selena Chau (11/22/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 2: lots of manual labor,” Lorena Ramírez-López (12/20/16)

Just Ask For Help Already!” Eddy Colloton (12/22/16)

Playing with Pandas: CSV metadata transformations,” Selena Chau (1/4/17)

MPR50,” Kate McManus (2/8/17)

Before & after XML to PBCore in ResourceSpace,” Selena Chau (2/9/17)

Advocating for Archives in a Production Environment,” Eddy Colloton (2/27/17)

Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan,” Eddy Colloton (3/6/17)

Moving Beyond the Allegory of the Lone Digital Archivist (& my day of Windows scripting at KBOO,” Selena Chau (3/16/17)

Save the Data!” Kate McManus (3/16/17)

Professional Development Time Project: Audiorecorder,” Andrew Weaver (3/27/17)

Library Technology Conference,” Kate McManus (3/29/17)

Reporting from PNW: Online Northwest Conference,” Selena Chau (4/13/17)

Adventures in Perceptual Hashing,” Andrew Weaver (4/20/17)

Trying New Things: Meditations on NDSR from the Symposium in DC,” Kate McManus (5/3/17)

Filmed Immersion Week Sessions

Why Archive Public Media

The History of Public Media and the AAPB

Mastering Project Management

Growing Your Professional Profile

Negotiating at Work

Think Like a Computer

Get To Know Your Audiovisual Media 

Many of these resources can also be found on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting Wiki, created by the residents for their collaborative final project.

AAPB NDSR Resources Round-up

 

In 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services awarded a generous grant to WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) to develop the AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR). Through this project, we have placed seven graduates of master’s degree programs in digital stewardship residencies at public media organizations around the country.

AAPB NDSR  has already yielded dozens of great resources for the public media and audiovisual preservation community – and the residents aren’t even halfway done yet! As we near the program’s midpoint, we wanted to catch you up on the program so far.

We started off in July 2016 with Immersion Week in Boston, which featured presentations on the history of public media and the AAPB, an overview of physical and digital audiovisual materials, an introduction to audiovisual metadata, and instructional seminars on digital preservation workflows, project management, and professional development. Attendees also participated in a full-day session on “Thinking Like a Computer” and a hands-on command line workshop.

Several sessions from Immersion Week were filmed by
WGBH Forum Network, including:

In August 2016, the residents dispersed to their host stations, and began recording their experiences in a series of thoughtful blog posts, covering topics from home movies to DAM systems to writing in Python.

AAPB NDSR blog posts to date include:

Digital Stewardship at KBOO Community Radio,” Selena Chau (8/9/16)

Metadata Practices at Minnesota Public Radio,” Kate McManus (8/15/16)

NDSA, data wrangling, and KBOO treasures,” Selena Chau (8/30/16)

Minnesota Books and Authors,” Kate McManus (9/23/16)

Snapshot from the IASA Conference: Thoughts on the 2nd Day,” Eddy Colloton (9/29/16)

Who just md5deep-ed and redirected all them checksums to a .csv file? This gal,” Lorena Ramirez-Lopez (10/6/16)

IASA Day 1 and Voice to Text Recognition,” Selena Chau (10/11/16)

IASA – Remixed,” Kate McManus (10/12/16)

Learning GitHub (or, if I can do it, you can too!)” Andrew Weaver (10/13/16)
Home Movie Day,” Eddy Colloton (10/15/16)

Snakes in the Archive,” Adam Lott (10/20/16)

Vietnam, Oral Histories, and the WYSO Archives Digital Humanities Symposium,” Tressa Graves (11/7/16)

Archives in Conversation (A Glimpse into the Minnesota Archives Symposium, 2016),” Kate McManus (11/15/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 1: SpaceSaver,” Lorena Ramirez-Lopez (11/21/16)

Is there something that does it all?: Choosing a metadata management system,” Selena Chau (11/22/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 2: lots of manual labor,” Lorena Ramirez-Lopez (12/20/16)

Just Ask For Help Already!” Eddy Colloton (12/22/16)

August also kicked off our first series of guest webinars, focusing on a range of topics of interest to audiovisual and digital preservation professionals. Most webinars were recorded, and all have slides available.

AAPB NDSR webinars to date include:

Metadata: Storage, Modeling and Quality,” by Kara Van Malssen, Partner & Senior Consultant at AVPreserve

Public Media Production Workflows,” by Leah Weisse, WGBH Digital Archive Manager/Production Archival Compliance Manager (slides)

Imposter Syndrome” by Jen LaBarbera, Head Archivist at Lambda Archives of San Diego, and Dinah Handel, Mass Digitization Coordinator at the NYPL (slides)

Preservation and Access: Digital Audio,” by Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director and AV Conservator at the Southern Folklife Collection (slides)

Troubleshooting Digital Preservation,” by Shira Peltzman, Digital Archivist at UCLA Library (slides)

Studs Terkel Radio Archive: Tips and Tricks for Sharing Great Audio,” by Grace Radkins, Digital Content Librarian at Studs Terkel Radio Library (slides)

From Theory to Action: Digital Preservation Tools and Strategies,” by Danielle Spalenka, Project Director of the Digital POWRR Project (slides)

Our first two resident-hosted webinars (open to the public) will be happening this month! Registration and more info is available here.

The residents also hosted two great panel presentations, first in September at the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives Conference, and in November at the Association of Moving Image Archivists Conference. The AMIA session in particular generated a lot of Twitter chatter; you can see a roundup here.

To keep up with AAPB NDSR blog posts, webinar recordings, and project updates as they happen, follow the AAPB NDSR site at ndsr.americanarchive.org.

Kicking off the AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residency

The 2016-2017 AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residencies residencies have now officially kicked off, starting with our AAPB NDSR Immersion Week. From July 25-29, hosts, residents and mentors gathered at WGBH to learn, discuss, and review information about digital preservation and archiving audiovisual materials.

Immersion Week presentations covered a wide array of topics, including the history of public media and the AAPB, an overview of physical and digital audiovisual materials, anintroduction to audiovisual metadata, and instructional seminars on digital preservation workflows, project management, and professional development.  Each of our host mentors also delivered a presentation on the history of their station and their goals for the course of the residency.

On the more technical end of digital preservation, attendees participated a full-day session on “Thinking Like a Computer” and a hands-on command line workshop.

Immersion Week also included visits to MIT’s Digital Sustainability Lab and Northeastern University’s video digitization center, as well as a thorough tour of the WGBH archives, production facilities, and the Media Access Group.

All slides from Immersion Week can be found through the NDSR GitHub account, and several full filmed presentations will be available soon through WGBH Forum Network.

Around the edges of the planned instructional programming, residents still had the energy to check out some of Boston’s famous sites, like the JFK Presidential Library, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and Fanueil Hall.

The hosts and residents have now dispersed to begin their public media preservation projects. Visit our NDSR website for updates from the residents as they document their work throughout the residency, and follow along on the #ndsr hashtag on Twitter!

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Meet Charles Hosale, our new American Archive team member

charles_profileHi! I’m Charles Hosale, and I’m very glad
to be joining the AAPB team as a Special Projects Assistant at WGBH. I come from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where I worked as the AV Project Archivist at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I’ve also been a Contract Archivist for MillerCoors and Robert W. Baird & Co. I’m really excited to be able to contribute to AAPB because it is a project I’ve been enthusiastic about since it began!

At WGBH I will be working on a few different projects. On the NET Collection Catalog Project, I will be working to create robust catalog records and doing historical research into titles for which little information exists. For the NewsHour Digitization Project, I will be cataloging titles, processing transcripts, working with our vendors to ensure the quality of digitized episodes, and ingesting the files into our digital holdings. I’ll be handling ingestion and quality control for the American Masters Digital Archive Project too. I’ll also be adding some records besides NewsHour and American Masters to the AAPB.

I developed a passion for public media while growing up watching public programing, including the NewsHour and NOVA. I became an archivist so that I could interact with a different story every day, and could help keep those stories safe for the future. I’m grateful today to be able to work on stories that shaped me into the person I am! Even more than that I’m thrilled to increase access to and promote the records so that they can have continued use. Public media programs remain as vital today as when they were produced! Television is an interesting artistic medium to archive because, like I’ve already seen while working on the NET Project, there are some incredible productions that might have only been broadcast once and then put on the shelves, forgotten without any method of continued access. I hope that our work leads to the rediscovery of some compelling stories.

If you’d like to know a bit more about me, I received both an undergraduate in Comparative Literature and an MLIS with an Archives concentration from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. When I’m not working I like to cook (I worked as a line cook during undergrad!) and listen to music. Because I lived in Milwaukee my whole life I’m looking forward to experiencing the East Coast and exploring Boston!

THIRTEEN’s American Masters Celebrates 30th Anniversary with Launch of Digital Video Archive and Podcast

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), a collaboration between WGBH and the Library of Congress, is delighted to preserve for posterity more than 800 previously unreleased full-length interviews that were originally filmed for the iconic documentary PBS series American Masters, produced by New York public television station THIRTEEN for WNET. The interviews, digitized for In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive and the American Masters Podcast, will be archived for long-term storage at the Library of Congress to ensure their survival for future generations.

For 30 years, American Masters has consistently produced high-quality, award-winning documentaries showcasing the pantheon of artistic and cultural figures in American history. This collection will be an amazing addition to the AAPB.

As a central web portal for researchers to discover historic public media content, the AAPB provides information on more than 2.5 million public television and radio programs stored at stations and archives across the nation. Users searching American Masters interviews in the AAPB catalog at americanarchive.org will be directed to the In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive website to view the material.

Read more about this new American Masters project below:

THIRTEEN’s American Masters Celebrates 30th Anniversary with Launch of Digital Video Archive and Podcast at pbs.org/americanmasters

Features previously unreleased interviews with David Bowie, Gloria Steinem, Herbie Hancock, Bernadette Peters, Mike Nichols and others from the series’ award-winning documentary films

(NEW YORK – June 23, 2016) On this day in 1986, THIRTEEN’s American Masters made its series debut on PBS with Private Conversations: On the Set of “Death of a Salesman, a cinéma vérité documentary about the making of Arthur Miller’s masterpiece for network television, and its stars Dustin Hoffman and John Malkovich.

Today, American Masters celebrates its 30th anniversary with the launch of In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive and the American Masters Podcast, featuring previously unreleased interviews filmed for the documentary series: 2,156 tapes, approximately 1,388 digitized hours, 800-plus interviews and counting.

A selection of short-form videos showcasing interviews with David Bowie, Gloria Steinem, Herbie Hancock, Bernadette Peters, Mike Nichols and other luminaries discussing America’s most enduring artistic and cultural giants are available now on the American Masters website (http://pbs.org/americanmasters). New videos will be released on an ongoing basis as the archive is digitized.

The American Masters Podcast, hosted by series executive producer Michael Kantor, will feature long-form interviews from In Their Own Words. The first season, “Women on Women, presents interviews with influential women discussing women cultural icons. Episode one features Gloria Steinem in conversation with the late, multiple Emmy-winning filmmaker Gail Levin taking a critical look at the life and career of Marilyn Monroe from 2006’s American Masters – Marilyn: Still Life. New episodes will be released biweekly on the American Masters website, iTunes, Soundcloud and Stitcher.

All full-length, digitized interviews will be archived by the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), a collaboration between WGBH and the Library of Congress to preserve and make accessible significant historical content created by public media.

“I’m thrilled that the National Endowment for the Arts has provided major funding to get this project off the ground so we can finally share gems from the cutting room floor with the public,” said Michael Kantor, executive producer of American Masters. “Series creator Susan Lacy built a rich library of more than 200 documentary films, which is a treasure trove of American arts, culture and intellect, and the amazing interviews that informed these films are largely unseen. While we are still seeking funds to create a comprehensive, interactive digital archive website, we are confident that In Their Own Words and the American Masters Podcast will inspire and entertain a broad audience both today and in the future.”

Pending funding, the In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive dedicated website will eventually house all full-length, digitized interviews and be a public research-and-learning tool with an emphasis on usability, discoverability and comprehensive indexing to make American Masters interviews easily accessible and available to all.

To further explore the lives and works of masters past and present, the American Masters website currently offers streaming video of select films, outtakes, filmmaker interviews, photos, educational resources and more. American Masters has earned 28 Emmy Awards — including 10 for Outstanding Non-Fiction Series and five for Outstanding Non-Fiction Special — 12 Peabodys, an Oscar, three Grammys, two Producers Guild Awards and many other honors. The series is a production of THIRTEEN PRODUCTIONS LLC for WNET and also seen on the WORLD channel.

In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive and the American Masters Podcast is produced by Joe Skinner. Michael Kantor is executive producer.

Major funding for In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts. Funding for American Masters is provided by The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Rosalind P. Walter, The Philip and Janice Levin Foundation, Judith and Burton Resnick, The Blanche & Irving Laurie Foundation, Vital Projects Fund, Ellen and James S. Marcus, Lenore Hecht Foundation, Michael & Helen Schaffer Foundation, The André and Elizabeth Kertész Foundation, and public television viewers.

About WNET
WNET is America’s flagship PBS station and parent company of THIRTEEN and WLIW21. WNET also operates NJTV, the statewide public media network in New Jersey. Through its broadcast channels, three cable services (KidsThirteen, Create and World) and online streaming sites, WNET brings quality arts, education and public affairs programming to more than five million viewers each week. WNET produces and presents such acclaimed PBS series as Nature, Great Performances, American Masters, PBS NewsHour Weekend, Charlie Rose and a range of documentaries, children’s programs, and local news and cultural offerings. WNET’s groundbreaking series for children and young adults include Get the Math, Oh Noah! and Cyberchase as well as Mission US, the award-winning interactive history game. WNET highlights the tri-state’s unique culture and diverse communities through NYC-ARTS, Reel 13, NJTV News with Mary Alice Williams and MetroFocus, the daily multi-platform news magazine focusing on the New York region. In addition, WNET produces online-only programming including the award-winning series about gender identity, First Person, and an intergenerational look at tech and pop culture, The Chatterbox with Kevin and Grandma Lill. In 2015, THIRTEEN launched Passport, an online streaming service which allows members to see new and archival THIRTEEN and PBS programming anytime, anywhere: www.thirteen.org/passport.

About the American Archive of Public Broadcasting
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to preserve at-risk public media and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 60 years. To date, over 40,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized. The entire collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and more than 13,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

 

 

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AAPB honored with CLIR DLF Community/Capacity Award!

Today the Council on Library and Information ResourcesDigital Library Federation (DLF) announced that the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) has been selected as an inaugural recipient of the DLF Community/Capacity Award, along with co-recipient The Biodiversity Heritage Library! Voting for the award ran through the month of June, and members selected AAPB among 16 nominees.

About the DLF Community/Capacity Awards:

“Unlike many honors in technology-related fields, DLF Comm/Cap Awards recognize collective action over individual achievement, socially-responsible creativity over pure innovation, and acts of care, maintenance, thoughtful growth, and repair over the tools and practices of disruption. They honor constructive, community-minded capacity-building in digital libraries, archives, and museums: efforts that contribute to our ability to collaborate across institutional lines and work toward larger goals and a better future, together.

Most of all, they’re about inspiration. This year’s 16 inspiring nominees spanned disciplines and fields. They included projects of greatly varied longevity and size, expert teams and community organizers, and people making deeply valued contributions to DLF practitioner communities and the publics and missions driving them.”

AAPB will be honored in an award ceremony at the 2016 DLF Forum, taking place this November in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

More about the award is available here: https://www.diglib.org/archives/12231/

We could not have received this award without the many contributions and support from our content contributors at stations and archives across the United States and territories. Together, we are fulfilling a shared vision, first embodied in the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, to create a national library and archives of significant public television and radio content. Together, we are preserving this content for posterity and ensuring its access for researchers today and well into the future.

Finally, our thanks go to the DLF, CLIR and to the broader DLF community and membership for voting for AAPB as the recipient of the award! We are incredibly honored!

About the AAPB, The Biodiversity Heritage Library, and the Digital Library Federation:

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting 
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting, led by WGBH and the Library of Congress, has coordinated a national effort to preserve and make accessible significant historical content created by public media and are preserving at-risk public broadcasting before its content is lost to posterity. To date, more than 40,000 hours of content contributed by more than 100 organizations across the country have been digitized. The entire collection is accessible on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress. Together, WGBH, the Library, and participating organizations have made more than 13,500 programs available online for research, educational and informational purposes, becoming a focal point for discoverability of historical public media content. Learn more.

The Biodiversity Heritage Library 
An international consortium of over two dozen organizations, the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) stands out not only in service to its partners, but also in its collaborative approach to making open access, often rare and unique biodiversity content available to 120,000+ monthly users worldwide. A signatory of the Bouchout Declaration, BHL’s commitment to open access extends beyond placing scanned pages on its website. Content is available via Internet Archive, Digital Public Library of America, and Europeana; over 100,000 scientific illustrations via Flickr; and BHL’s suite of APIs brings data directly to users. To build capacity among partners, BHL also provides intensive digitization workshops, reaching participants from across Sub-Saharan Africa, Mexico, the U.S., and beyond, and supporting participation by institutions large and small. Learn more.

Digital Library Federation
The Digital Library Federation is a robust and diverse community of practitioners who advance research, learning, and the public good through the creative design and wise application of digital library technologies. DLF serves as a resource and catalyst for collaboration among its institutional members, and all who are invested in the success of libraries, museums, and archives in the digital age. DLF serves its parent organization, the Council on Library and Information Resources, as the place where CLIR’s broader information-community strategies are informed and enriched by digital library practice. DLF connects CLIR’s vision and research agenda with our active practitioner network, and brings the insights of the DLF community to bear. In addition, we partner closely on key CLIR initiatives related to DLF’s mission, in order to provide advice and expertise to CLIR from the digital library community, as well as connections and opportunities for our members. DLF currently includes 151 institutional members. Learn more.

The Past Made Present: The 2016 WYSO Archives Digital Humanities Symposium

This announcement has been cross-posted from WYSO’s Rediscovering Radio Archives blog.

The Past Made Present: The 2016 WYSO Archives Digital Humanities Symposium

The first WYSO Archives Digital Humanities Symposium will convene on October 20-22, 2016, in honor of American Archives Month.

Sponsored by public radio station WYSO-FM in partnership with Antioch College, Central State University, Wittenberg University, and Wright State University, and hosted at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, the symposium will feature speakers, exhibits, a showcase of digital humanities projects, related presentations, and faculty workshops on Digital Humanities and Pedagogy.

Call for proposals:

WYSO-FM and its academic partners invite submission of abstracts for the WYSO Archives Digital Humanities Symposium. This symposium seeks to examine the interdisciplinary nature of digital humanities scholarship as we look back on the Vietnam War period. Panels, roundtables, multi-media presentations, and posters are welcome from all areas of scholarship and from museums, libraries, archives, and other cultural institutions. Scholars at all levels and affiliations are invited to submit proposals. Sessions may be on any topic related to the use of digital humanities, but in recognition of the significant anniversaries associated with the Vietnam era as reflected in the WYSO Archives, proposals utilizing primary sources related to the 1960s and 1970s are strongly encouraged. While the focus is primarily on audio projects, all media are welcome.

Each presentation will be limited to fifteen (15) minutes with Q&A to follow.

Proposal Deadline – June 30, 2016

Topics may include:

  • Reflecting on Sixties Activism through Oral History
  • Vietnam Veterans Remember the War
  • Using Digital Humanities to Teach Recent History
  • Digital Archives and High School Student Research
  • Radio Preservation and the American Archive of Public Broadcasting

Presentation types:

Sessions will be divided into the following categories:

  • Paper/Multimedia Presentation
  • Pecha Kucha (15-20 slides shown for 20 seconds each; 5 – 6:40 minutes)
  • Poster Presentations

We encourage both scholars and students at the secondary, undergraduate and graduate levels to submit abstracts for presentations.

Submission process: 

Submissions are due by June 30, 2016. Email abstracts as an attachment to Archives@wyso.org with the following information:

  • Name
  • Contact information
  • Institutional affiliations, if applicable
  • Session type
  • Session abstract of 250 words
  • Audiovisual needs
  • Biographical information on presenter of 250 words

Notification of acceptance or decline will be made via e-mail. Scholars with accepted proposals are expected to register for the symposium.

For additional information, contact symposium co-chair Jocelyn Robinson at jocelyn.robinson@wright.edu or 937-241-4618.

Last day to contribute to the Public Broadcasting Preservation Scholarship

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This post was written by Casey Davis, AAPB Project Manager at WGBH, for WGBH’s Public Broadcasting Preservation Scholarship crowdfunding campaign.

We need your help!

Today is the last day to make a financial contribution to the AAPB’s Public Broadcasting Preservation Scholarship. We have raised $2,000 and appreciate your additional support to get us closer to our goal!

What is the Public Broadcasting Preservation Scholarship?

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Scholarship will fund public media representatives from Louisiana Public Broadcasting, Wisconsin Public Television, Minnesota Public Radio, CUNY-TV, Howard University Television (WHUT), WYSO-FM, and Pacifica Radio Archives to participate in a week-long training event focused on digital preservation of public media.

Here’s some additional background info:

WGBH is leading the American Archive of Public Broadcasting National Digital Stewardship Residency program funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. This program supports the creation of seven residencies at public media organizations across the country, focusing on audiovisual digital preservation of public television and radio.

In February, we announced that after some very difficult decision-making among 24 project proposals, we selected the Host Institutions for the NDSR project.

Our fabulous hosts include:

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More information about each host is available on our website:

The residencies will begin in July 2016 with a week-long immersion week in Boston, taught by leading experts in the field of audiovisual preservation. WGBH has launched a crowdfunding campaign to fund the Public Broadcasting Preservation Scholarship, in connection with the AAPB NDSR. The Scholarship will fund the host mentors to travel and participate in immersion week. You can find it here: igg.me/at/aapb-pbps

The scholarship would help host mentors gain and sharpen the skills that are needed to sustain digital preservation activities at beyond the term of the 10-month residency. This knowledge would improve their ability to preserve their at-risk materials for many years to come. As a supporter of the Public Broadcasting Preservation Scholarship, you could take us many steps closer to reaching our goal.

Public broadcasting stations have been on the front lines of history for more than 60 years. Help public media professionals gain the skills necessary to preserve this audiovisual historic record for posterity by supporting the American Archive of Public Broadcasting Public Broadcasting Preservation Scholarship.

We sincerely appreciate any and all support!