Week Four of #PubMedia50: Diversity of Public Broadcasting

*Due to the holiday, join the conversation on Tuesday rather than Thursday, Nov 21nd!

A Month-long Celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50thAnniversary

Three weeks ago we started our month-long commemoration of the 50thanniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson on November 7, 1967. We’re joining in with other public broadcasters and organizations such as PBS, NPR, CPB and APTS to celebrate this momentous milestone in our history.

We learned so much from participating archives and we look forward to this coming week’s theme: Diversity of Public Broadcasting (Community broadcasting, local heritage, unique facts about your research/station).

 

What makes your programming unique? Showcase the diversity of public broadcasting and local heritage documented by public media that is preserved in your collections.

The goal of each challenge is to engage in community, discover histories, share those stories with the public, and start dialogues. Get the theme beforehand by contacting our Engagement and Use Manager, Ryn Marchese at ryn_marchese@wgbh.org, or check out our social pages on Mondays!

You can tune-in to the campaign by posting on Tuesday! We invite public broadcasting organizations, museums, archives, libraries, historians, public media fans, and other cultural organizations to personalize #PubMedia50 and share the stories in your own holdings and memories.

As for us, we’ll be posting content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting every day. Don’t miss a beat and let us know what you think!

See you there!

To get started–

Example Tweets:

“We’re teaming up with @amarchivepub and #PubMedia50 stations to celebrate #PubMedia! Join in and share your history & content!”

“We’re joining @amarchivepub in celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act at #PubMedia50!”

Instagram/Facebook Post:

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, we’ll be posting content to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! Teaming up with @amarchivepub, #PubMedia50 stations, academics, and community members we’ll have a new #PubMedia50 theme each week. Join the conversation by tagging your post with #PubMedia50.

  • You can follow us here:

Instagram: @amarchivepub

Facebook: @amarchivepub

Twitter: @amarchivepub

Week Three of #PubMedia50: Educational Television

A Month-long Celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50thAnniversary

Two weeks ago we started our month-long commemoration of the 50thanniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson on November 7, 1967. We’re joining in with other public broadcasters and organizations such as PBS, NPR, CPB and APTS to celebrate this momentous milestone in our history.

We learned so much from participating archives and we look forward to this coming week’s theme: Educational Television!

The goal of each challenge is to engage in community, discover histories, share those stories with the public, and start dialogues. Get the theme beforehand by contacting our Engagement and Use Manager, Ryn Marchese at ryn_marchese@wgbh.org, or check out our social pages on Mondays!

You can tune-in to the campaign by posting on Thursdays! We invite public broadcasting organizations, museums, archives, libraries, historians, public media fans, and other cultural organizations to personalize #PubMedia50 and share the stories in your own holdings and memories.

As for us, we’ll be posting content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting every day. Don’t miss a beat and let us know what you think!

See you there!

Week 3 | Post content on November 16th (Th): Educational Television 

What are some of your favorite series or programs? What are the earliest programs that your station produced? Who were some of the first producers at your station? Which early series are most representative of the formats and genres created during the early years of public broadcasting? Which ones are still pertinent? What records or content related to early educational programming do you maintain in your archives? How has educational television evolved since its formation? What series are most representative of early educational television in the United States?
To get started:

Example Tweets:

“We’re teaming up with @amarchivepub and #PubMedia50 stations to celebrate #PubMedia! Join in and share your history & content!”

“We’re joining @amarchivepub in celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act at #PubMedia50!”

Instagram/Facebook Post:

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, we’ll be posting content to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! Teaming up with @amarchivepub, #PubMedia50 stations, academics, and community members we’ll have a new #PubMedia50 theme each week. Join the conversation by tagging your post with #PubMedia50.

  • You can follow us here:

Instagram: @amarchivepub

Facebook: @amarchivepub

Twitter: @amarchivepub

American Archive of Public Broadcasting Releases Exclusive Collections

The Library of Congress and WGBH have acquired and preserved original, full-length interviews from The Civil War, Eyes on the Prize and American Masters
  
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) recently acquired three collections of original, full-length interviews from groundbreaking public television documentaries: Ken Burns’ The Civil War, Eyes on the Prize and American Masters. Only excerpts of these interviews were included in previously released, edited programs. Now, the full-length interviews from these landmark series will be available to view online at americanarchive.org or in person at the Library of Congress and at WGBH, preserved for future generations to learn about our nation’s history.
 
The AAPB, a collaboration between the Library of Congress and Boston public media station WGBH, has digitized and preserved more than 50,000 hours of broadcasts and previously inaccessible programs from public radio and public television’s more than 60-year legacy.
 
Interviews from Ken Burns’ The Civil War
 
The Civil War, an epic nine-episode series by the award-winning documentary filmmaker Ken Burns and produced in conjunction with WETA, Washington, DC and American Documentaries, Inc., first aired in September 1990 to an audience of 40 million viewers. The film is the recipient of 40 major film and television awards, including two Emmys and two Grammys.
 
The AAPB The Civil War collection includes eight digitized, full-length interviews with distinguished historians and commentators Barbara J. Fields, C. Vann Woodward, Robert Penn Warren, William Safire, James Symington, Stephen B. Oates, Ed Bearss and Daisy Turner. The Civil War collection is available online athttp://americanarchive.org/special_collections/ken-burns-civil-war.
 
Interviews from Eyes on the Prize
 
Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years 1954–1965 tells the definitive story of the civil rights era from the point of view of the ordinary men and women whose extraordinary actions launched a movement that changed the fabric of American life, and embodied a struggle whose reverberations continue to be felt today. The award-winning documentary series recounts the fight to end decades of discrimination and segregation from the murder of Emmett Till and the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955 and 1956 to the 1965 Voting Rights Campaign in Selma, Alabama. Eyes on the Prize was produced by Blackside, Inc and aired on PBS in 1987.
 
The Eyes on the Prize interviews collection comes from Washington University Libraries’ Henry Hampton Collection and includes 75 hours of full-length interviews with leaders and activists such as Rosa Parks, Constance Baker Motley, James Farmer, Robert Moses, Andrew Young, John Lewis, Ralph Abernathy, Stokely Carmichael and Myrlie Evers. The Eyes on the Prize collection is available online at http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/eotp-i-interviews.
 
Interviews from American Masters
 
American Masters is an award-winning biography series that celebrates American arts and culture. Launched in 1986 on PBS, the series set the standard for documentary film profiles, and is produced by New York’s flagship PBS station THIRTEEN for WNET.
 
AAPB has preserved more than 800 full-length interviews filmed for American Masters with cultural luminaries such as David Bowie, Yoko Ono, Robert Plant, Tim Burton, Nora Ephron, Denzel Washington, Carol Burnett, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Quincy Jones and Jimmy Carter. The interviews, digitized for In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive and the American Masters Podcast, will be archived for long-term storage at the Library of Congress to ensure their survival for future generations. Researchers can access the full collection on location at the Library of Congress and at WGBH. Information about the American Masters collection is available at http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/american-masters-interviews.
 
The AAPB is a national effort to preserve at-risk public media and provide a central web portal for access to the programming that public stations and producers have created over the past 60 years. In its initial phase, the AAPB digitized approximately 40,000 hours of radio and television programming and related materials selected by more than 100 public media stations and organizations across the country. The entire collection is available for research on location at the Library of Congress and WGBH, and currently more than 20,000 programs are available in the AAPB’s Online Reading Room at americanarchive.org to anyone in the United States.
 
– – –
About WGBH
WGBH Boston is America’s preeminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the Web, including Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Frontline, Nova, American Experience, Arthur and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle, and children’s series. WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia™, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, or visually impaired. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards…even two Oscars. Find more information at www.wgbh.org.
 
About the Library of Congress
The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States – and extensive materials from around the world – both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship atcopyright.gov.
 
About the American Archive of Public Broadcasting
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 60 years. To date, over 40,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at the Library of Congress and WGBH, and more than 20,000 programs are available online atamericanarchive.org.

Week Two of #PubMedia50: Radio Broadcasting

A Month-long Celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50th Anniversary

Last week we started our month-long commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson on November 7, 1967. We’re joining in with other public broadcasters and organizations such as PBS, NPR, CPB and APTS to celebrate this momentous milestone in our history.

Thanks to those who participated in sharing their unique personal and institutional histories surrounding the history and preservation of public broadcasting with our first week of ‘Firsts’ and Major Ideas of Public Broadcasting.

We learned so much from your archives and we look forward to this coming week’s theme: Radio Broadcasting!

The goal of each challenge is to engage in community, discover histories, share those stories with the public, and start dialogues. Get the theme beforehand by contacting our Engagement and Use Manager, Ryn Marchese at ryn_marchese@wgbh.org, or check out our social pages on Mondays!

You can tune-in to the campaign by posting on Thursdays! We invite public broadcasting organizations, museums, archives, libraries, historians, public media fans, and other cultural organizations to personalize #PubMedia50 and share the stories in your own holdings and memories.

As for us, we’ll be posting content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting every day. Don’t miss a beat and let us know what you think!

See you there!

Week 2 | Post content on November 9th (Th): Radio Broadcasting 

Who was the voice behind the mic? Who are some local radio pioneers in your community? What local and national radio pioneers inspired you or your institutions? What historic radio materials can you share from your archives this week?
To get started:

Example Tweets:

“We’re teaming up with @amarchivepub and #PubMedia50 stations to celebrate #PubMedia! Join in and share your history & content!”

“We’re joining @amarchivepub in celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act at #PubMedia50!”

Instagram/Facebook Post:

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, we’ll be posting content to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! Teaming up with @amarchivepub, #PubMedia50 stations, academics, and community members we’ll have a new #PubMedia50 theme each week. Join the conversation by tagging your post with #PubMedia50.

  • You can follow us here:

Instagram: @amarchivepub

Facebook: @amarchivepub

Twitter: @amarchivepub

 

Library and WGBH Acquire Historic TV Coverage of Senate Watergate Hearings

Digital Files Now Available on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting Website

Press Contact: Sheryl Cannady, Library of Congress, (202) 707-6456 | Emily Balk, WGBH, (617) 300-5317
Public Contact: Alan Gevinson, Library of Congress, (202) 707-0582 | Karen Cariani, WGBH, (617) 300-4286
Website: “Gavel-to-Gavel”: The Watergate Scandal and Public Television External

The Library of Congress and Boston public broadcaster WGBH announced today that gavel-to-gavel television coverage of the Senate Watergate hearings in 1973, donated to the Library by WETA Washington, D.C., has been digitally preserved and made available online.  Produced by the National Public Affairs Center for Television (NPACT), the hearings were taped during the day and rebroadcast every evening on public television for 51 days, from May 17 to Nov. 15. These broadcasts became one of the most popular series in public broadcasting history.

For the first time in 44 years, these riveting moments in history will once again be available to the American public through an online presentation—“Gavel-to-Gavel: The Watergate Scandal and Public Television”—on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) website at americanarchive.org. AAPB is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH to preserve and make accessible significant at-risk public media.

The presentation will provide access to all the coverage, a highlights reel, episode guide and an essay putting the coverage into historical perspective. Visitors to the online exhibit—curated by 2017 Library of Congress Junior Fellow Amanda Reichenbach—will see firsthand the memorable personalities involved in this national drama and the revelations that ultimately led to resignation of President Richard Nixon. Journalists Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer worked together for the first time as anchors to bring balanced commentary, allowing viewers to experience the full hearings and make their own informed opinions.  The coverage became a model for public television and, later, C-SPAN.

Each episode of the coverage begins with about five minutes of commentary by MacNeil and Lehrer, including a recap of what happened during that day’s hearing. The hearings range from two to seven hours in length. The anchors close out with a 10- to 20-minute wrap-up with experts and interviews conducted by correspondent Peter Kaye. The Senate Watergate Committee conducted its investigation in three phases: Watergate (May 17–Sept. 25), Campaign Practices or “Dirty Tricks” (Sept. 26–Nov. 6) and Campaign Finance (Nov. 7–Nov. 15). Coverage by NPACT of the subsequent House impeachment hearings in May and July 1974 also has been digitized and made available online.

After acquiring the tapes, the Library digitized nearly 352 hours of NPACT’s continuous coverage. The digital content was transferred to WGBH for inclusion in AAPB. Nearly a third of AAPB’s complete collection of 50,000 hours of preserved public TV and radio content is now available online for research, educational and informational purposes.

WGBH Boston is America’s pre-eminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the web, including “Masterpiece,” “Antiques Roadshow,” “Frontline,” “Nova,” “American Experience,” “Arthur” and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle and children’s series. WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind or visually impaired. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards and two Oscars. Find more information at wgbh.org.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Announcement: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-17-167/library-and-wgbh-acquire-historic-tv-coverage-of-senate-watergate-hearings/2017-11-03/

Tune-In with #PubMedia50

A Month-long Celebration of the Public Broadcasting Act’s 50th Anniversary

Happy UNESCO World Day for Audiovisual Heritage! What better day than today to kick-off our month-long commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson on November 7, 1967. We’re joining in with other public broadcasters and organizations such as PBS, NPR, CPB and APTS to celebrate this momentous milestone in our history.

To celebrate the anniversary, we’re inviting you to a five-week social media campaign encouraging institutions and individuals to share their unique personal and institutional histories surrounding the history and preservation of public broadcasting.

Every week beginning in November 2017, we’ll issue a new #PubMedia50 challenge. The goal of each challenge is to engage in community, discover histories, share those stories with the public, and start dialogues. Get the theme beforehand by contacting our Engagement and Use Manager, Ryn Marchese at ryn_marchese@wgbh.org, or check out our social pages on Mondays!

Tune-in on Thursdays! We invite public broadcasting organizations, museums, archives, libraries, historians, public media fans, and other cultural organizations to personalize #PubMedia50 and share the stories in your own holdings and memories.

As for us, we’ll be posting content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting every day. Don’t miss a beat and let us know what you think!

But we’ll give you a sneak peek, here’s the theme to Week One!

Week 1 | Post your content on November 2nd (Th): Firsts and Major Ideas 

(First Broadcasts/ First Broadcasters / Major Contributors / Major Ideas)

Share your ‘firsts’! What was the first public broadcasting program or series you watched? When did your station go on the air? Who were the major supporters and early pioneers that led to the development of public broadcasting in the United States? What ideas inspired the formation of public broadcasting and public programming? What are the earliest and most significant public broadcasting content and records in your collections?

  • To get started:

Example Tweets:

“We’re teaming up with @amarchivepub and #PubMedia50 stations to celebrate #PubMedia! Join in and share your history & content!”

“We’re joining @amarchivepub in celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act at #PubMedia50!”

Instagram/Facebook Post:

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, we’ll be posting content to celebrate the history and preservation of public broadcasting! Teaming up with @amarchivepub, #PubMedia50 stations, academics, and community members we’ll have a new #PubMedia50 theme each week. Join the conversation by tagging your post with #PubMedia50.

  • You can follow us here:

Instagram: @amarchivepub

Facebook: @amarchivepub

Twitter: @amarchivepub

PubMedia

(Photo: Yoichi Okamoto, LBJ Library)