PBCore Development Priorities

As part of our NEH-funded PBCore Development and Training Project, we’re developing tools and resources around PBCore, a metadata schema and data model designed to describe and manage audiovisual collections.

Based on feedback from a previous survey to users and potential users, we’ve generated a list of tools and resources that previous respondents indicated would be valuable to the archival and broadcasting communities. Now, we’re looking for feedback on what to prioritize that will be of real use to the archives and public media communities.

Please fill out this short survey – which should take at most five minutes – to check out our development plans and give your feedback on where we should focus our efforts: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/WPF3QZD

Thanks for taking the time to fill out the survey! You can read more about the PBCore Development and Training Project here and see the PBCore website here.

AAPB NDSR Resources Roundup

In 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services awarded a generous grant to WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) to develop the AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR). Through the grant, we placed residents at public media organizations around the country to complete digital stewardship projects.

After a fantastic final presentation at the Society of American Archivists meeting in Portland last month, the 2016-2017 AAPB NDSR residencies have now officially drawn to a close. We wanted to share with you a complete list of the resources generated throughout the residencies, including instructional webinars, blog posts, and resources created for stations over the course of the NDSR projects.

Resources

Audiorecorder (Open-Source Audio Digitization Tool)

CUNY TV Mediamicroservices Documentation

KBOO 2-Page Recommendation Summary

KBOO Digital Preservation Policy

KBOO Current Digital Storage and Archiving Practices

KBOO Diagram for Current Digital Program Production Practices

PBCore-Based Data Model for KBOO Analog Audio Assets

Workflow for Open-Reel Preservation at KBOO

KBOO Digital Audio Guidelines and Procedures

Recommended Next Steps for Developing an Integrated Searchable Database of Born-Digital and Analog Audio at KBOO

Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan

WHUT Naming Conventions for Local Programming

Wisconsin Public Television Microsoft Access Database to PBCore Crosswalk

Wisconsin Public Television AMS Workflows Documentation

Wisconsin Public Television Digitization Workflows Chart

Wisconsin Public Television Proposal for New Metadata Database

Resident Webinars

Challenges of Removable Media in Digital Preservation,” by Eddy Colloton (slides)

Demystifying FFmpeg/FFprobe,” by Andrew Weaver (slides)

Intro to Data Manipulation with Python CSV,” by Adam Lott (slides)

Through the Trapdoor: Metadata and Disambiguation in Fanfiction,” by Kate McManus (slides)

ResourceSpace for Audiovisual Archiving,” by Selena Chau (slides) (Demo videos: 1, 2, 3, 4)

Whats, Whys, and How Tos of Web Archiving,” by Lorena Ramírez-López (slides) (transcript)

Other Webinars

“Metadata: Storage, Modeling and Quality,” by Kara Van Malssen, Partner & Senior Consultant at AVPreserve (slides only)

Public Media Production Workflows,” by Leah Weisse, WGBH Digital Archive Manager/Production Archival Compliance Manager (slides)

Imposter Syndrome” by Jen LaBarbera, Head Archivist at Lambda Archives of San Diego, and Dinah Handel, Mass Digitization Coordinator at the NYPL (slides)

Preservation and Access: Digital Audio,” by Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director and AV Conservator at the Southern Folklife Collection (slides)

Troubleshooting Digital Preservation,” by Shira Peltzman, Digital Archivist at UCLA Library (slides)

Studs Terkel Radio Archive: Tips and Tricks for Sharing Great Audio,” by Grace Radkins, Digital Content Librarian at Studs Terkel Radio Library (slides)

From Theory to Action: Digital Preservation Tools and Strategies,” by Danielle Spalenka, Project Director of the Digital POWRR Project (slides)

Resident Blog Posts

Digital Stewardship at KBOO Community Radio,” Selena Chau (8/9/16)

Metadata Practices at Minnesota Public Radio,” Kate McManus (8/15/16)

NDSA, data wrangling, and KBOO treasures,” Selena Chau (8/30/16)

Minnesota Books and Authors,” Kate McManus (9/23/16)

Snapshot from the IASA Conference: Thoughts on the 2nd Day,” Eddy Colloton (9/29/16)

Who just md5deep-ed and redirected all them checksums to a .csv file? This gal,” Lorena Ramírez-López (10/6/16)

IASA Day 1 and Voice to Text Recognition,” Selena Chau (10/11/16)

IASA – Remixed,” Kate McManus (10/12/16)

Learning GitHub (or, if I can do it, you can too!)” Andrew Weaver (10/13/16)
Home Movie Day,” Eddy Colloton (10/15/16)

Snakes in the Archive,” Adam Lott (10/20/16)

Vietnam, Oral Histories, and the WYSO Archives Digital Humanities Symposium,” Tressa Graves (11/7/16)

Archives in Conversation (A Glimpse into the Minnesota Archives Symposium, 2016),” Kate McManus (11/15/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 1: SpaceSaver,” Lorena Ramírez-López (11/21/16)

Is there something that does it all?: Choosing a metadata management system,” Selena Chau (11/22/16)

Inside the WHUT video library clean-up – part 2: lots of manual labor,” Lorena Ramírez-López (12/20/16)

Just Ask For Help Already!” Eddy Colloton (12/22/16)

Playing with Pandas: CSV metadata transformations,” Selena Chau (1/4/17)

MPR50,” Kate McManus (2/8/17)

Before & after XML to PBCore in ResourceSpace,” Selena Chau (2/9/17)

Advocating for Archives in a Production Environment,” Eddy Colloton (2/27/17)

Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan,” Eddy Colloton (3/6/17)

Moving Beyond the Allegory of the Lone Digital Archivist (& my day of Windows scripting at KBOO,” Selena Chau (3/16/17)

Save the Data!” Kate McManus (3/16/17)

Professional Development Time Project: Audiorecorder,” Andrew Weaver (3/27/17)

Library Technology Conference,” Kate McManus (3/29/17)

Reporting from PNW: Online Northwest Conference,” Selena Chau (4/13/17)

Adventures in Perceptual Hashing,” Andrew Weaver (4/20/17)

Trying New Things: Meditations on NDSR from the Symposium in DC,” Kate McManus (5/3/17)

Filmed Immersion Week Sessions

Why Archive Public Media

The History of Public Media and the AAPB

Mastering Project Management

Growing Your Professional Profile

Negotiating at Work

Think Like a Computer

Get To Know Your Audiovisual Media 

Many of these resources can also be found on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting Wiki, created by the residents for their collaborative final project.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Silent Thunder

This week’s Vision Maker Media film focuses on Arapaho elder Stanford Addison, a quadriplegic spiritual leader who trains wild horses on the Wind River Reservation.

Told primarily in the voices of Addison and those around him, “Silent Thunder” demonstrates Addison’s unique method of training horses — and people — while encouraging them to keep their spirit.

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Watch “Silent Thunder” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramTumblrLinkedInVimeoPinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: My Louisiana Love

In this week’s Vision Maker Media film, Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to find a place with her Houma Indian family, and becomes a witness to the impact of decades of environmental degradation.  As Monique’s losses mount, she finds herself turning to environmental activism, documenting her family’s struggle to stay close to the land despite the rapidly disappearing coastline and a cycle of disasters that includes two devastating hurricanes and the worst oil spill in US history.

“My Louisiana Love” provides an intimate documentary portrait of the impact on the oil industry and man-made environmental crises on the indigenous community of the Mississippi Delta.

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Watch “My Louisiana Love” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramTumblrLinkedInVimeoPinterest, or Google+.

 

 

 

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Smokin’ Fish

This week’s featured Vision Maker Media film follows Cory Mann, a Tlingit businessman hustling to make a dollar in Juneau, Alaska, as he follows an impulse to spend a summer smoking salmon the way his great-grandmother used to do.

“Smokin’ Fish” interweaves the story of Mann’s family, his bills and his business with the untold history of the Tlingit and the process of preparing this traditional food. By turns tragic, bizarre, or just plain ridiculous, Smokin’ Fish illustrates one man’s attempts to navigate the messy zone of collision between the modern world and an ancient culture.

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Watch “Smokin’ Fish” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramTumblrLinkedInVimeoPinterest, or Google+.

Launching the American Archive of Public Broadcasting Wiki

The residency period of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) project has now ended, but we’re very proud to launch the final project created by our AAPB NDSR residents: The American Archive of Public Broadcasting Wiki, a technical preservation resource guide for public media organizations.

Selena Chau, Eddy Colloton, Adam Lott, Kate McManus, Lorena Ramírez-López, and Andrew Weaver have highlighted their collaboration and shared their resources, workflows, and documents used for managing audiovisual assets in all their possible formats and environments.  The resulting Wiki encompasses everything from the first stages of the planning process to exit strategies from a storage or database solution.

AAPB staff and the residents hope that this Wiki will be an evolving resource. Editing capabilities will be locked on the Wiki for one week following launch, to allow time for the creation of a web archive of the resource in its original form that the residents may use in their portfolios; after this period, we will open up account creation to the audiovisual archiving and public broadcasting communities. We welcome your participation and contributions!

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Who Owns the Past?

This week’s featured Vision Maker Media film focuses on the discovery of a 9,000-year-old skeleton on the banks of the Columbia River near Kennewick, Washington, which reignited the battle between anthropologists and Indian people over the control of human remains found on ancestral Indian lands.

“Who Owns the Past?” shows how the controversy that surrounded Kennewick Man became a test case for the Native American Graves Repatriation and Protection Act, and delves into the roots of a conflict that reach back to the very beginnings of American history.

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Watch “Who Owns the Past?” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

 

 

Forty Films, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: The Oneida Speak

In the 1930s, a group of elders from the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin participated in FDR’s Works Progress Administration Writers Project and shared stories of their life on the farm. In numerous journals written in Oneida, the elders recall historical personal accounts of detrimental land-grabbing policies, and the devastating impact of small pox and boarding schools.

This week’s Emmy-nominated Vision Maker Media film uses these first-person accounts to blend traditional Oneida storytelling with modern media, providing a window to a world that no longer exists.

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Watch “The Oneida Speak” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

 

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Injunuity

This week’s featured Vision Maker Media film is an eye-popping, mind-jolting mix of animation, music and real voices collected from interviews with Native Americans across the country to create a distinct view of modern America from a uniquely contemporary Native American perspective.

Told through nine short films that cover such topics as language preservation, sacred site degradation, consumerism and the environment, “Injunuity” is a thought-provoking collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present and our undiscovered future.

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Watch “Injunuity” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Navajo Code Talkers

The Navajo Marines who used their language as an essential defensive weapon during WWII tell their story in this week’s award-winning Vision Maker Media film.

Using archival footage and first-person interviews, the 1982 film was one of the first documentary features to present the history of the Navajo Code Talkers after decades of classified secrecy, and share the compelling story of their contributions to the war.

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Watch “Navajo Code Talkers” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.