Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks – Kinaalda: Navajo Rite of Passage

In this week’s featured Vision Maker Media film, filmmaker Lena Carr documents her niece’s Kinaaldá — a Navajo celebration of the transition from childhood to womanhood that the filmmaker herself was unable to experience.

In documenting the four-day coming-of-age ceremony, Carr provides a rare insider’s look at Navajo culture and the complexities of growing up Navajo in contemporary times, while telling a deeply personal story about herself and her family.

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Watch “Kinaaldá: a Navajo Rite of Passage” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

 

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Rocks With Wings

In 1980, Jerry Richardson, a 24-year-old black man from East Texas who had just finished college in Louisiana, took a job coaching the varsity girls’ basketball team in the depressed Navajo town of Shiprock, New Mexico. The Lady Chieftains launch themselves on a journey towards victory — but success comes at a cost, and behind-the-scenes conflict over Jerry’s methods builds to an explosive finale.

This week’s featured Vision Maker Media film, “Rocks With Wings,” is a story of winning and losing, of struggling with race, heritage and societal expectations for the players, their coach and the entire Navajo community.

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Watch “Rocks With Wings” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Apache 8

“You never knew what you were going to face … you were with a bunch of women that could handle anything.”

This week’s Vision Maker Media film, “Apache 8,” tells the story of an all-women wildland firefighter crew from the White Mountain Apache Tribe, who have been fighting fires in Arizona and throughout the U.S. for over 30 years. Four extraordinary women from different generations of the Apache 8 crew share their personal narratives with humor and tenderness. “Apache 8” weaves together a compelling tale of these remarkable firefighters, revealed for the first time.

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Watch “Apache 8” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan

In 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services awarded a generous grant to WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) to develop the AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR). Through this project, we have placed seven graduates of master’s degree programs in digital stewardship residencies at public media organizations around the country.This post was written by resident Eddy Colloton, who has just concluded his residency project with the completion of a digital preservation plan for Louisiana Public Broadcasting, his host institution:

I have completed my NDSR AAPB residency at Louisiana Public Broadcasting (LPB)! While most of my cohort will continue chugging along for another few months, I sadly have to finish up a bit early. But, I’m leaving for an exciting opportunity in the conservation department at the Denver Art Museum. I’m feeling good about the time I have spent here at LPB, and the work that we have accomplished. I may even chime in on the ol’ AAPB NDSR blog again down the line, once I’ve had time to lean into some post-residency navel gazing.

Please find my primary deliverable to LPB, the LPB Digital Preservation Plan, below. The objective of this document was to document the station’s current digital preservation procedures, and to make recommendations for improvement. The plan discusses the benefits of creating MediaInfo and MediaConch reports, as well as fixity checks, and how to apply those tools in a production environment. The plan also describes the benefits of using uncompressed and lossless codecs for the preservation of analog video, the methodology and strategy behind planning for LTO tape generation migrations, the importance of collecting production documentation in audiovisual archiving, and much more. While the policies and procedures described in the plan are specific to LPB, I think that there’s certainly information to be gleaned from the plan whether you are working in a public broadcasting archive or not.

I want to offer my thanks to everyone at LPB for being so welcoming to a stranger from the north, and for helping me with so many aspects of my project. I want to offer a special thanks to my host mentor, Leslie Bourgeois, who in spite of having a very difficult year due to the historic flooding that occurred Baton Rouge in August of 2016, has been supportive and encouraging of my work here at LPB. I would also be remiss if I didn’t thank Rebecca Fraimow, the NDSR program coordinator, for constantly being there for me and the rest of the cohort over the last 7 months. And of course a very special thanks to my NDSR cohort for letting me ask them questions, vent to them about my struggles, and allowing me to share a barrage of my dumb jokes. I wish you all the best. AAPB NDSR 4 lyfe!

Download the Louisiana Public Broadcasting Digital Preservation Plan

Voegeli and Setziol Radio Collections Added to the Online Reading Room

In the past few months, we’ve added several new radio collections to our Online Reading Room!

The Donald Voegeli collection preserves the music and memory of Don Voegeli, who wrote the theme music for All Things Considered on NPR, along with providing many other contributions to public radio over the course of a long and impressive career.

Variations on the  All Things Considered theme make up just a fraction of the Don Voegeli collection. There’s also plenty of Voegeli’s other work to explore, from musical compositions in the vein of the ATC theme like Swiss Clock Maker to catchy educational jingles like Math Song (“you bisect an angle by using a ruler and compass / you bisect a compass by using a good sharp axe”)

Donald Voegeli’s son Jim Voegeli, a radio producer in his own right, has also contributed four audio documentaries of his own as a separate collection. “Speaking of Wilderness,” Jim’s first documentary on the importance of the conservation of wild places, aired on NPR when he was only 16.  Jim’s piece “Remembering Aldo Leopold,” a radio documentary essay on the life and legacy of the visionary conservationist and writer, went on to win an Ohio State Award.

Finally, for more award-winning environmental journalism, check out our newest collection of works by Ilsa Setziol, longtime environmental reporter for KPCC. Among other honors, Setziol has been recognized for Outstanding Beat Reporting in Radio by the Society of Environmental Journalists for pieces like this 2003 report on the environmental aftermath of fires in San Bernardino County, “Fire Recovery, Part 1.”

The archive of Setziol’s work for KPCC offers an invaluable record of environmental concerns and activism from the past 20 years, from reports on the projected devastating impact of global warming in California to stories of activists like Josh Quigley, who spent months sitting in an oak tree to try and save it from being cut down.

Browse the collections to listen to hundreds more great radio pieces:

Donald Voegeli
James F. Voegeli
KPCC (Ilsa Setziol)

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Waterbuster

“My grandmother rarely spoke of the days of the Garrison Dam and the flooding of our ancestral lands, but when she did, she always spoke of what lay below as her true home. I have come back here to reclaim that home and what was denied to my generation and all the generations that will follow.”

In this week’s featured Vision Maker Media film, producer J. Carlos Peinado returns to his grandmother’s home on the Fort Berthold Reservation, which was flooded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1947 for the building of the Garrison Dam. “Waterbuster” explores the aftermath of the flooding through the perspective of the displaced Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara people, giving light to a portrait of resilience and survival in the face of catastrophic change.

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Watch “Waterbuster” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: The Last Conquistador

All sculptor John Houser wanted to do was build the largest bronze equestrian statue in the world — but art doesn’t exist in a vacuum, as explored in this week’s featured Vision Maker Media film.

“The Last Conquistador” tells the story of how the city of El Paso’s decision to commission Houser’s statue of Spanish conquistador Juan de Oñate opened deep divides among the city’s inhabitants and sparked a decade of protest by members of the Acoma tribe, who remember Oñate not for deeds of exploration, but for the massacres, slavery and terror he brought to the original inhabitants of New Mexico.

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Watch “The Last Conquistador” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks – For the Rights of All: Ending Jim Crow in Alaska

Learn more about the struggle for Alaskan Native civil rights in this week’s featured Vision Maker Media film, “For the Rights of All: Ending Jim Crow in Alaska.”

This blend of documentary and drama depicts a growing activist movement for citizenship, voting rights, and school desegregation, culminating in the Senate testimony of activist of Tlingit activist Elizabeth Peratrovich, who swayed the floor vote in favor of the passage of the 1945 Anti-Discrimination Act – the first civil rights bill passed in the United States since the Civil War.

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Watch “For the Rights of All: Ending Jim Crow in Alaska” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Aleut Story

Follow the incredible story of the Aleuts’ decades-long struggle for human and civil rights in this week’s featured Vision Maker Media film, “Aleut Story.”

In 1942, as World War II reached Alaska, Aleut Americans were transferred to government camps 1,500 miles away, where an estimated 10 percent perished. The surviving Aleuts eventually joined Japanese Americans in seeking wartime reparations from the federal government. Narrated by Martin Sheen and featuring an original music score by composer Alan Koshiyama, this poignant, richly textured film contains rare archival images and compelling interviews with Aleut internment survivors — many of whom are speaking out for the first time in more than 60 years.

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Watch “Aleut Story” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: The Return of Navajo Boy

This week, Vision Maker Media presents the acclaimed international documentary that reunited a family and triggered a federal investigation into uranium contamination, “The Return of Navajo Boy.”

The award-winning film chronicles an incredible struggle for environmental justice through the story of the Cly family, who appeared in a silent 1950s film titled The Navajo Boy. The reappearance of the film not only reveals the devastating effects of uranium mining around Monument Valley, but reunites a long-lost brother with the family. A powerful new epilogue (produced in 2008) shows how the film and the outreach campaign around it has created news, rallied supporters, and impacted the discussion around environmental reform.

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Watch “The Return of Navajo Boy” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Vimeo, Pinterest, or Google+.