The AAPB Transcribe to Digitize Challenge Comes to a Close

The Transcribe to Digitize Challenge was launched in 2019 as a preservation effort by the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) and George Blood L.P., a digitization service provider. The challenge was simple: George Blood would digitize one analog tape (for free!) for every transcript that was corrected in AAPB’s online transcript editor FIX IT+.

Seven stations that have contributed content to the AAPB joined the Challenge and thanks to their crowdsourcing efforts, 551 corrected transcripts are now searchable and accessible online and 551 tapes are being digitized by George Blood for long-term preservation and public access in the AAPB.

Below is a breakdown of completed transcripts per participating organization! To read more about the initiative, visit How to FIX IT+ and Why: Crowdsourcing to Save Public Media, or continue the effort at fixitplus.americanarchive.org!

KOPN, MO | 38 transcripts completed

Louisiana Public Broadcasting, LA | 109 transcripts completed

Rocky Mountain PBS, CO| 125 transcripts completed

Thirteen WNET, NY| 20 transcripts completed

WGBH, MA | 100 transcripts completed

PBS Wisconsin, WI | 103 transcripts completed

WXXI, NY | 56 transcripts completed


About the American Archive of Public Broadcasting   
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 70 years. To date, over 110,000 digital files of television and radio programming contributed by more than 120 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been preserved and made accessible for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at the Library of Congress and WGBH, and more than 52,000 files are available online at americanarchive.org.  

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