Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: The Medicine Game

Vision Maker Media’s “Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks” promotion concludes this week with our final featured Vision Maker Media film.

“The Medicine Game” follows the story of brothers from the Onondaga Nation who pursue their dreams of playing lacrosse for Syracuse University. With their dream nearly in reach, the boys are caught in a constant struggle to define their Native identity, live-up to their family’s expectations and balance challenges on and off the Reservation.

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Watch “The Medicine Game” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Vision Maker Media would like to thank all the viewers who tuned in to stream 40 Years. 40 Films. 40 Weeks. In the last 40 years, the organization has created more than 500 films, awarded $11 million to independent producers and held hundreds of film-screening events across the nation. While only a portion of that was able to be shared in the last 40 weeks, Vision Maker Media hopes that these films have inspired viewers to look at the world through Indigenous eyes.

The AAAPB has been proud to collaborate with Vision Maker Media to share these films and celebrate the amazing work done by Vision Maker Media over the past forty years.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, http://www.visionmakermedia.org

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Silent Thunder

This week’s Vision Maker Media film focuses on Arapaho elder Stanford Addison, a quadriplegic spiritual leader who trains wild horses on the Wind River Reservation.

Told primarily in the voices of Addison and those around him, “Silent Thunder” demonstrates Addison’s unique method of training horses — and people — while encouraging them to keep their spirit.

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Watch “Silent Thunder” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramTumblrLinkedInVimeoPinterest, or Google+.

Summer in the City: Farmers’ Markets and Their Origins

As an intern at the American Archive of Public Broadcasting at WGBH, I am living in Boston for the first time. I’ve decided to make it my goal to explore the city and since it’s summertime, the sun is out and beckoning the city’s inhabitants to head outside. One popular activity is frequenting the farmers’ markets that Boston has to offer! The City of Boston reports that it handles almost thirty markets, but that number doesn’t even include the numerous markets that are in the surrounding suburbs. But when did farmers’ markets become so popular? We might take their existence for granted now, but they haven’t always had the thriving customer base they do today. Looking through content at the American Archive of Public Broadcasting, we can see how farmers’ markets have evolved throughout the years.

In July of 1978, a Boston WGBH production called GBH Journal presented a story about a farmers’ market in Dorchester. In the story, the reporter explains how the markets provide benefits for both the farmers and the buyers. For example, the farmers can “bypass the middle person” and the consumers pay “less for their produce and also get fresh, nutritious vegetables and fruits for their money.” The program also describes how farmers’ markets aid the economy in Massachusetts by providing an economic boost for struggling farmers and an affordable food source for lower-income citizens. This same farmers’ market in Dorchester still runs today at Fields Corner every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Farmers’ markets continued to grow in popularity throughout the country, and in 2007, Tampa public broadcasting station WEDU ran a storyScreen Shot 2017-06-30 at 11.55.36 AM about a popular market in Sarasota, Florida on its series Gulf Coast Journal with Jack Perkins. Featured is a local citrus farmer, Tim Brown of Brown’s Grove Citrus and Produce. Brown talks about the high quality of his family’s produce, emphasizing its freshness: “the citrus that we pick on Friday night is on the street Saturday morning.” Tony Souza from the Downtown Partnership of Sarasota explains the market’s popularity in the clip, stating that “the locals come up because it’s the thing to do.” Throughout the story, the program highlights the community involvement found at farmers’ markets as a main attraction. Like the Dorchester market in Boston, the Sarasota farmers’ market still runs every Saturday. The Brown family even still sells their produce.

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To understand why farmers’ markets are popular today, it is helpful to understand how organic and small farmers gained prevalence in an industry that favors corporate, high-quantity producers. In September of 2004 at Washington State University, Northwest Public Television recorded a presentation by the former Executive Director of the Organic Farming Research Foundation (OFRF), Bob Scowcroft. In this talk, Scowcroft discusses how the OFRF assisted in bringing national attention to organic farming, citing press interviews, conferences, and researching for grants as key factors to its success. He also reads a passage from a 1970 LIFE magazine, quoting “the ideas are simple and appealing: we eat too much, mostly of the wrong things; our food comes to us not as nature intended, but altered by man during both growth and processing.” As a pioneer in organic farming, Scowcroft offers insight to how organic, small farming has grown throughout the years and the challenges it still faces.

Today, farmers’ markets continue to flourish. In 1978, public broadcasting aimed to inform the public about the basic facts of farmers’ markets. Thirty years later in 2007, public broadcasting instead demonstrated how farmers’ markets had become a community staple where people from different backgrounds could come together to support the local economy. These markets remain an excellent way to learn, explore, and enjoy a variety of unique and vibrant cultural areas all over the United States and even beyond its borders.

hannah_gore_headshotThis post was written by Hannah Gore, AAPB Intro to Media Archives Intern and student at Dickinson College.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: My Louisiana Love

In this week’s Vision Maker Media film, Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to find a place with her Houma Indian family, and becomes a witness to the impact of decades of environmental degradation.  As Monique’s losses mount, she finds herself turning to environmental activism, documenting her family’s struggle to stay close to the land despite the rapidly disappearing coastline and a cycle of disasters that includes two devastating hurricanes and the worst oil spill in US history.

“My Louisiana Love” provides an intimate documentary portrait of the impact on the oil industry and man-made environmental crises on the indigenous community of the Mississippi Delta.

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Watch “My Louisiana Love” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramTumblrLinkedInVimeoPinterest, or Google+.

 

 

 

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Smokin’ Fish

This week’s featured Vision Maker Media film follows Cory Mann, a Tlingit businessman hustling to make a dollar in Juneau, Alaska, as he follows an impulse to spend a summer smoking salmon the way his great-grandmother used to do.

“Smokin’ Fish” interweaves the story of Mann’s family, his bills and his business with the untold history of the Tlingit and the process of preparing this traditional food. By turns tragic, bizarre, or just plain ridiculous, Smokin’ Fish illustrates one man’s attempts to navigate the messy zone of collision between the modern world and an ancient culture.

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Watch “Smokin’ Fish” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramTumblrLinkedInVimeoPinterest, or Google+.

Forty Years through Women’s Healthcare

As lawmakers currently decide the future of American healthcare, many politicians and organizations are seizing the opportunity to express their own sentiments on the subject. A particularly hot topic has been how the new law will affect women, which has long been a controversial subject in the United States. The modern women’s healthcare movement has its roots in the figure of Margaret Sanger. Though she had to take temporary asylum in Europe after illegally distributing contraceptive information, Sanger eventually established the modern-day Planned Parenthood in 1921. To learn more about the evolution of women’s healthcare, content from the American Archive of Public Broadcasting facilitates an analysis of how public opinion of healthcare has developed over the last forty years.

In the 70s, WNScreen Shot 2017-06-22 at 12.05.17 PMED of Buffalo, N.Y. produced a series of interviews entitled “Woman.” On Dec. 4, 1975, WNED recorded an episode with breast cancer advocate Rose Kushner. Interviewed by Sandra Elkin, Kushner criticizes the routine medical practices taken in treatment of breast cancer in the United States. Instead, she praises the practices of other countries with nationalized healthcare systems: “There is a big difference in countries where medicine is nationalized,” she explains. For context, a timeline by PBS reports that in the 70s, healthcare was “seen as in crisis” due to the quickly rising costs.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 1.06.18 PMAbout twenty years later in 1992, healthcare costs continued to rise due to economic inflation. On July 29, Kojo Nnmadi hosted a group of four women to speak on his WHUT-produced program, Evening Exchange, in Washington, D.C. The guests included physician Maggie Covington, naturopathologist Andrea Sullivan, president of the National Black Women’s Health project Julia Scott, and president of the Black Lesbian Support Group Cindy Smith. In the program, Scott explains her view that minority women do not receive enough care in medicine, stating that “there is a lot happening in our society that has to do with racism and classicism that makes poor women be much more ill than other segments of the population.” The program ends with the conclusion that women need greater representation in the healthcare system, as Cindy Smith asserts “it’s still a man’s world.”

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 2.08.15 PMAnother twenty years later, President Barack Obama signed into existence his healthcare reform bill in 2010. In a 2013 Louisiana Public Broadcasting broadcast, Donna Fraiche speaks at the Baton Rotary Club on the now three-year-old Affordable Care Act. Although moving away from the lens of the female experience, she details the high costs of American healthcare. Notably, Fraiche outlines that “we’re the richest country in the world, but we spend the most of our dollars on healthcare.” Her knowledge of Japan allows her to explain the differences in the American and Japanese systems, since she served as honorary consul-general of Japan for New Orleans.

Today, this passion for a stronger healthcare system thrives as the American people continue the journey to find a system that is beneficial for our country. Though laws and politics may continue to change, history affirms our dedication towards bettering our medical care. In these programs, the women all had drastically different perspectives and backgrounds, ranging from writers to lawyers to advocates. Yet, they all provided information that helped to develop and challenge public notions of healthcare in the United States.

This post was written by Hannah Gore, AAPB Intro to Media Archives Intern and student at Dickinson College.

Forty Years, Forty Films, Forty Weeks: Sousa on the Rez

This week’s featured Vision Maker Media film focuses on Native American marching bands, their history, and their players’ relationships with American and Western music. The film contains interviews with musicians in Native American bands and features both contemporary and historical footage of Native players.

“Sousa on the Rez” examines the history of American marching music, the influence of boarding schools on Native American musicians, stereotypes, and the continuing legacy of Native American marching bands throughout the country.

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Watch “Sousa on the Rez” on the American Archive of Public Broadcasting website.

Check back here every Tuesday, or follow us at @amarchivepub on Twitter to keep up with featured streaming films over the 40 weeks of the celebration. You can find the complete schedule here.

About Vision Maker Media

Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality American Indian and Alaska Native educational and home videos. All aspects of Vision Maker Media programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media – to be the next generation of storytellers. Vision Maker Media envisions a world changed and healed by understanding Native stories and the public conversations they generate.

With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Vision Maker Media’s Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media community. Vision Maker Media, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) empowers and engages Native People to tell stories. For more information, www.visionmakermedia.org

Each week for the next forty weeks, a different film featuring Native voices from Native producers will be available to stream free online, in celebration of Vision Maker Media’s 40 years supporting American Indian and Alaska Native film projects.

Follow Vision Maker Media on FacebookTwitterYouTubeInstagramTumblrLinkedInVimeoPinterest, or Google+.

AAPB Debuts New Online Exhibit “Structuring the News: The Magazine Format in Public Media”

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) has launched a new digital exhibit about newsmagazines, a popular form of news presentation spanning five decades of radio and television broadcasting. Departing from mainstream examples such as 60 Minutes and All Things Considered, the exhibit brings together unique programs produced by independent stations from across the country for the first time as a unified collection. The newsmagazines showcased in “Structuring the News” cover topics from labor strikes to a day in the life of an air traffic controller, and emphasize conversations and voices often overlooked by network news shows.

“Structuring the News” is curated by Digital Exhibits Intern Alejandra Dean, and highlights 42 definitive examples representing both metropolitan producers and smaller, regional studios. Many of the shows in the exhibit prioritize local issues and communities, providing a window into American daily life from 1976-2016. In addition to defining the format, the exhibit looks at important precursors during the 1960s that experimented with news reporting.

“Structuring the News” can be accessed online at http://americanarchive.org/exhibits/newsmagazines.

To celebrate the launch of “Structuring the News: The Magazine Format in Public Media”, the exhibit’s curator, Alejandra Dean, AAPB Project Manager Casey Davis Kaufman, and Mark Williams, Professor of Film and Media Studies at Dartmouth College, will be discussing newsmagazines in a Facebook Live event at 12pm EDT on Thursday, July 6th. Don’t miss this inside look at over fifty years of broadcast newsmagazines, and the chance to ask questions about the exhibit! To watch, head to WGBH’s Facebook page at 12pm EDT on July 6th.

Pride in 1978

“Come on out! Join us, bring a friend!” This joyous sentiment, spoken by Harvey Milk at the San Francisco parade for the 8th Gay Freedom Day in 1978, still resonates today. Over the past month, there have been countless events right here in Boston, and across the country, celebrating LGBTQ+ pride. In the last week of Pride Month, WGBH wanted to take the opportunity to look back on the history of the Pride movement in the United States through some broadcasts in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting.

This particular program is a sound portrait of one of the first pride parades in the United States, and captures the spirit of Pride that we still see today. Upon listening to the program, one can hear many chants and songs, some silly and lighthearted, like, “we’re here because we’re queer because we’re here because we’re queer,” and also serious, “Ain’t gonna let Anita Bryant turn us around,” referencing the famed anti-gay rights activist. Fresh off the heels of the Dade County-Miami decision, and just as the Briggs Initiative was proposed in California, sound bites and interviews in this program captures the sentiment of the LGBTQ+ movement in this moment in time.

Many of those participating in the parade were interviewed about the Briggs Initiative, also known as California Proposition 6, which would have banned gay men and lesbian women, as well as their straight allies, from working in the California public school system. This initiative was one of the most important gay rights issue in California at this time. One parade-goer states, “My friends, anyone who supports my right to be gay, can be fired, just for believing that. People think of it in terms of, it’s a gay rights issue, as opposed to being a free speech issue.” Another states, “If you’re white, male, straight, educated, and, uh, well-off, then that’s who gets the rights in this country. It’s been everyone else who’s had to go out into the streets and fight for their rights.” As is still true today, Pride parades have not only been a space for celebration, but also a space for activism, since their very beginnings.

One thing the listener notes is how diverse the interviewees are. They range from Vietnam veterans, to parents, to straight allies, to Mormons, to businessmen. There are people who believe that others are playing into gay stereotypes, and those who are completely unapologetic of their own flamboyance. There is even one man interviewed who does not even know that there is a gay pride parade happening until he is informed by the interviewer. All of these people unapologetically give their opinions on the parade, as well as gay rights, to the interviewers.

This sound portrait is only one of many broadcasts in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting that traces the LGBTQ+ movement in American history and broadcasting. As one parade-goer, Cathy Patterson, states, “Gay and straight are one and the same really, and we all have the same goal—or at least we should.”

You can enjoy more materials like this at http://americanarchive.org, under the LGBTQ tab in our browsing catalog.

This post was written by Olivia Hess, AAPB Intern and student at St. Lawrence University.

Launching the American Archive of Public Broadcasting Wiki

The residency period of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) project has now ended, but we’re very proud to launch the final project created by our AAPB NDSR residents: The American Archive of Public Broadcasting Wiki, a technical preservation resource guide for public media organizations.

Selena Chau, Eddy Colloton, Adam Lott, Kate McManus, Lorena Ramírez-López, and Andrew Weaver have highlighted their collaboration and shared their resources, workflows, and documents used for managing audiovisual assets in all their possible formats and environments.  The resulting Wiki encompasses everything from the first stages of the planning process to exit strategies from a storage or database solution.

AAPB staff and the residents hope that this Wiki will be an evolving resource. Editing capabilities will be locked on the Wiki for one week following launch, to allow time for the creation of a web archive of the resource in its original form that the residents may use in their portfolios; after this period, we will open up account creation to the audiovisual archiving and public broadcasting communities. We welcome your participation and contributions!