Library of Congress Releases 2016-2017 Recommended Formats Statement

The Library of Congress has released its latest version of the Library of Congress’ Recommended Formats Statement, including for audio-visual media. These recommendations are useful for organizations that are planning digitization projects or are developing methods to digitally preserve their “born digital” programming.

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The Library of Congress is pleased to announce the release of the 2016-2017 Recommended Formats Statement (http://www.loc.gov/preservation/resources/rfs/).  The proliferation of ways in which works can be created and distributed is a challenge and an opportunity for the Library (and for all institutions and organizations which seek to build collections of creative works) and the Recommended Formats Statement is one way in which the Library seeks to meet the challenge and take full advantage of the opportunity.  By providing guidance in the form of technical characteristics and metadata which best support the preservation and long-term access of digital works (and analog works as well), the Library hopes to encourage creators, vendors, archivists and librarians to use the recommended formats in order to further the creation, acquisition and preservation of creative works which will be available for the use of future generations at the Library of Congress and other cultural memory organizations.

The engagement with the Statement that the Library has seen from others has been extremely heartening.  In response to interest in our work from representatives in the architectural community who see their design work imperiled by insufficient attention to digital preservation, we have updated the Statement to align more closely with developments in this field.  Most importantly of all, we now include websites as a category of its own in the Statement.  Websites are probably the largest field of digital expression available for creators today, yet most creators tend to take a passive role in ensuring the preservation and long-term access of their websites.  By including websites in the Recommended Formats Statement, we hope to encourage website creators to engage more fully in digital preservation, as we aim to do with all the other forms of digital works included in the Statement, by making their websites more preservation-friendly.

The Library remains committed to acquiring and preserving digital works and to providing whatever support it can to other similarly committed stakeholders.  We shall continue to build our collections with their preservation and long-term access firmly in mind; and we shall continue to engage with others in the community in efforts such as the Recommended Formats Statement.  We encourage any and all feedback and comments (http://www.loc.gov/preservation/resources/rfs/contacts.html) others might have on the Statement that might make it more useful for both our needs and for the needs of anyone who might find it worthwhile in their own work.  And we shall continue to engage in an annual review process to ensure that it meets the needs of all stakeholders in the preservation and long-term access of creative works.

Celebrating National Radio Day

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August 20 is National Radio Day!

National Radio Day “is a time to honor one of the most longstanding electronic media and its role in our lives.” To celebrate National Radio Day, we have added more than 500 historic radio programs to the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) Online Reading Room, now accessible from anywhere in the United States. With these new additions, there are now more than 14,000 historic public radio and television programs available for research, educational and informational purposes in the Online Reading Room.

The following radio series are now available for listening online:

Cross Currents from Vermont Public Radio (1978 – 1980)
Cross Currents is a series of recorded lectures and public forums exploring issues of public concern in Vermont.

Hit the Dirt from WERU Community Radio (1990s)
Hit the Dirt is an educational show providing information about a specific aspect of gardening each episode.

Herbal Update from WERU Community Radio (1990s)
Herbal Update is an educational show providing information about the health and nutrition benefits of a specific herb each episode.

The following series were contributed to the AAPB by the University of Maryland’s National Public Broadcasting Archives as part of the National Association of Educational Broadcasters (NAEB) collection. NAEB was established in 1934 from a precursor organization that formed in 1925. In 1951, NAEB established a tape duplication exchange system in Urbana, IL, where programs produced by university radio stations across the country were copied and distributed to member stations, an early networking scheme that influenced the history of later public radio and television systems. The more than 5,500 NAEB radio programs available in the AAPB were produced between 1952 and 1976, and include radio documentaries, coverage of events (hearings, meetings, conferences, and seminars), interviews, debates, and lectures on public affairs topics such as civil rights, foreign affairs, health, politics, education, and broadcasting.

WRVR | Riverside Church
The American People  (1964 – 1965)
Series examines contemporary issues through interviews and personal essays.

Automation and Technological Change (1964)
Documentary series on automation and technological change.

Conversations on Public Relations (1967)
Series of informal half-hour discussions on the nature and ethics of public relations.

WMUK | Western Michigan University
Where Minds Meet (1962 – 1963)
Discussions explore world of speech, conducted by Professors John Freund and Arnold Nelson of Western Michigan University.

WMUB | Miami University
As We See It: Vietnam ‘68 (1968)
Lecture/debate series on aspects of the war in Vietnam and Southeast Asia.

WBFO | SUNY Buffalo
The Only Way to Fly (1968)
Series about the safety aspects of commercial airlines and commercial air transport in the United States.

WUOM | University of Michigan
News in Twentieth Century America (1959)
A series of documentaries on the gathering, writing and dissemination of news in this country today, compiled from interviews with journalists.

Medical Research (1960)
Series about behavioral sciences and medicine.

Behavioral Science Research (1961)
Documentary series on the role of behavioral sciences.

The Challenge of Aging (1961)
Nine segments on aging within the series Behavioral Science Research.

Aspects of Mental Health (1962)
Documentary series about behavioral sciences and medicine research.

Wingspread Conference (1966)
Three programs of the major speeches given at the Wingspread Conference on Educational Radio as a National Resource, held Sept. 26-28, 1966, at Johnson Foundation in Racine, Wisconsin.

The American Town: A Self-Portrait (1967)
Historical documentary series drawn from the recollections of senior citizens in a variety of American towns.

The Truth about Radio (1967)
Interview by Richard Doan with Edmund G. Burrows, chairman of NAEB and manager of WUOM at U. of Michigan. He discusses his station and educational radio and television programming.

Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 (1967)
Panel discussion on Public Broadcasting Act of 1967.

University of Iowa
Russia Revisited (1959)
An informal talk by John Scott, assistant to the publisher of Time, Life and Fortune, recounting his recent trip to the Soviet Union.

Space Science Press Conference (1962)
Press conference at Univ. of Iowa at conclusion of 1962 Space Science Summer Study Program, hosted by National Aeronautic and Space Administration.

University of Florida
Revolution in Latin America (1961)
Documentary series on problems facing Latin America.

University of Denver
Indian Country (1957)
The problems of social adjustment in the attitudes and through the words of the modern American Indian.

Michigan State University
The Tender Twigs (1958)
Discussions of problems affecting today’s youth: mental health, delinquency, crime, social pressures; it considers solutions.

Hold Your Breath (1963)
Series about the impacts of air pollution.

The Music Makers (1965 – 1966)
Distinguished Americans discuss their profession of music, from composition to criticism; the business of music and its current place in our national culture.

San Bernardino Valley College
Politics in the Twentieth Century (1957)
Moderated panel discussion on American political affairs in mid-20th century.

Man is not a Thing (1958)
Discussion of the discoveries and errors of Sigmund Freud and his impact on the American family, politics and religion.

WGUC | University of Cincinnati
Interview with Dr. Albert B. Sabin (1961)
Interview with Dr. Albert B. Sabin, developer of the anti-polio vaccine.

Metaphysical Roots of the Drama (1968)
Lectures given at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion at Cincinnati by Robert Brustein, Dean of the Yale School of Drama.

Access to Historical Records – Archival Projects Webinars Announced

Attention, public media organizations! Check out this upcoming digitization grant opportunity from the National Historical Records and Publications Commission (NHPRC).

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I would like to bring to your attention three upcoming webinars regarding NHPRC’s Access to Historical Records – Archival Projects grant program. The webinar schedule and instructions appear at the end of the message.

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks projects that ensure online public discovery and use of historical records collections. All types of historical records are eligible, including documents, photographs, born-digital records, and analog audio and moving images. Projects may preserve and process historical records to:

– Create new online Finding Aids to collections
– Digitize historical records collections and make them freely available online

The NHPRC encourages organizations to actively engage the public in the work of the project.

A grant normally is for one or two years and for up to $100,000. The Commission expects to make up to 10 grants in this category for a total of up to $700,000. The cost share…

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Kicking off the AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residency

The 2016-2017 AAPB National Digital Stewardship Residencies residencies have now officially kicked off, starting with our AAPB NDSR Immersion Week. From July 25-29, hosts, residents and mentors gathered at WGBH to learn, discuss, and review information about digital preservation and archiving audiovisual materials.

Immersion Week presentations covered a wide array of topics, including the history of public media and the AAPB, an overview of physical and digital audiovisual materials, anintroduction to audiovisual metadata, and instructional seminars on digital preservation workflows, project management, and professional development.  Each of our host mentors also delivered a presentation on the history of their station and their goals for the course of the residency.

On the more technical end of digital preservation, attendees participated a full-day session on “Thinking Like a Computer” and a hands-on command line workshop.

Immersion Week also included visits to MIT’s Digital Sustainability Lab and Northeastern University’s video digitization center, as well as a thorough tour of the WGBH archives, production facilities, and the Media Access Group.

All slides from Immersion Week can be found through the NDSR GitHub account, and several full filmed presentations will be available soon through WGBH Forum Network.

Around the edges of the planned instructional programming, residents still had the energy to check out some of Boston’s famous sites, like the JFK Presidential Library, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and Fanueil Hall.

The hosts and residents have now dispersed to begin their public media preservation projects. Visit our NDSR website for updates from the residents as they document their work throughout the residency, and follow along on the #ndsr hashtag on Twitter!

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Meet Charles Hosale, our new American Archive team member

charles_profileHi! I’m Charles Hosale, and I’m very glad
to be joining the AAPB team as a Special Projects Assistant at WGBH. I come from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where I worked as the AV Project Archivist at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. I’ve also been a Contract Archivist for MillerCoors and Robert W. Baird & Co. I’m really excited to be able to contribute to AAPB because it is a project I’ve been enthusiastic about since it began!

At WGBH I will be working on a few different projects. On the NET Collection Catalog Project, I will be working to create robust catalog records and doing historical research into titles for which little information exists. For the NewsHour Digitization Project, I will be cataloging titles, processing transcripts, working with our vendors to ensure the quality of digitized episodes, and ingesting the files into our digital holdings. I’ll be handling ingestion and quality control for the American Masters Digital Archive Project too. I’ll also be adding some records besides NewsHour and American Masters to the AAPB.

I developed a passion for public media while growing up watching public programing, including the NewsHour and NOVA. I became an archivist so that I could interact with a different story every day, and could help keep those stories safe for the future. I’m grateful today to be able to work on stories that shaped me into the person I am! Even more than that I’m thrilled to increase access to and promote the records so that they can have continued use. Public media programs remain as vital today as when they were produced! Television is an interesting artistic medium to archive because, like I’ve already seen while working on the NET Project, there are some incredible productions that might have only been broadcast once and then put on the shelves, forgotten without any method of continued access. I hope that our work leads to the rediscovery of some compelling stories.

If you’d like to know a bit more about me, I received both an undergraduate in Comparative Literature and an MLIS with an Archives concentration from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. When I’m not working I like to cook (I worked as a line cook during undergrad!) and listen to music. Because I lived in Milwaukee my whole life I’m looking forward to experiencing the East Coast and exploring Boston!

THIRTEEN’s American Masters Celebrates 30th Anniversary with Launch of Digital Video Archive and Podcast

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), a collaboration between WGBH and the Library of Congress, is delighted to preserve for posterity more than 800 previously unreleased full-length interviews that were originally filmed for the iconic documentary PBS series American Masters, produced by New York public television station THIRTEEN for WNET. The interviews, digitized for In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive and the American Masters Podcast, will be archived for long-term storage at the Library of Congress to ensure their survival for future generations.

For 30 years, American Masters has consistently produced high-quality, award-winning documentaries showcasing the pantheon of artistic and cultural figures in American history. This collection will be an amazing addition to the AAPB.

As a central web portal for researchers to discover historic public media content, the AAPB provides information on more than 2.5 million public television and radio programs stored at stations and archives across the nation. Users searching American Masters interviews in the AAPB catalog at americanarchive.org will be directed to the In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive website to view the material.

Read more about this new American Masters project below:

THIRTEEN’s American Masters Celebrates 30th Anniversary with Launch of Digital Video Archive and Podcast at pbs.org/americanmasters

Features previously unreleased interviews with David Bowie, Gloria Steinem, Herbie Hancock, Bernadette Peters, Mike Nichols and others from the series’ award-winning documentary films

(NEW YORK – June 23, 2016) On this day in 1986, THIRTEEN’s American Masters made its series debut on PBS with Private Conversations: On the Set of “Death of a Salesman, a cinéma vérité documentary about the making of Arthur Miller’s masterpiece for network television, and its stars Dustin Hoffman and John Malkovich.

Today, American Masters celebrates its 30th anniversary with the launch of In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive and the American Masters Podcast, featuring previously unreleased interviews filmed for the documentary series: 2,156 tapes, approximately 1,388 digitized hours, 800-plus interviews and counting.

A selection of short-form videos showcasing interviews with David Bowie, Gloria Steinem, Herbie Hancock, Bernadette Peters, Mike Nichols and other luminaries discussing America’s most enduring artistic and cultural giants are available now on the American Masters website (http://pbs.org/americanmasters). New videos will be released on an ongoing basis as the archive is digitized.

The American Masters Podcast, hosted by series executive producer Michael Kantor, will feature long-form interviews from In Their Own Words. The first season, “Women on Women, presents interviews with influential women discussing women cultural icons. Episode one features Gloria Steinem in conversation with the late, multiple Emmy-winning filmmaker Gail Levin taking a critical look at the life and career of Marilyn Monroe from 2006’s American Masters – Marilyn: Still Life. New episodes will be released biweekly on the American Masters website, iTunes, Soundcloud and Stitcher.

All full-length, digitized interviews will be archived by the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), a collaboration between WGBH and the Library of Congress to preserve and make accessible significant historical content created by public media.

“I’m thrilled that the National Endowment for the Arts has provided major funding to get this project off the ground so we can finally share gems from the cutting room floor with the public,” said Michael Kantor, executive producer of American Masters. “Series creator Susan Lacy built a rich library of more than 200 documentary films, which is a treasure trove of American arts, culture and intellect, and the amazing interviews that informed these films are largely unseen. While we are still seeking funds to create a comprehensive, interactive digital archive website, we are confident that In Their Own Words and the American Masters Podcast will inspire and entertain a broad audience both today and in the future.”

Pending funding, the In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive dedicated website will eventually house all full-length, digitized interviews and be a public research-and-learning tool with an emphasis on usability, discoverability and comprehensive indexing to make American Masters interviews easily accessible and available to all.

To further explore the lives and works of masters past and present, the American Masters website currently offers streaming video of select films, outtakes, filmmaker interviews, photos, educational resources and more. American Masters has earned 28 Emmy Awards — including 10 for Outstanding Non-Fiction Series and five for Outstanding Non-Fiction Special — 12 Peabodys, an Oscar, three Grammys, two Producers Guild Awards and many other honors. The series is a production of THIRTEEN PRODUCTIONS LLC for WNET and also seen on the WORLD channel.

In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive and the American Masters Podcast is produced by Joe Skinner. Michael Kantor is executive producer.

Major funding for In Their Own Words: The American Masters Digital Archive is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts. Funding for American Masters is provided by The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Rosalind P. Walter, The Philip and Janice Levin Foundation, Judith and Burton Resnick, The Blanche & Irving Laurie Foundation, Vital Projects Fund, Ellen and James S. Marcus, Lenore Hecht Foundation, Michael & Helen Schaffer Foundation, The André and Elizabeth Kertész Foundation, and public television viewers.

About WNET
WNET is America’s flagship PBS station and parent company of THIRTEEN and WLIW21. WNET also operates NJTV, the statewide public media network in New Jersey. Through its broadcast channels, three cable services (KidsThirteen, Create and World) and online streaming sites, WNET brings quality arts, education and public affairs programming to more than five million viewers each week. WNET produces and presents such acclaimed PBS series as Nature, Great Performances, American Masters, PBS NewsHour Weekend, Charlie Rose and a range of documentaries, children’s programs, and local news and cultural offerings. WNET’s groundbreaking series for children and young adults include Get the Math, Oh Noah! and Cyberchase as well as Mission US, the award-winning interactive history game. WNET highlights the tri-state’s unique culture and diverse communities through NYC-ARTS, Reel 13, NJTV News with Mary Alice Williams and MetroFocus, the daily multi-platform news magazine focusing on the New York region. In addition, WNET produces online-only programming including the award-winning series about gender identity, First Person, and an intergenerational look at tech and pop culture, The Chatterbox with Kevin and Grandma Lill. In 2015, THIRTEEN launched Passport, an online streaming service which allows members to see new and archival THIRTEEN and PBS programming anytime, anywhere: www.thirteen.org/passport.

About the American Archive of Public Broadcasting
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to preserve at-risk public media and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 60 years. To date, over 40,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized. The entire collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and more than 13,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

 

 

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Juno and Peaceful Uses of Space

This post was written by Sadina Shawver, student at Simmons College and intern at the AAPB.

Juno’s recent arrival at the planet Jupiter is just one more stop upon a decades long mission to understand our expanding universe by first understanding our own solar system. In the Spring of 1962, Seattle, Washington’s World’s Fair hosted a conference on space research. Experts from varied and interdisciplinary sciences were present to discuss the achievements of NASA in their time and the scientific and fiscal future of space exploration. The University of Maryland has provided a 13 part series containing highlights on the 2nd National Conference on Peaceful Uses of Space, which you can listen to in the AAPB Online Reading Room!

General Chairman William P. Woods started off the conference by paralleling the potential impact of 20th century space research to that of the original Age of Exploration of the 15th century. Seattle Governor Albert Rosellini then stressed the need to strengthen a partnership between the scientists undertaking space research, the politicians providing fiscal support, and the laymen whose taxes ultimately funded such missions. As Chairman of the Commerce Committee, a member of both the Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences and the Senate Appropriations Committee, Washington Senator Warren Magnuson placed his weighted support into the future of space research.

A queue of scientists followed the opening speakers with lists of accomplishments, theories, and future missions to present to the conference. Homer E. Newell, the Director of NASA’s Offices of Space Sciences, advocated a strong national space program as a means to take up a position as world leaders in the space sciences. The Offices of Space Sciences Deputy Director, Edgar M. Cartwright, reminded the conference that the contemporary understanding of our own solar system was but a drop in the potential well of knowledge.

Milton B. Ames, Jr., Director of Space Vehicles for NASA’s Offices of Advanced Research and Technology, and Harold Finger, Director of Nuclear Systems in the Offices of Advanced Research and Technology as well as the Manager of the Joint Atomic Energy Committee in NASA’s Space Nuclear Propulsion Office, spoke of furthering scientific understanding in vehicular space travel as a means of preparing for long-distance human exploration.

Over the length of the series, scientists and advocates continued to present to the attendees of the Conference a plethora of potential social and economic benefits to furthering space exploration. Juno’s mission continues this tradition of peaceful and scientific space exploration.

6B63E2FE-810C-43C9-8C47-B104CE49A51FSadina Shawver is a graduate student at Simmons SLIS and a cataloging intern at the American Archive of Public Broadcasting.

AAPB honored with CLIR DLF Community/Capacity Award!

Today the Council on Library and Information ResourcesDigital Library Federation (DLF) announced that the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) has been selected as an inaugural recipient of the DLF Community/Capacity Award, along with co-recipient The Biodiversity Heritage Library! Voting for the award ran through the month of June, and members selected AAPB among 16 nominees.

About the DLF Community/Capacity Awards:

“Unlike many honors in technology-related fields, DLF Comm/Cap Awards recognize collective action over individual achievement, socially-responsible creativity over pure innovation, and acts of care, maintenance, thoughtful growth, and repair over the tools and practices of disruption. They honor constructive, community-minded capacity-building in digital libraries, archives, and museums: efforts that contribute to our ability to collaborate across institutional lines and work toward larger goals and a better future, together.

Most of all, they’re about inspiration. This year’s 16 inspiring nominees spanned disciplines and fields. They included projects of greatly varied longevity and size, expert teams and community organizers, and people making deeply valued contributions to DLF practitioner communities and the publics and missions driving them.”

AAPB will be honored in an award ceremony at the 2016 DLF Forum, taking place this November in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

More about the award is available here: https://www.diglib.org/archives/12231/

We could not have received this award without the many contributions and support from our content contributors at stations and archives across the United States and territories. Together, we are fulfilling a shared vision, first embodied in the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, to create a national library and archives of significant public television and radio content. Together, we are preserving this content for posterity and ensuring its access for researchers today and well into the future.

Finally, our thanks go to the DLF, CLIR and to the broader DLF community and membership for voting for AAPB as the recipient of the award! We are incredibly honored!

About the AAPB, The Biodiversity Heritage Library, and the Digital Library Federation:

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting 
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting, led by WGBH and the Library of Congress, has coordinated a national effort to preserve and make accessible significant historical content created by public media and are preserving at-risk public broadcasting before its content is lost to posterity. To date, more than 40,000 hours of content contributed by more than 100 organizations across the country have been digitized. The entire collection is accessible on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress. Together, WGBH, the Library, and participating organizations have made more than 13,500 programs available online for research, educational and informational purposes, becoming a focal point for discoverability of historical public media content. Learn more.

The Biodiversity Heritage Library 
An international consortium of over two dozen organizations, the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) stands out not only in service to its partners, but also in its collaborative approach to making open access, often rare and unique biodiversity content available to 120,000+ monthly users worldwide. A signatory of the Bouchout Declaration, BHL’s commitment to open access extends beyond placing scanned pages on its website. Content is available via Internet Archive, Digital Public Library of America, and Europeana; over 100,000 scientific illustrations via Flickr; and BHL’s suite of APIs brings data directly to users. To build capacity among partners, BHL also provides intensive digitization workshops, reaching participants from across Sub-Saharan Africa, Mexico, the U.S., and beyond, and supporting participation by institutions large and small. Learn more.

Digital Library Federation
The Digital Library Federation is a robust and diverse community of practitioners who advance research, learning, and the public good through the creative design and wise application of digital library technologies. DLF serves as a resource and catalyst for collaboration among its institutional members, and all who are invested in the success of libraries, museums, and archives in the digital age. DLF serves its parent organization, the Council on Library and Information Resources, as the place where CLIR’s broader information-community strategies are informed and enriched by digital library practice. DLF connects CLIR’s vision and research agenda with our active practitioner network, and brings the insights of the DLF community to bear. In addition, we partner closely on key CLIR initiatives related to DLF’s mission, in order to provide advice and expertise to CLIR from the digital library community, as well as connections and opportunities for our members. DLF currently includes 151 institutional members. Learn more.

Police relations in public media

Our hearts are with those who are grieving unnecessary loss of life today.

The following primary source materials from public media stations around the country document some of the history of the complex dynamic between police forces and marginalized communities in the United States.

“Seeds of Discontent”
Detroit, Michigan, 1968
Part of a WDET series discussing issues affecting the black community, these programs focus on the police, riots, and red-light districts.
http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_500-r49g8r7h
http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_500-639k7c6m

“Transsexuals and the Police”
San Francisco, CA, 1968
Three trans members of the organization Conversion Our Goal discuss police relations with a Community Relations Officer of the SFPD, in a panel moderated by the San Francisco Bail Project.
http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_28-g44hm52x2x

“Conference on racism in the law”
San Francisco, CA, 1968
Nine Bay Area legal organizations sponsored a conference on ‘Racism in the law’ on May 4, 1968; this is the concluding session of the conference.
http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_28-5717m04819

“Police fire on Black Panther headquarters”
Oakland, CA, 1968
KPFA reports on the police attack on the Black Panther Party headquarters in Oakland on September 10, 1968, including interviews with several major figures in the Black Panther movement.
http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_28-n58cf9jn53

“The Death of George Jackson”
Berkeley, CA, 1971
News story from KPFA on the death of Black Panther George Jackson, killed in a prison escape. The recording also contains a story on disturbances in Camden, New Jersey, following the police beating and subsequent death of Rafael Rodriguez Gonzalez.
http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_28-vd6nz8168s

“Interviews with Tactical Patrol Force officers”
Boston, MA, 1975
Members of the Tactical Patrol Force answer questions about their role and respond to charges of police violence.
http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_15-9bk16p6h

“Steps of Force” (in Front Street Weekly)
Portland, OR, 1985
An episode of a regular Oregon Public Broadcasting news magazine  discusses the ongoing issue of police brutality.
http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_153-009w0wcr

NOW celebrates its 50th anniversary!

This post was written by Andrea Hetley, student at Simmons College and intern at the AAPB.

June 30th, 2016 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Organization for Women (NOW) at the Third National Conference of Commissions on the Status of Women. Betty Friedan, one of the founders and the first president of NOW, wrote the name of the organization and its original statement of purpose on a paper napkin during a meeting in her hotel room, creating an organization that would have a profound influence on the second wave feminist movement. The 28 founding members of NOW were inspired to create this organization out of frustration with the failure of the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC) to enforce Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Title VII prohibited discrimination in employment discrimination on the basis of sex, and the EEOC was formed in 1965 to implement it. However, despite the efforts of commissioners Aileen Hernandez and Richard Graham (both of whom became leader in NOW), the commission voted 3-2 that it was permissible for job advertisements to be segregated by sex. This practice was a significant source of employment discrimination, as it allowed employers to advertise different types of work for men and women. An example of a sex segregated help wanted section can be found here. Note the types of jobs available to men: supervisor, manager, engineer, superintendent, and pharmacist, to name a few. Now note the types of jobs available to women: waitress, bookkeeper, assistant, machine operator, and Office “Gal Friday” are a few examples. The jobs available to women tended to be for positions of a more menial sort, and at lower pay rate. After this decision, Dr. Pauli Murray denounced the EEOC’s decision to continue to allow sex segregated job advertising. Betty Friedan contacted Dr. Murray in support of her position.

In June 1966, hundreds of representatives (including Friedan and Murray) gathered at The Third National Conference of Commissions on the Status of Women, whose theme was “Targets for Action.” Many delegates present had a specific action in mind: the passage of a resolution demanding that the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC) fulfill its legal mandate to put an end to sex discrimination in employment. Representatives were told that they had no authority to accomplish this goal, and that they could not even pass a resolution.

Despite this setback, they were determined to put the theme of the conference into action. 15-20 women assembled in Friedan’s hotel room, wrote a draft statement of purpose, and discussed the best way to move forward. By the end of the conference, 28 women had joined creating a new civil rights organization “to take action to bring women into full participation in the mainstream of American society now, assuming all the privileges and responsibilities thereof in truly equal partnership with men.”[i] By October 1966, when NOW held its organizing conference in Washington DC, 300 men and women had become charter members.

Karen DeCrow

NOW went on to work on many important causes, many of which are discussed by Karen DeCrow in this 1974 appearance on the talk show “Woman.” She discusses NOW’s achievements and their goals for political, economic, and social change.

This video, along with many others, will be part of a curated exhibit on women in public media, coming soon to the AAPB website!

Andrea Hetley Profile PictureAndrea Hetley is a graduate student at Simmons SLIS, and an exhibitions intern at the American Archive of Public Broadcasting.

[i] http://now.org/about/history/founding-2/