Celebrate Women’s History Month by Preserving Women’s Voices in Public Media

Update! as of 9/14/18 – Want to help preserve women’s voices and continue to preserve WNED’s collection? The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) invites the public to participate in the “Transcribe to Digitize Challenge”, a preservation challenge hosted by George Blood LP, a digitization service provider, for the participating stations of the AAPB. If WNED completes 20+ of their transcripts in FIX IT+ within a year, George Blood LP will digitize (for free!) 20+ items from WNED’s vault. Let’s go! http://fixitplus.americanarchive.org/?collection_id=54

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One of the most fascinating aspects of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is discovering how local broadcasting stations used their platforms to communicate national issues to local audiences.

As second-wave feminism gained momentum between the years 1960 to 1980, WNED from Buffalo, New York documented the movement’s ripple effect in a half-hour public affairs talk show series titled Woman.  Syndicated by over 200 PBS stations during the years 1973-1977, Woman was the only year-round, national public television forum where a wide variety of national experts provided perspectives on the (then) evolving world of women’s history.

To celebrate this milestone in women’s public media history, the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) launched a new Special Collection featuring the Woman series! Over 190 episodes are available online via the AAPB website: http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/woman-series.

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Woman Series, WNED – Buffalo, NY (1973-1977)

The AAPB invites you to celebrate Women’s History Month by helping preserve and make accessible six Woman transcripts. We’re launching a demo-version of our *NEW* transcript editor tool FIX IT+, a line-by-line editing platform initially developed by the New York Public Library. The six featured interviews include conversations with Gloria Steinem (editor and co-founder of Ms. Magazine), Dorothy Pitman Hughes (African American activist and co-founder of Ms. Magazine), Betty Friedan (author of The Feminine Mystique), Nora Ephron (editor for Esquire magazine and the author of the best-selling book Crazy Salad), Marcia Ann Gillespie (editor-in-chief of Essence Magazine and a board member of Essence communications), Connie Uri, M.D. (on the National Board of Research on the Plutonium Economy and the advisory board of NASC, the Native American Solidarity Committee), and Marie Sanchez (Chief Judge of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, member of the Indian Women United for Social Justice).

These transcripts will be made available online through the AAPB’s website, allowing women’s voices in public media to be more readily searchable and accessible for future generations.

Below are sample recordings of the six interviews mentioned above. Search the Woman Special Collection for more interviews with activists, journalists, writers, scholars, lawyers, artists, psychologists, and doctors, covering topics such as women in sports, the Equal Rights Amendment, sexuality, marriage, women’s health, divorce, the Women’s Liberation Movement, motherhood, and ageism, among others.

Direct link to FIX IT+: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/

Sample Recordings of Featured Transcripts:

 

 

Connie Uri, M.D. and Marie Sanchez, Chief Judge of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/transcripts/cpb-aacip_81-67wm3fxh

 

 

Marcia Ann Gillespie, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/transcripts/cpb-aacip_81-69z08t6x

 

 

Nora Ephron, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_81-988gttr0

 

 

Gloria Steinem, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_81-57np5qgv

 

 

Betty Friedan, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_81-9995xhm0

 

 

Dorothy Pitman Hughes, FIX IT+ Transcript: http://54.205.165.195.xip.io/transcripts/cpb-aacip_81-59c5b5nr

Written by Ryn Marchese, AAPB Engagement and Use Manager, 3/07/18

Ben Gogel, Research Assistant on the NewsHour Digitization Project

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Over the last several months, I’ve worked as a Research Assistant at WGBH on the PBS NewsHour Digitization Project. This project involves taking the predecessor programs for the PBS NewsHour, including The MacNeil/Lehrer Report, The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour and The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, and making them available to a wider audience through digitization, preservation, and online access. My specific responsibilities include reviewing the proxy files, or digital copies, of multiple NewsHour episodes and making sure they are presentable (no major audiovisual glitches, complete transcripts, subtitles are legible), and recording the information in an online spreadsheet. This may sound like a straightforward job, but working at WGBH taught me even straightforward jobs can have unpredictable aspects, and I learned a lot about adapting to new challenges and going outside my comfort zone.

Before working on this project, I attended a rigorous Archives Management program at Simmons University, learning about several archival processing practices, chief among them being More Product, Less Process (MPLP). The idea behind MPLP is that, in cases where large amounts of archival content needs to be preserved, the Archivist must focus on processing as many objects as possible. This approach served me well in several real-world internships, including two in different departments at WGBH. The first of these was in the Creative department during the summer of 2015, helping my co-workers not only track data but set up a Google Drive account so as to store it in a spreadsheet. I then parlayed this experience into my Simmons Archives Field Study capstone project in the WGBH Media Library and Archives (MLA). Throughout the winter of 2016, I reviewed and cataloged episodes of regional news magazines produced by the Wyoming PBS and Oregon Public Broadcasting. Between the academic training and real-world experience, I thought I could handle working on the NewsHour Digitization Project, but over time, I found out just how unprepared I was, in the best way possible.

While archives share general principles, every place and department I’ve worked at has its own unique, unpredictable challenges, and the same was true on this project as well. A typical day on the job involves watching NewsHour episodes in bits and pieces, making sure the videos were watchable and their accompanying materials (i.e. transcripts and subtitles) were present and accurate. Most of the time, review has been straightforward, and the clips themselves have occasionally been interesting looks at iconic figures from new perspectives: personal favorites include retrospectives on what would’ve been the 100th birthdays of Alfred Hitchcock and Walt Disney, for example. But there are times where I have been thrown for a loop and needed to adapt.

For clips without transcripts and/or subtitles, I had no choice but to watch them for longer time periods, paying close attention to the audio. This need for paying close attention goes both ways, and there were times during graphic reports (like 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina coverage) where I needed to take small breaks to keep from getting overwhelmed emotionally. Fortunately, my co-workers and supervisor, remembering me from my previous Archives internship, have been remarkably sympathetic and understanding, which helped alleviate this stress, among other worries. The friendly, open atmosphere also encouraged me to branch out and extend a helping hand to them, and new people at WGBH, in kind.

Throughout the summer months, the MLA had several interns join over the summer, and as a welcoming gesture, I sat down with each of them for lunch on their first days, and over the course of their time I offered practical advice whenever I could, most importantly to not rule anything out vis-à-vis future work opportunities. At the same time, I myself was a fresh addition to the audience at several MeetUps and SpeakEasys: one of each a month for promoting and socializing with people from different departments of WGBH. The MeetUps even have a whole minute set aside for the purpose of introducing yourself to strangers, a nice and well-appreciated touch. Between this mentorship and more socially conducive environment, I had a support network that helped me a great deal.

As a kid, two of the biggest things that scared me were thunderstorms and spicy foods, particularly buffalo chicken. I would always stay away from both of them at every possible opportunity, to preserve my anxiety and avoid any kind of discomfort. The last few months had their fair share of stormy heat waves and spicy hot wings, but as with archival work in general, uncomfortable situations can only be avoided for so long. In the end, I had to buck up and accept that summer storms could at least be tolerated, and it helps that my co-workers never treated it as a debilitating setback. As for the spicy foods, that I did have control over, and to set a positive example for the interns, I not only tried buffalo chicken, but also pulled pork covered in Jamaican jerk seasoning. To my surprise, neither one of those foods burned my mouth off or led to searing pain, and this growth can be directly attributed to both my at-work support group and my need/willingness to handle unforeseen archiving circumstances.

Being adaptable to unpredictable elements is the most valuable lesson I learned from this experience. On-the-nose food metaphors aside, my experience with the turbulence in both the clouds and video files forced me out of my comfort zone, but it was all in terms I could understand thanks to my years of real-world experience. In my goal of preserving and making accessible the NewsHour files, I persevered and made myself more accessible as well.

Written by Ben Gogel, https://www.linkedin.com/in/bengogel/

 

 

Riley Griffin, Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellow at GPB

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When we toured WGBH, we took turns holding an Emmy Award trophy (Image: Riley Griffin, author, holding an Emmy Award)

Hi, everyone!  My name is Riley Griffin (xe/xir).  I am just now entering my second year of graduate school in Clayton State University’s Masters of Archival Studies program.  I am the second fellow, after Virginia Angles, to be a part of the American Archives of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF).  My part of the project focused on digitizing Georgia Public Broadcasting’s (GPB) Georgia Gazette under the incredibly trusting supervision of Ellen Reinhardt, Kathy Christensen, and Joshua Kitchens.  I was looking for summer opportunities when a chance at following a career path in my new-found love for preservation presented itself through the AAPBPBPF.  I was overjoyed by the scope of the fellowship, the organizations working with it, and the special collections it included.

Every fellowship starts with certain expectations only to end with different lessons and new perspectives.  At the start of my fellowship, I spent a lot of time comparing. There were a lot of things I was not expecting, my reactions being one of them.  As we visited Boston and learned about all the different types of digital media we could be working with I couldn’t help but begin to feel this sort of jealousy–wishing I could work with as many formats and topics as possible.

Of course, this hunger decreased to a low rumble as I became humbled by the Georgia Gazette materials.  I quickly realized I craved difficulty; so, I became grateful instead of jealous.  In training, we were prepared to scrub and scrub our machines clean, take precious time delicately fixing things, and balance everything to be just perfect.  However, my project was given a bit of grace by being a more modern collection. Digital Audio Tapes (DATs) are often considered one of the most fragile media formats. However, most of them were recorded at a decent quality from the 1990’s to the 2000’s, rewound to the beginning, and left alone and undisturbed in an air-conditioned radio station.  So, please forgive me when I am grateful that the worst of my worries is how many times I dropped the (very loose) pinch roller into the machine that day.

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GPB Digitization Station (Image: Two desks with 2 computers, a DAT machine, cleaning materials, and various electronics everywhere)

The topics of everyone’s materials had me curious, too.  I was wondering what it was like to have video–as my project was only audio–and to have materials like oral histories to work with.  I quickly counted my blessings as I heard what my colleague was working on–images of war, tragedy, death, and disaster. I thanked GPB for having forward attitudes towards topics, reporters who were nearly-emotionless in comparison, and pert news reports.  I am a very sensitive soul and could imagine having to wait the tears out before being able to see what you’re working on. I also realized I was having a hard time with some of the Georgia Gazette material.  One thing I experience as an archivist who moves all over is major culture shock.  I think being an archivist is one of the best ways to learn about the place you have just moved to. But it also exposes you to things much quicker than you expect.

I’m from upstate New York, which has a different demographic and historical context; although I’m not unfamiliar with racism, being deeply embedded in Georgia’s racial history as I digitized GPB’s daily news was a new experience for me. I had moments of weeping at work as I listened to news reports about the Georgia General Assembly holding expensive special sessions in order to redistrict purely based on race, schoolchildren being prevented from going the schools they want as a result of segregation, and segregation’s long-term effects on Georgia school districts, which I still hear about today. Although I knew about these issues in the abstract, hearing them firsthand was very emotional for me and adding visuals might have been overwhelming.

I would be lying if I were to say I came away from this project without any further attachment to Georgia.  Although it has exposed me to some of the ugly parts I try to avoid in my daily life, it has also exposed me to so much more.  Even the drive to work showed me the oldest drive-in movie theater in the area that is still working.   I also got the opportunity to listen to all of the preparation and execution of the 1996 Olympics.  I am a huge fan of all things Olympics, so

DAT
Indeed, this was the “WORST Gazette ever” (Image: close-up of a DAT labelled “Maxell DAT; Gazette 01-20 95; WORST Gazette ever”)

this was a special treat for me. The Georgia Gazette has given me a sort of pseudo-pride of Georgia; every guest and topic on the show had a relation to Georgia.  Learning about popular historical figures like Blind Tom Wiggins or popular events like the National Grits Festival in Warwick gives me a great appreciation for where I live and the opportunities available to me here.  It has also given me a deeper and fuller appreciation for public broadcasting, something that had already been instilled in me.  In a time where everyone is flocking to Georgia for jobs, often displacing long-term Georgians, I remind myself that my brief time being here must be purposeful.  I hope to help make their history more accessible so that they can feel that true sense of pride they deserve.  With the Georgia Gazette, I hope I did just that–even if it was just a little bit.

 

Written by Riley Griffin, PBPF Summer 2018 Cohort

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About PBPF

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, supports ten graduate student fellows at University of North Carolina, San Jose State University, Clayton State University, University of Missouri, and University of Oklahoma in digitizing at-risk materials at public media organizations around the country. Host sites include the Center for Asian American Media, Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, and KOPN Community Radio. Contents digitized by the fellows will be preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The grant also supports participating universities in developing long-term programs around audiovisual preservation and ongoing partnerships with their local public media stations.

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work.

American Archive of Public Broadcasting’s Advisory Committees to Guide Public Media Preservation

Education Advisory Committee, Scholar Advisory Committee and Stations and Producers Advisory Committee to Guide American Archive of Public Broadcasting’s Preservation Efforts

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) has announced three new advisory committees: The Education Advisory Committee (EduAC), the Scholar Advisory Committee (SAC) and the Stations and Producers Advisory Committee (SPAC). These three groups of public media advocates and experts in their fields will grow the AAPB’s reach and engagement and will provide feedback on how to improve the AAPB’s operations as relates to each group’s unique needs. This initiative is made possible with funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The AAPB, a collaboration between Boston public media station WGBH and the Library of Congress, has been working to digitize and preserve more than 50,000 hours of broadcasts and previously inaccessible programs from public radio and public television’s more than 70-year legacy. A list of Committee members is available at http://americanarchive.org/about-the-american-archive/advisory-committees.

 “The AAPB is a vast resource and a unique catalogue of our nation’s history through the lens of public media and local perspectives. The feedback we receive from our new committees is crucial to making the AAPB as accessible and user-friendly as possible to key communities across the country,” said Karen Cariani, David O. Ives Executive Director of the WGBH Media Library and Archives and WGBH’s Project Director for the AAPB. “We look forward to collaborating with scholars, educators, stations and producers and expanding the reach of the AAPB.”

The SAC, comprised of scholars from universities, academic and cultural institutions and non-profits from across the U.S., will collaborate on developing ways to engage with scholars and students, discuss how the AAPB can better support research, provide feedback on the AAPB’s website usability and accessibility, advise on future collections significant for preservation and assist in outreach across their academic networks. SAC scholars represent expertise in a range of fields, including public history, media, cinema, library and information science, journalism, science and American studies. The AAPB’s audio and video content from public media stations is a rich resource for research across these topics and more. The SAC’s input will help the AAPB make the use of these resources more accessible for researchers.

A group of education professionals comprise the EduAC. This committee will help the AAPB assess how it can better grow the usage of public media materials in k-12 and community college classrooms. EduAC will advise the AAPB on how to build better and/or integrate with existing online educational tools, to engage with k-12 students and better support educators in the field, and will act as advocates for public media preservation in their networks and communities.

The SPAC will bring together members of the public media community to gather input on how the AAPB can help stations preserve public media and make their historic content more accessible. The SPAC will offer feedback on the archiving services most needed by public media stations and identify significant collections and content for preservation.

The AAPB is a national effort to preserve at-risk public media and provide a central web portal for access to the programming that public stations and producers have created over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized, and the Archive aims to grow by up to 25,000 additional hours per year. The entire collection is available for research on location at WGBH and the Library, and currently more than 30,000 programs are available in the AAPB’s Online Reading Room at americanarchive.org to anyone in the United States.

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About the American Archive of Public Broadcasting

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress, and more than 30,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

About WGBH

WGBH Boston is America’s preeminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the Web, including Frontline, Nova, American Experience, Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Arthur, and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle, and children’s series. WGBH also is a major supplier of programming for public radio and a partner with Public Radio International (PRI). As a leader in educational multimedia for the classroom, WGBH supplies content to PBS LearningMedia, a national broadband service for teachers and students. WGBH also is a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to those with hearing or visual impairments. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards and Oscars. Find more information at www.wgbh.org.

About the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States – and extensive materials from around the world – both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

About The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Founded in 1969, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation endeavors to strengthen, promote, and, where necessary, defend the contributions of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse and democratic societies by supporting exemplary institutions of higher education and culture as they renew and provide access to an invaluable heritage of ambitious, path-breaking work. Additional information is available at mellon.org.

Laura Haygood, Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellow at OETA

Hi, I’m Laura Haygood, a Masters of Library and Information Studies student at the University of Oklahoma (OU). I am part of the second cohort of Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellows. I was very fortunate to step into this position with a working digitization station in place. Many thanks go to Evelyn Cox, the previous fellow, for her work setting up the digitization station at Oklahoma Educational Television Authority (OETA).

My Team
I am pleased to say that I have a wonderful team to work with here in Oklahoma. My faculty advisor, Dr. Susan Burke, has provided me with advice and stayed active in and engaged with the project. The OU SLIS staff have been a wonderful support; they have encouraged me and been persistent in pursuing all of our equipment. I could not have done this without Lisa Henry, my local mentor and technical advisor here at OU. Lisa would dash over every time there was a problem with the equipment, willing to troubleshoot solutions with me. Finally, my host station mentor, Janette Thornbrue, has been a terrific guide on my journey through this project, making me feel welcome at OETA and gladly answering all of my questions.

Team
The Oklahoma Univerity Team, from left to right: Lisa Henry, Laura Haygood, and Dr. Susan Burke

Overcoming Technical Troubles

While I was able to come into this position with a working digitization station, that does not mean I didn’t face a fair amount of technical troubles. Much of the equipment used by the first fellow was borrowed for the duration of the fellowship, so I needed to order and set up equipment for our permanent station. While the training we received from Immersion Week was helpful, Lisa Henry and I had a lot to figure out to order new and replacement equipment. In addition to purchasing equipment, we also had to discern what cables were needed to connect all of the equipment. We managed to get the new equipment set up during week 6 of the 9-week fellowship. It took us several hours, a fair amount of frustration, and a bit of improvisation, but we succeeded! Here is a breakdown of the equipment used by each cohort of the fellowship:

First Cohort equipment:                

Sony Betacam deck

Panasonic DVCpro deck

Yamaha audio mixer (borrowed)

Blackmagic Intensity Shuttle

Horita Color Sync Generator (borrowed)

MacBook Pro

Second Cohort equipment:

Sony Betacam deck

Panasonic DVCpro deck

Mackie Audio mixer (replaced)

Blackmagic Design UltraStudio Express

(new purchase)

Horita Color Sync Generator (replaced)

Horita Black Burst Generator (new

purchase)

Leitch analog TBC (new purchase)

MacBook Pro

DigStation
Oklahoma University Digitization Station

Materials

I have lived in Oklahoma for most of my life, so I was familiar with a lot of the material I digitized. There were definitely some hidden gems, though. As a child, I loved reading the Weekly Reader in school, and through this project I learned that Weekly Reader was created by an Oklahoma teacher, Eleanor Johnson. In addition to Oklahoma’s history, I vividly recall my personal experience with two of the events that I digitized, the Oklahoma City Bombing and the 2013 EF-5 tornado that hit Moore, OK. These tapes were heartbreaking to digitize, but uplifting as well, as I got to view the “Oklahoma Strong” disposition of Oklahomans. As a state, we band together to support and assist communities in need.

My biggest takeaway from this project is that you need a variety of sources to assist you when trying to blend 4 decades of equipment into a cohesive unit. In addition to my advisors, I received invaluable assistance from Gary Bates, our IT Specialist, and Jackie Jay of Bay Area Video Coalition. Jackie trained me on this equipment and graciously responded to countless emails from me as I ordered and set up our new equipment.

Written by Laura Haygood, PBPF Summer 2018 Cohort

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About PBPF

The Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, supports ten graduate student fellows at University of North Carolina, San Jose State University, Clayton State University, University of Missouri, and University of Oklahoma in digitizing at-risk materials at public media organizations around the country. Host sites include the Center for Asian American Media, Georgia Public Broadcasting, WUNC, the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, and KOPN Community Radio. Contents digitized by the fellows will be preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The grant also supports participating universities in developing long-term programs around audiovisual preservation and ongoing partnerships with their local public media stations.

For more updates on the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship project, follow the project at pbpf.americanarchive.org and on Twitter at #aapbpf, and come back in a few months to check out the results of their work.

AAPB Welcomes Six New Executive Advisory Council Members

Judy Woodruff, Bill Siemering, Lloyd Morrisett, Mary Minow, Jennifer Lawson and Edward Ayers Join Seven Others to Inform and Guide the AAPB

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), is pleased to announce the addition of six new members to the AAPB Executive Advisory Council, a distinguished group of 13 individuals that informs and guides the strategic direction of the AAPB to ensure that the Archive continues to serve the needs of public media stakeholders and the American people. The AAPB, a collaboration between Boston public media station WGBH and the Library of Congress, has been working to digitize and preserve more than 50,000 hours of broadcasts and previously inaccessible programs from public radio and public television’s more than 70-year legacy.

New Executive Advisory Council Members

image001Edward Ayers
Ayers is the Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities and president emeritus at the University of Richmond and co-host of BackStory with the American History Guys, a nationally syndicated radio show and podcast, Ayers was awarded the presidential National Humanities Medal in July 2013 as historian of the American South and pioneer in digital history. He won the Bancroft Prize and Beveridge Prize in American history and has collaborated on major digital history projects including the Valley of the Shadow, American Panorama, and Bunk.

image002Jennifer Lawson – Vice Chair
Lawson is a media consultant based in Washington, D.C. A former executive vice president of Programming and Promotion Services at PBS, in 2016 Lawson received the Ralph Lowell Award, public television’s highest honor. Lawson has also received lifetime achievement awards from American Public Television and the Public Television Programmers’ Association. Lawson was senior vice president for Television and Digital Content at the CPB and served as vice chair of the PBS Board, Chair of the American Public Television and as a member of the Advisory Board of Washington Women in Film and Video.

image003Mary Minow
Minow is a Presidential Appointee to the National Museum and Library Services Board at the Institute of Museum and Library Services and a Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. Minow serves as a Board Member of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), consultant to the American Library Association, and is an attorney, consultant, and a former librarian.

image004Lloyd Morrisett
Morrisett served as President of The John and Mary R. Markle Foundation where he initiated the Foundation’s program in communications and information technology. Previously, Morrisett was Vice President of the Carnegie Corporation of New York and of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching where he worked to start the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). He was co-creator of the Sesame Workshop and is a trustee and chairman emeritus of the Sesame Workshop.

image005Bill Siemering
Siemering was a member of the founding board of directors for NPR and the author of its original mission statement. As NPR’s first director of programming, Siemering led the development of All Things Considered and developed Fresh Air into a national program. The recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, Siemering worked with the Open Society Foundation in Eastern Europe, Africa and Mongolia before founding Developing Radio Partners to enrich the programming of local stations in Africa. He received a Lifetime Achievement Award from NPR and currently serves as Senior Fellow at the Wyncote Foundation.

image006Judy Woodruff – Chair
Woodruff is Anchor and Managing Editor of the PBS NewsHour. She’s covered politics and news for more than four decades, serving as anchor and senior correspondent for CNN, as the chief Washington Correspondent for The MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour, anchor at the PBS’s award-winning documentary series “Frontline with Judy Woodruff” and as White House correspondent at NBC. Woodruff is a founding co-chair of the International Women’s Media Foundation, an organization dedicated to promoting and encouraging women in communication industries worldwide. She is the recent recipient of the Cine Lifetime Achievement award, the Edward R. Murrow Lifetime Achievement Award in Broadcast Journalism/Television, the University of Southern California Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Journalism, and many other awards.

The Executive Advisory Council provides strategic guidance to the AAPB project team and raises awareness of the collection. Council members serve for three years. The newest members of the Council were inducted in February, 2018. Award-winning journalist, author and EAC member Cokie Roberts was recently appointed as Vice Chair. A full list of the members of the Executive Advisory Council can be found at http://americanarchive.org/about-the-american-archive/executive-advisory-council.

The AAPB is a national effort to preserve at-risk public media and provide a central web portal for access to the programming that public stations and producers have created over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized, and the Archive aims to grow by up to 25,000 additional hours per year. The entire collection is available for research on location at WGBH and the Library, and currently more than 30,000 programs are available in the AAPB’s Online Reading Room at americanarchive.org to anyone in the United States.

Federal Grant Awarded to Preserve and Provide Access to Local Public Broadcasts including Peabody Nominated Programs

“Each program was submitted to the Peabody Awards by its creators as an exemplar of their finest work. These materials were made for the benefit of the American public, but the American public has not had access to them,” said Ruta Abolins, BMA director.

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Some 4,000 hours of programming produced by public radio and television stations between 1941 and 1999 will be digitized and made available to the public, thanks to a federal grant for the Brown Media Archives (BMA) at the University of Georgia Libraries. The programming was originally submitted for consideration for Peabody Awards.

The BMA and the WGBH Educational Foundation on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting will partner to utilize the $216,280 grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission to preserve and provide access to the programs, all of which were submitted to the George Foster Peabody Awards. By adding the programs to the AAPB, this project will ensure that preservation copies are maintained at the Library of Congress for posterity and will expand access via the AAPB’s public website and on-site research locations. Current access to this collection of materials is only available onsite at BMA.

“Each program was submitted to the Peabody Awards by its creators as an exemplar of their finest work. These materials were made for the benefit of the American public, but the American public has not had access to them,” said Ruta Abolins, BMA director. “This project rectifies that situation. By preserving and providing access to these programs, we ensure that the original investment of public money in the creation of these programs pays off by extending the value of the work.”

In addition to the Special Collections Libraries, AAPB staff will work with the Peabody Media Center to curate two online exhibits focused on topics or events of historical significance that showcase the Peabody Awards Collection alongside local and national news, public affairs, and cultural programming contributed by other AAPB participating organizations. The Peabody Media Center will also present a series of public screenings of Peabody Awards Collection programs digitized through this project.

“This programming is unique, not only for its rarity, but because it derives from what local and public programming producers deemed their ‘best’ work,” said Jeffrey P. Jones, Peabody Awards executive director. “While the Peabody Award itself is well-known, the wealth of these programs considered for the award has largely been forgotten. Such materials hold the potential to reshape our understanding of television history and American culture. Most scholarship on broadcast history has focused on network programming, which is better known and easier to access.”

This collection contains programs created by over 230 different radio and television stations in forty-six states plus Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. One hundred seventy three of the included programs are Peabody winners.

“As a collection, this group of titles presents an unparalleled archive of public broadcasting diversity and excellence, not accessible elsewhere. By expanding public access to this collection, we will broaden understanding of our collective past. The collection also will be an important source for the study of public media,” said Mary Miller, Peabody Awards archivist.

The breadth and depth of the materials selected for preservation under this project will create opportunities to explore diverse topics and also allow researchers to deeply examine given topics from a variety of perspectives. Even the oldest programs contain content of current relevance; even the regionally-focused productions have national value. For example, Connecticut Public Radio’s “One on One” series (a 1986 winner) sought “to make science understandable to everyone, including science haters.”

“Today we see widespread conflict over interpretations of scientific data and questioning of fact; broadening an appreciation for science still matters,” Miller said, citing other examples of continuing relevance. “AAPB and the Peabody Awards Collection allow scholars to explore regional approaches to issues of national concern and to compare yesterday’s coverage to today’s headlines. Among the titles chosen for inclusion in this project are over 100 programs that look at issues of policing, crime, and police-community relations.”

The BMA is housed at the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries. The focus of the Libraries’ efforts is to engage UGA students, which includes the creation of the Special Collections Teaching Fellows program. During the 2017-2018 academic year, seven of the Fellows will use materials from the Peabody Awards Collection, and one Fellow’s class is based entirely on Peabody materials. Many other UGA faculty members use archival materials for their courses, but incorporation of non-digitized titles has proved problematic for student research projects because of the time required to digitize the media. Having these programs digitized will greatly improve their chances of being used for student research and classroom instruction at UGA.

The Brown Media Archives was established in 1995 at the University of Georgia with the Peabody Awards Collection as the foundation of its holdings. The BMA has grown to include regional newsfilm, home movies, interviews, and folk music, among other audio and moving image genres. With the evolution of media, the Peabody Awards have also evolved, adding cable content, international programming, web content, and streaming programming. In addition to the recorded media itself, most submissions include documentation such as press releases, clippings, scripts, audience feedback, and ephemera.

About the American Archive of Public Broadcasting
The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and the WGBH Educational Foundation to coordinate a national effort to preserve at-risk public media before its content is lost to posterity and provide a central web portal for access to the unique programming that public stations have aired over the past 70 years. To date, over 50,000 hours of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized for long-term preservation and access. The entire collection is available on location at the Library of Congress and WGBH, and more than 30,000 programs are available online at americanarchive.org.

About WGBH
WGBH Boston is America’s preeminent public broadcaster and the largest producer of PBS content for TV and the Web, including Masterpiece, Antiques Roadshow, Frontline, Nova, American Experience, Arthur and more than a dozen other prime-time, lifestyle, and children’s series. WGBH also is a leader in educational multimedia, including PBS LearningMedia™, and a pioneer in technologies and services that make media accessible to the 36 million Americans who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, or visually impaired. WGBH has been recognized with hundreds of honors: Emmys, Peabodys, duPont-Columbia Awards…even two Oscars. Find more information at www.wgbh.org.

About the Library of Congress
The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States – and extensive materials from around the world – both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Join the American Archive of Public Broadcasting for a Road Trip through the Archive!

 

Archives Road Trip | Public Broadcasting | New Special Collection

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Starting July 5th, the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is taking a virtual road trip through the archive! Time nor space defines this trip, just an all-access pass to content that tells the story of America’s nostalgia and national identity through raw interviews, newscasts, local documentaries, and lectures among other treasures!

Access the AAPB Road Trip Special Collection here! http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/aapb-road-trip.

Selected clips from AAPB’s participating organizations will be shared through AAPB’s social media outlets (@amarchivepub), and you can view the programs in-full within the AAPB Road Trip Special Collection. The collection will be updated with new clips as the summer progresses. The segmented clips and their full programs can be found using the AAPB Road Trip interactive map.

Join us as the #AAPBRoadTrip moves from the east to west coast, and back again, visiting local festivals, monuments, lecture halls, national parks, museums, and poetry readings, among other discoveries! The trip will go through September.

The AAPB is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH Education Foundation to preserve and make accessible significant, historical public broadcasting from across the nation. Collections include local broadcasts from over 100 stations, 2.5 billion inventory records, and 32,000 programs available online for the American public.

Stop #17: Bethel, AK – Yupik Dance & Culture with KYUK

This clip is from KYUK’s series Yupik Dance & Culture. See the full interview here.

Stop #16: South Kona, HI – Song of South Knoa with PBS Hawai’i in 1986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from PBS Hawai’i’s series Spectrum Hawai’i. See the full interview here.

Stop #15: Los Angeles, CA – Maya Angelou and Ray Bradbury in the Magic Castle, 1975

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Thirteen WNET’s series Assignment America. See the full interview here.

Stop #14: Las Vegas, Nevada – Millennial Moments: Start of Las Vegas, 1999

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Vegas PBS’ series Millennial Moments. See the full interview here.

Stop #13: Gallup, NM – Navajo Code Talkers with Koahnic Broadcast Corporation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Koahnic Broadcast Corporation’s series National Native News Special Features Assignment America. See the full interview here.

Stop #12: Corpus Christi, TX – Sissy Farenthold: A Texas Maverick from Thirteen WNET

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This clip is from Thirteen WNET’s program Assignment America. See the full interview here.

Stop #11: New Orleans, LA – Louisiana Legends interviews Leah Chase by Louisiana Public Broadcasting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Louisiana Public Broadcasting’s program Louisiana Legends. See the full interview here.

Stop #10: Nashville, TN – Jubilee Singers Interview with American Experience featuring Musicologist Horace Clarence Boyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from the WGBH’s American Experience program the Jubilee Singers. See the full interview here.

Stop #9: Montgomery, AL – Eyes on the Prize Interview with Rosa Parks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from the Film and Media Archive at Washington University. See the full interview here.

Stop #8: Tampa, FL – Neat Stuff: Florida’s Collectors with Oregon Public Broadcasting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Oregon Public Broadcasting. See the full program here.

Stop #7: Georgia Gazette visits the birthplace of the U.S. Girl Scouts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Georgia Public Broadcasting. See the full program here.

Stop #6: North Carolina Museums with North Carolina Now

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from North Carolina Now. See the full program here.

Stop #5: Whitesburg, KY – Appalachian Artists: The Younger Generation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Appalshop, Inc. See the full program here.

Stop #4: Maryland, PA – Nasa-Goddard Space Flight Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from Maryland Public Television. See the full program here.

Stop #3: Lancaster, PA – The American town: A self-portrait; Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, part 1

 

 

 

 

 

This clip is from The University of Maryland Archives. See the full program here.

Stop #2: New York, NY – In the Heights Broadway Musical with Thirteen WNET

 

 

This clip is from a Thirteen WNET program. See the full program here.

Stop #1: Boston, MA – Disco Dancing with WGBH

 

This clip is from a WGBH program. See the full program here.

Open Call for Grant Proposals from The National Recording Preservation Foundation!

There’s an open call for proposals for grants from the National Recording Preservation Foundation (NRPF) until August 15th. Individual grants will be awarded up to $20,000 each.

The following projects are eligible: preservation and/or archiving, digitization, collection appraisal and planning, material or professional conservation, and the creation of means for public and or research access to collections.

NRPF would like to fund projects in each of the following areas: broadcast, spoken word and music, but awards will be made solely on the basis of the proposals themselves.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, write to NRPF at grants@recordingpreservation.org.

Put in the subject line: Request for Grant Application Details. They will send by return email full information on how to apply.

Deadline: August 15, 2018
Grant Awards Announced: September 30, 2018

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The National Recording Preservation Foundation offers grants to non-profit archives, libraries, museums, universities and other entities engaged in the preservation of audio materials that demonstrate cultural or historical importance and are held within the United States of America. In rare cases we may offer grants to commercial entities if a case can be made for the material’s cultural and historical value, the commercial holder cannot fund such preservation itself and a partnership exists with a non-profit entity in the field. Projects leading only to commercial release without an archival preservation component element will most likely be found lacking. The NRPF does not offer grants to individuals unless the materials are housed within a non-profit structure.

Announcing the Second Round of Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellows!

WGBH on behalf of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting is pleased to introduce our second cohort of fellows for the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF), a project funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

The PBPF supports students enrolled in non-specialized graduate programs to pursue digital preservation projects at public broadcasting organizations around the country. The Fellowship is designed to provide graduate students with the opportunity to gain hands-on experiences in the practices of audiovisual preservation; address the need for digitization of at-risk public media materials in underserved areas; and increase audiovisual preservation education capacity in Library and Information Science graduate programs around the country.

Over the summer semester of this year, each fellow will inventory, digitize, and catalog a small collection of audiovisual media; generate technical and preservation metadata; and process the digital files for ingest into the American Archive of Public Broadcasting. The fellows will collaborate with a faculty advisor at their university to complete a handbook which was drafted by the first Fellows, and develop a training workshop for fellow students in the autumn semester. The fellowship will also support a digitization station at each university for the use by the fellows and future students enrolled at the universities.

Please welcome the members of our Summer 2018 PBPF cohort:

Fellow: Laura Haygood
Program: University of Oklahoma
Host Organization: Oklahoma Educational Television Authority
Host Mentor: Janette Thornbrue, Vice President of Operations, Oklahoma Educational Television Authority
Faculty Advisor:Susan Burke, Interim Director and Associate Professor, School of Library and Information Studies
Local Mentor: Lisa Henry, Curator/Archivist, Political Communication Center, Julian P. Kantor Political Commercial Archive

Laura Haygood is a graduate student in the University of Oklahoma’s Master of Library and Information Studies Program. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in History, and she has a background in instrumental music. She works as a Graduate Research Assistant in the Government Documents collection at OU’s Bizzell Library. Laura has volunteered her time at the Moore-Lindsay Historical House Museum, where she wrote an NEH Preservation Grant, as well as at her local public library and local school library. She will complete her MLIS in May 2019. Laura hopes to use this experience digitizing and preserving audiovisual materials to preserve oral histories in the future. Upon completion of her degree, she plans to seek employment in an archive or academic library. Wherever she ends up, Laura’s overarching professional goal is to connect people with the resources they need.

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Fellow: Riley Eren Cox
Program: Clayton State University
Host Organization: Georgia Public Broadcasting
Host Mentor: Ellen Reinhardt, Radio Program Director, Georgia Public Broadcasting
Faculty Advisor: Josh Kitchens, Director, Master of Archival Studies Program
Local Mentor: Kathy Christensen, former VP of News, Archives and Research at CNN

Riley graduated from SUNY Fredonia in May 2017 with xir bachelor’s in History, minors in Anthropology and Museum Studies.  After interning at the Chautauqua Institution for a season in 2015, xe decided to pursue a career in archives.  Riley is currently enrolled in Clayton State University’s Master of Archival Studies program.  Xe will be ending xir time of employment at the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archive, and Rare Book Library at Emory University this summer and is excited to see where this fellowship takes xir.

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Fellow: Steve Wilcer
Program: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Host Organization: WUNC
Host Mentor: Keith Weston, Web Producer and Back Porch Music Host, WUNC
Faculty Advisor: Helen Tibbo, Alumni Distinguished Professor, SILS
Local Mentor: Erica Titkemeyer, Project Director/AV Conservator, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Steve Wilcer is a graduate student in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a current focus in academic libraries and archives. He obtained his undergraduate degree in Music Performance and Composition at Western Illinois University in Macomb, Illinois and his first master’s degree in Musicology from the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. His multifaceted background in music, research, and archival resources led him to explore and pursue library science and preservation, especially regarding audiovisual materials. In addition to music, he is also interested in history, literature, film, and electronic gaming.

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Fellow: Tanya Yule
Program: San Jose State University
Host Organization: Center for Asian American Media in collaboration with the Bay Area Video Coalition
Host Mentor: James Ott, Director of Finance and Administration, Center for Asian-American Media
Faculty Advisor: Alyce Scott, Lecturer, School of Information
Local Mentor: Jackie Jay, Preservation Technician, Bay Area Video Coalition

Tanya Yule is a current MLIS candidate at San José State University, focusing on archives and photography preservation; she received her BFA in photography from the San Francisco Art Institute, with a background in traditional darkroom methods, and photomechanical printing. Tanya is an intern at the Hoover Institution Archives at Stanford University, and resides in San Francisco with her husband and adorable dog Otto.

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Fellow: Eric Saxon
Program: University of Missouri
Host Organization: KOPN Community Radio
Host Mentor: Jacqueline Casteel, KOPN Community Radio
Faculty Advisor: Sarah Buchanan, Assistant Professor, Library and Information Science
Local Mentor: James Hone, Digital Archivist, University Libraries, Washington University in St. Louis

Eric Saxon is a graduate student in the School of Information Science and Learning Technologies at the University of Missouri – Columbia, where he is specializing in archives. His archival research/building interests include anything in danger of being forgotten by the collective memory, a predilection that has led to digital preservation efforts focusing on community centers, an outsider artist, and a WWII Monuments Man.  Eric holds a master’s degree in art history and graduate certificate in digital humanities from the University of Nebraska, and a bachelor’s degree in American studies from Stanford University.

Follow along on their digitization journeys by searching #aapbpf!