AAPB Commemorates the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. Through Public Media

Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK) Day is an annual holiday observed on the third Monday of January to commemorate the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. King was a chief spokesperson for nonviolent activism during the Civil Rights Movement until his assassination in 1968. The campaign for a federal holiday in King’s honor began soon after his death; however, President Ronald Reagan officially signed the holiday into law in 1983, and it was first observed three years later.

As MLK Day aims to celebrate the life and achievements of Dr. King, below is a selection of public radio and television programs that document King’s legacy, including his legendary speeches and influence on society.

1963

  • Context – The 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom featured an estimated 250,000 peaceful demonstrators walking from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial to hear a political call to arms for economic equality and civil rights for African Americans. Credited with being the final impetus to the passing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the event famously ended with Martin Luther King Jr.’s historic “I Have a Dream” speech – recording below.
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Leffler, Warren K, photographer. Civil rights march on Washington, D.C. / WKL. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/2003654393/>.

Series: March on Washington Coverage by Educational Radio Network

Program: I Have a Dream Speech: Martin Luther King, Jr.

Contributing Organization: WGBH (Boston, Massachusetts)

Description: Part 17 of 17, this program includes the Educational Radio Network’s (ERN) coverage of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, including Martin Luther King Jr.’s introduction and speech ““I Have a Dream”.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_15-9xp6v356

1964

June

Series: Long, Hot Summer ’64

Producing Organization: Educational Radio Network

Contributing Organization: WGBH (Boston, Massachusetts)

Description: The Long, Hot Summer ’64 series was a weekly news report documenting the civil rights movement during the summer of 1964. This episode describes the arrest of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. and 14 others on June 11, 1964, when they attempted to eat at the segregated Monson Motel. Reporters include Dr. Robert Hayling, the head of the movement in St. Augustine and two chaplains from Boston University, Bill England and Eugene Dawson, describe beatings during demonstrations that day and during the previous two evenings.

Direct Links:

Episode 1: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_15-50tqk2fw

Episode 2: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_15-02c86fs0

– – –

Episode: Violence

Series: Firing Line with William F. Buckley Jr.

Contribution Organization: Hoover Institution Library & Archives, Stanford University (Stanford, California)

“After the killing of Dr. King and after the killing of Robert Kennedy many, many people … gave their opinions, and I would like to tell you first that everybody seems to know where violence comes from – they know where the riots come from, where the wars come from, where murder comes from. I’m the only one who doesn’t know, so I’m considered an expert – at least I know one should find it out.” – Dr. Wertham, Discussant

Description: Following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy, Dr. Wertham, a practicing psychiatrist and longtime clinical student of violence, discussed how he cuts through the rhetorical excesses of the time. The television series Firing Line with William F. Buckley Jr. was a venue for debate and discussion on political, social, and philosophical issues with experts of the day.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_514-hm52f7kn3h

– – –

July

  • The Civil Rights Act of 1964 is passed — a landmark civil rights and U.S. labor law in the United States that outlaws discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. It prohibits unequal application of voter registration requirements, racial segregation in schools, employment, and public accommodations.
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President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King, Jr. looks on. Photo Source

– – –

October

  • Dr. King won the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolent resistance. Below is a recording of the reception.

Episode: Reception for MLK’s Nobel Prize

Contributing Organization: WNYC (New York, New York)

“[I] can think of no one that has done more to give true meaning to that precious word called ‘peace.'” – Hubert Humphrey speaking of Dr. King.

Description: In celebration of Dr. King’s 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, WNYC recorded the evening’s events including speeches made by Hubert Humphry, New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner Jr., and Dr. King.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_80-4302vwz6

1967

Title: Martin Luther King, Jr. Speaks Against the Vietnam War

Contributing Organization: WYSO (Yellow Springs, Ohio)

Description: In 1967, Martin Luther King, Jr. was President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and spoke against the Vietnam War. This program was produced by the SCLC as part of their “Martin Luther King Speaks” weekly series. The program is about lobbying efforts against proposed welfare legislation that brought together the National Welfare Rights Organization, the Peoples Coalition for Peace and Justice, and the Southern Christian Leadership. Conference. It includes short excerpts of King speaking at the beginning and end of the program.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_27-pr7mp4w42p

1968

April

  • Context – Martin Luther King Jr. was shot at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968. Following MLK’s assassination, performer James Brown was to play a concert in Boston. In an effort to prevent rioting, the Mayor was advised to ask local station WGBH to broadcast the concert. Below is the beginning address of the historic concert.
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James Brown shakes hands with Boston Mayor Kevin White.

Title: James Brown and Mayor Kevin White Address the Crowd at the Boston Garden

Contributing Organization: WGBH (Boston, Massachusetts)

Description: Following Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, James Brown was to play in Boston and is credited with preventing riots by agreeing to broadcast his concert on WGBH. This short excerpt from the 1968 concert features Councilor Tom Atkins and James Brown as they introduce Mayor Kevin White onto the stage at the Boston Garden. White addresses the crowd, urging they respect the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. Brown salutes Mayor White and sings “That’s Life.”

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_15-qz22b8vs2h

– – –

  • Context – The Civil Rights Act of 1968, also known as the Fair Housing Act, is a landmark part of legislation that provided for equal housing opportunities regardless of race, religion, or national origin. The Act was signed into law during the King assassination riots by President Lyndon B. Johnson, who had previously signed the Civil Rights Act 1964 and Voting Rights Act 1965 into law.

Program: Civil Rights: What Next?

Producing Organization: National Educational Television and Radio Center

Contributing Organizations: Library of Congress (Washington, District of Columbia)

Description: This hour-long interconnected public affairs special emanated live from New York City and Washington, D.C., on Thursday, April 11, 1968 at 9 p.m. EST, the day President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights of 1968. The panel studied the meaning of the newly passed Civil Rights Bill in the aftermath of national mourning for Dr. Martin Luther King. Paul Niven moderated the discussion with James Forman, director of international affairs for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC); Hosea Williams, national director of political education for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; and Floyd McKissick, executive director of the Congress of Racial Equality (Core). In Washington were John Field, director of community relations of the U.S. Conference of Mayors; James J. Kilpatrick, nationally syndicated columnist and former editor of the Richmond, Va. News leader; and Congressman Charles Mathias, Jr. (R-MD).

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_15-741rq0bx

– – –

June

Title: Premier Episode of the Black Journal Series

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Coretta Scott King, WNET

Contributing Organizations: Thirteen WNET (New York, New York) and Library of Congress (Washington, District of Columbia)

Description: This episode served as the premiere episode of National Educational Television’s monthly magazine, Black Journal, the first of a series devoted to the interests and concerns of Black America. This segment includes a satire by Godfrey Cambridge, an address by Coretta Scott King, a report on the Poor People’s Campaign, and a study of the African American political reaction to Robert Kennedy’s assassination.

Full program at http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_62-5m6251fv96.

1977

Program: Nine years later: a Black panel on racism and civil rights since the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. (Part 1 of 2)

Contributing Organization: Pacifica Radio Archives (North Hollywood, California)

Producing Organization: KPFA (Radio station: Berkeley, Calif.)

Description: This program contains a panel discussion covering topics such as the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., his impact upon the Civil Rights movement, South Africa, the Vietnam War and the Black community, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Affirmative Action programs, the Bakke decision, capitalism, socialism, U.S. police forces, economics in the Black community, President Carter, racism at the University of California, the firing of Dr. Harry Edwards, and the future of struggle in the United States. Yvonne Golden moderates the panel. Panel members in this first hour include JoNina Abron, Gloria Davis, Dr. Harry Edwards, Enola Maxwell, and Joel Mitchell.

Direct Links –

Part 1: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_28-xg9f47hd10

Part 2: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_28-bc3st7f50p

1983

  • President Ronald Ragan officially signs Martin Luther King Day into law as a federal holiday.

1982

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Episode: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday Commemoration

Contributing Organization: Rocky Mountain PBS (Denver, Colorado)

Description: Prime Time is a weekly program about Denver Public Schools hosted by Ed Sardella. This episode visited Garden Place Elementary School, Hallett Academy, and Manual High School, where students focused on the life and achievements of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_52-580k6kxc

1985

Title: Long Black Song [Part 1 of 2]

Contributing Organization: Louisiana Public Broadcasting (Baton Rouge, Louisiana)

Description: This episode of the series North Star from 1985 focuses on the history of African Americans from the 1860s to the 1960s through the periods of Reconstruction, Segregation and the Civil Rights Movement. It features Dr. Valerian Smith performing excerpts from his musical composition “Tribulations,” a tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr. The host includes Genevieve Stewart, who goes into detail about specific aspects of African American history each episode.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_17-29b5ndnr

1985

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John Lewis’ transcript is searchable and accessible on AAPB’s site!

Title: Interview with John Lewis

Series: Eyes on the Prize

Producing Organization: Blackside, Inc.

Contributing Organization: Film and Media Archive, Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, Missouri)

Description: Interview with John Lewis conducted for Eyes on the Prize. Discussion centers on the voting rights movement in Selma, Alabama, his friendship with Martin Luther King, Jr., the relationship between SCLC and SNCC, his view on the philosophy of nonviolence, and his involvement in the March on Washington.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_151-cz3222s11s#at_674_s

1986

Episode: Rev. Michael Haynes

Series: From the Source

Contributing Organization: WUMB (Boston, Massachusetts)

Description: This episode of From the Source features guest Rev. Dr. Michael Haynes, a contemporary and colleague of Martin Luther King, Jr. and former MA state representative. During the interview, Haynes reflected on the newly-implemented Martin Luther King Day holiday and addressed caller questions about how young people could further King’s dream of racial equality. He also discussed the need to keep the pressure on political leaders regarding civil rights, King’s intellectual prowess, King’s sense of the hypocrisy of the institutional Christian Church in America, King’s 1965 address to the MA Legislature, and the religious foundations of King’s belief in the necessity of non-violence to achieve his goals.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_345-171vhk97

1988

Contributing Organization: NewsHour Productions (Washington, District of Columbia)

Description: This episode of NewsHour Productions features a segment on the 20 years following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_507-804xg9ft7m

1989

Title: Commemorative Program for Martin Luther King, Jr. (1989)

Contributing Organization: WYSO (Yellow Springs, Ohio)

Description: This program was produced in 1989 to commemorate Martin Luther King, Jr. for the national holiday in his honor. It featured an excerpt from the commencement speech he gave at Antioch College in Yellow Springs.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_27-cf9j38kv54

2002

Screen Shot 2019-01-20 at 6.48.41 PM.pngProgram: Martin Luther King Convocation

Series: First Friday

Contributing Organization: Mississippi Public Broadcasting(Jackson, Mississippi)

Description: This episode of First Friday features highlights from Jackson State University’s 33rd Annual Martin Luther King Birthday Convocation. The goal of the ceremony is to celebrate and remember the contributions Dr. King made for nonviolent social change in America.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_60-77fqzfgz

2005

Program: The Contested Legacy of Martin Luther King, JR.

Contributing Organization: Hoover Institution Library & Archives, Stanford University (Stanford, California)

Description: During this program, Clayborne Carson, editor of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s papers, considered what would come of King’s legacy. Carson notes that in his time, King was a controversial figure and that King himself would likely be have been surprised on how lauded he is. Carson argued that there would not be a holiday in his honor if not for (a) the actions of Rosa Parks, et al., and (b) that he was assassinated before he could continue to say more provocative and controversial things authorities do not like to hear. Carson noted the meaning of King’s life was contested while he was alive, and will continue to be contested long after his death.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_514-w37kp7vs1r

2011

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Clayborne Carson, American Experience

Series: American Experience

Episode: Freedom Riders

Contributing Organization: WGBH (Boston, Massachusetts)

Description: Explore four raw interviews with Clayborne Carson, a professor of history at Stanford University, and director of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_15-qz22b8vs2hfixitt


About the AAPB:

The AAPB is a national effort to preserve at-risk public media and provide a central web portal for access to the programming that public stations and producers have created over the past 70 years. To date, over 90,000 items of television and radio programming contributed by more than 100 public media organizations and archives across the United States have been digitized, and the Archive aims to grow by up to 25,000 additional hours per year. The entire collection is available for research on location at WGBH and the Library, and currently, more than 37,000 programs are available in the AAPB’s Online Reading Room at americanarchive.org to anyone in the United States.

Donate to the AAPB here! http://americanarchive.org/donate


Curated by Ryn Marchese, AAPB Engagement and Use Manager

A Retrospective on WGBH and Experimental Television, 1968-1970

This year, the WGBH Media Library and Archives (MLA), a participating station of the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), has begun hosting quarterly archives screenings as part of the WGBH Insiders Screening Series. Last week’s screening, A Retrospective on WGBH and Experimental Television from 1968-1970, offered a unique look into WGBH’s role as one of the first public media stations to explore television as an artistic medium. Over 100 members and guests visited WGBH to view segments of WGBH’s experimental television, including What’s Happening, Mr. Silver?; Madness and Intuition, The Medium is the Medium, and Violence Sonata.

Panelists included:

• Fred Barzyk, the original producer of WGBH’s series New Television Workshop

• George Fifield, Founder and Director of Boston Cyberarts Inc.

• Aldo Tambellini, Multimedia artist who created work for WGBH/Public Broadcasting Laboratory’s 1969 production called The Medium is the Medium

The event was moderated by Ryn Marchese, Engagement and Use Manager for the American Archive of Public Broadcasting, and Peter Higgins, Archives Manager at WGBH Media Library and Archives. Digital Archives Manager Leah Weisse curated an exhibit of relevant production and promotional materials to provide context to the evening’s focus. AAPB and MLA thank Elizabeth Hagyard for her support and collaboration on the event, as well as other staff in events, legal, marketing, and engineering, and WGBH volunteers who helped make the night a success!

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Introductory slide for The Medium is the Medium (1969) displaying the six contributing artists. From left to right on stage: Peter Higgins, Ryn Marchese, Fred Barzyk, and George Fifield.
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Aldo Tambellini speaks about his video art in The Medium is the Medium (1969).
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Digital Archives Manager Leah Weisse curated an exhibit of relevant production and promotional materials to provide context to the evening’s focus.

Event slide deck:

Original post from WGBH Media Library and Archives’ blog at https://wordpress.com/view/blog.openvault.wgbh.org.

Vote for AAPB’s Breakout Session Proposal for the PBS Annual Meeting!

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‘Engage Your Community to Celebrate Your History’ – Voting closes January 11th!

Help the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) connect with more public television colleagues by voting for our PBS Annual Meeting session proposal: ‘Engage Your Community to Celebrate Your History’.

Vote for #12 at https://pbs.us18.list-manage.com/track/click?u=1ef18d7e30fe3109d60695e37&id=1015068778&e=0fc245cef2!

Many stations have piles of tapes in closets, basements, off-site storage, or hard drives under desks, that represent our local and national cultural heritage. The AAPB has proposed a session to help stations learn about easy steps toward preserving and making their collection available. Through collaborative grants with stations both large and small, the AAPB has preserved nearly 100,000 programs and original materials contributed by 125 TV and radio stations.

Joining the session would be Broadcast Journalist Judy Woodruff, Chair of our Executive Advisory Council and from the PBS NewsHour, Archivist Chris Alexander from WETA, and AAPB Stations and Producers Advisory Committee Member Kevin Crane from Nashville Public Television to discuss preservation, funding, and engaging initiatives that help preserve broadcasting’s legacy!

It’s as easy as:

  1. Click the voting link: https://pbs.us18.list-manage.com/track/click?u=1ef18d7e30fe3109d60695e37&id=1015068778&e=0fc245cef2
  2. Press ‘NEXT’ to #12
  3. Select AAPB’s Session titled ‘Engage Your Community to Celebrate Your History’
  4. Click ‘NEXT’ until you’ve submitted!

Please spread the word with your fellow pubmedia fans! Thank you.

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PBPF Program Equipment Plans

Here are the Program Equipment Plans from the Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship (PBPF)!

One of the goals of the Fellowship was to increase audiovisual preservation education in Library and Information Science (LIS) Programs. To accomplish this goal, funds were used to purchase digitization equipment for four of the five (LIS) Programs involved in the Fellowship:

University of Missouri
University of North Carolina
University of Oklahoma
Clayton State University

Because San Jose State University is a distance program with no physical campus, grant funds for the San Francisco Fellowship were used to purchase equipment for the Bay Area Video Coalition that was designated for the use of future SJSU students.

Host Mentors, Faculty Mentors, and Local Mentors collaborated to decide which types of equipment to purchase, and were responsible, along with the Fellows, for setting up the equipment once it arrived.

Each LIS Program has written about their plans for the equipment’s use outside of the Fellowship. Programs’ plans range from continued digitization work to incorporation of the equipment into the LIS curriculum to making the equipment available to students interested in pursuing internships in digitization.

Check out the Programs’ plans to find out more:

University of Missouri Equipment Plans

University of North Carolina Equipment Plans

San Jose State University and Bay Area Video Coalition Equipment Plans

University of Oklahoma Testimonial by Lisa Henry

University of Oklahoma Equipment Plans

Clayton State University Equipment Plans

#InnovationMonday: Dr. Michael DeBakey and Heart Surgery

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Want to help make this interview searchable and accessible online? While listening to Dr. DeBakey’s interview, audiences can edit the grammatical errors made in the computer-generated transcript at http://fixitplus.americanarchive.org/transcripts/cpb-aacip_17-73bzmhcc!

Produced by Louisiana Public Broadcasting (LPB), this episode of the series “Louisiana Legends” (1982) features the first part of an interview with Dr. Michael DeBakey, a native of Lake Charles, LA who was a preeminent surgeon whose innovations revolutionized heart surgery. During his interview, Dr. DeBakey discusses his father’s immigration to Lake Charles from Lebanon, how he became interested in the heart, the impact of Dr. Alton Ochsner on his career, and his interactions with President Richard Nixon, President John F. Kennedy, and President Lyndon B. Johnson.

“Louisiana Legends” is a talk show hosted by Gus Weill conducting in-depth conversations with Louisiana cultural icons. This series has been digitized and preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) and the public can help make this interview searchable and accessible through the Transcribe to Digitize Challenge!

How does it work? The AAPB has created computer-generated transcripts for each radio and television program in the archive. Stations like LPB are engaging the public to help correct puncutation or misspelled words to make the program available online. These programs are then searchable by keywords and timestamps much like this interview with James Baldwin (WGBH, 1963) – http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_15-0v89g5gf5r.

You can start editing here http://fixitplus.americanarchive.org/transcripts/cpb-aacip_17-73bzmhcc.

Or watch the full interview at http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_17-73bzmhcc.

To learn how the Transcribe to Digitize Challenge is providing FREE digitization to AAPB’s participating organizations, visit https://americanarchivepb.wordpress.com/2018/10/22/aapbs-transcribe-to-digitize-challenge-with-george-blood/.

Thank you!

A New Archivist’s First Time at AMIA

When I Googled “work conferences” for tips, other searches showed up like “I hate going to conferences”, “work conference anxiety”, and “how to survive a conference”. Although conferences present a great opportunity to create and strengthen connections in your field, learn new skills and concepts, and see what your peers are up to, they can be difficult. As a new archivist, I am beginning to learn first-hand just how useful (and sometimes challenging) conferences can be. Having recently returned from the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA)’s 2018 conference in Portland, Oregon, it now seems like an appropriate time to write a digest of my time at AMIA and the state of this particular conference, from a first-timer’s perspective.

The first thing that struck me about AMIA was that, with its maybe 800 attendees, it is relatively small, especially when compared to the only other conference I have attended, hosted by the Society of American Archivists (SAA), in which a few thousand attendees converged on Washington D.C. in August.

However, this isn’t necessarily a bad thing. AMIA’s smaller numbers meant that I didn’t have to constantly battle people for space in elevators, conference halls, and poster sessions. Talks at AMIA always had enough seats to accommodate the numbers in the room, and even when chairs did run out, there was always enough room to pull in a few more.

The smaller group at AMIA also meant that people were able to give and receive a lot more face-time with their fellow attendees. At every committee meeting that I sat in on, meeting leaders called upon members by name, and everybody seemed to know the expertise of other members, which bolstered the sense of community at AMIA. It was also fairly common for presenters to call upon people by name during Q&A sessions, since they clearly had some level of an established professional relationship. The smaller numbers also made it easier to introduce myself to strangers, since I wasn’t crabby from being in crowds all day, and I was encouraged to partake in this who’s-who world of archivists.

In meeting new people, I was greatly aided by one of the programs that AMIA offered, in which seasoned veterans of AMIA volunteered as guides for first-timers. Volunteers wore bright yellow badges to encourage first-time conference attendees to say hello or ask for guidance, which, as a first-timer myself, I thought was a nice service that gave me a hint of who was at least somewhat approachable. Luckily, my supervisor Rebecca Fraimow was one such volunteer, and she graciously introduced me to many of her friends, colleagues, and former classmates while at AMIA.

Along with new faces, I was also able to see some familiar faces, since conferences are a natural meeting point for colleagues normally distributed around the country. This is especially true for me and my colleagues, who work with the American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB), a collaboration between WGBH and the Library of Congress, which is dedicated to preserving content from public media creators around the United States. Because of the wide distribution of colleagues involved in the AAPB, we are often limited in our ability to meet personally, which makes the ability to meet at conferences all the more important.

At AMIA I was able to chat with Jason Corum, a WGBH employee who now works remotely from California; Rachel Curtis, of the Library of Congress, to whom I am constantly sending files, and with whom I and Jim Hone of WUSTL had a long conversation about the vagaries of mid-west and east coast weather; Callie Holmes and Mary Miller of the University of Georgia, partners with WGBH in the Peabody Project; and of course Evelyn Cox and Laura Haygood, two students at the University of Oklahoma who were presenting a poster called “Collaboration & Replicability: Passing on the Knowledge of AV Station Creation”, which was based on their work as Fellows at the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority as part of WGBH’s Public Broadcasting Preservation Fellowship. Since it is so rare that I see all of these far-flung colleagues, AMIA provided a great opportunity to connect with them in person.

Another positive part of AMIA was that there was personal time factored into AMIA’s schedule. Each day around 12pm and 6pm, sessions would cease so that conference attendees could take naps, grab food, or go sightseeing around Portland, which, as somebody who gets grouchy when I’m hungry, I greatly needed and appreciated.

Of course, the talks that these breaks were scheduled around were also great. My favorites tended to be more theoretical than technical, since as a new archivist I am curious to hear perspectives on how the field may change in the course of my career. The most interesting talk to me was the prescient “Everything In your Archive Is Now Fake”, a discussion on how deepfakes (artificial videos created using AI image synthesis) risk the credibility of the entire notion of the archive as a place of storing authentic videos of real events.

Other conference standouts were a panel on intersectionality, multiple discussions of regional archives, and a talk on working with challenging material, which ranged from the physically challenging (ex: movie-set ephemera), to the morally challenging (ex: pornography). Although I believe that the archives are still fairly conservative in many aspects, I was nonetheless glad that AMIA was willing to have challenging conversations about what archivists can do to improve representation of these types of collections.

The only thing that I thought was lacking from the talks were more substantive discussions of attracting and supporting archivists of color and the collections of people of color (POC). I admit that I’m biased since not only am I a POC, but also because my first conference was SAA, where POC issues were a main focus, both of which probably makes me more critical of AMIA’s relative lack of discussion on representing historically marginalized groups (like various POC communities, the LGBT+ community, the disabled community, etc.).

However, I still think that it is worth mentioning that I would have liked more of a discussion on what archivists and archives can do to support archivists and collections of color, since I think it is and will continue to be important as demographic shifts occur in the US. I also would have loved to have seen a committee dedicated specifically to archivists and collections of color (although I was encouraged to see that there’s an LGBT Committee and an International Outreach Committee, which has engaged in foreign-language accessibility, like Pamela Vízner Oyarce’s collaborative effort with Lorena Ramírez-López, Erwin Verbruggen, Gloria Ana Diez, and Jo Ana Morfin, to translate the AMIA website into Spanish, and to find Spanish-language resources to link to the AMIA website).

Although I believe that AMIA has work to do in fostering these discussions, I was impressed by the scheduling of screenings, which helped me step outside the standard conference fare of talks and mixers. I especially enjoyed the Archival Screening Night, where the audience was treated to as many six-minute video segments as three hours would allow. The videos were a refreshing way to see what my fellow moving image archivists had been working on and was a reminder that we have the privilege to work with really cool material with some great history. My personal favorite was a Singaporean kung-fu film from the 1970s that was banned by the government of Singapore for its depiction of corruption and crime, resulting in the film being stored in the lead actor’s refrigerator for over 30 years.

All in all, AMIA was fun, informative, and enjoyable. The conference reaffirmed for me that conferences are more than their commonly-held perception as a thing to be survived. The care that I saw for people on the individual level at AMIA demonstrated to me that it is a true community, one with flaws, but a community nonetheless. I believe that Casey Davis Kaufman and the rest of the AMIA board put it best when, at the opening session, they sang that “we are AMIA”.

National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Conference Resources

Available Online: 35,000+ Educational Video and Audio Resources and Primary Sources

The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) recently met with K-12 educators, administrators, and teachers-in-training at the annual National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Conference, a melding of the minds to help advocate and build capacity for high-quality social studies through leadership, services, and support.

As a collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH Educational Foundation, the AAPB provides an online archive, open and available to the public, of historic public radio and television programs from across the nation, spanning public broadcasting’s 70+ year history. From local and regional to national productions, the AAPB allows the public to access 36,000 (and growing) programs and original materials, from local news and documentaries to talk shows and raw interviews, and more all available at americanarchive.org!

To learn more about the AAPB, watch this informational video with example clips at https://vimeo.com/108272934.


For easier access and navigation, below is a deeper dive into AAPB’s resources:

LocalContent

The AAPB provides online access to users anywhere in the United States with a wide range of historic public television and radio programs that were submitted for digitization by more than 120 stations and archives from across the country. More than 36,000 programs are available online for research, educational and informational purposes, spanning public broadcasting’s 70+ year history. The entire collection is available for research on location at WGBH and the Library of Congress.

*Start with AAPB’s Road Trip Special Collection at http://americanarchive.org/special_collections/aapb-road-trip!

Check out our participating organizations at http://americanarchive.org/participating-orgs.


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Because of the geographical breadth of the material, students can use the collection to help uncover ways that national historical events played out on the local scene. The long chronological reach from the late 1940s to the present provides researchers with previously inaccessible primary source material to document change over time.


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Some notable collections are featured on the Special Collections page with finding aids that include information such as the scope and content of the collection, provenance and background information about its creator and source, recommended search strategies, and related resources. Collections include:

Raw interviews –

Screen Shot 2018-12-06 at 12.34.25 PM.png1964 (American Experience)
The Abolitionists (American Experience)
Jubilee Singers (American Experience)
Freedom Riders (American Experience)
The Murder of Emmett Till (American Experience)
Reconstruction (American Experience)
Africans in America (WGBH)

American Masters (WNET)
Ken Burn’s The Civil War (American Documentaries, Inc.)

Early educational broadcasting –

National Association of Educational Broadcasters Programs
National Educational Television Collection

Locally and nationally distributed programs and documentaries –

Center for Asian American Media
Firing Line
Georgia Gazette (GPB)
Oklahoma Educational Television Authority (OETA) News and Cultural Programming
PBS NewsHour
Say Brother (WGBH)
Vision Maker Media Documentaries
Woman (WNED)

Direct link to our Special Collections: http://americanarchive.org/special_collections


AAPB staff and guest curators create exhibits of selected programs and recordings that focus on themes, topics, and events of cultural and historical significance. Primary and secondary sources contextualize a curatedexhibit1-e1544117844344.pngdiversity of perspectives concerning the exhibit’s focus and as a result, AAPB exhibits often illuminate how public broadcasting stations and producers have covered topics such as the Watergate hearings, climate change, protesting in America, civil rights, and more!

Direct link to our Curated Exhibits: http://americanarchive.org/exhibits


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Contact Ryn Marchese, AAPB’s Engagement and Use Manager, to inquire about bringing these materials into your classroom: ryn_marchese@wgbh.org!

And feel free to share our resource with your local school, public and academic librarians! We’ve created a AAPB Library Communications Kit with details on how to describe the AAPB on website/resource guides and embed our player and harvest metadata from our catalog. We’ve also included a link to our webinar with the Boston Library Consortium on the “Accessibility of AAPB in Academic Libraries,” most of which will be applicable to the public librarian community.

For information about the AAPB that you can print for your classroom, email to fellow teachers, or post about online, feel free to use our Informational Flyer!


Most recommended content during NCSS?

Based on our conversations with teachers, below are a few programs we most recommended during the conference!

  1. PBS NewsHour Special Collection – The PBS NewsHour Collection includes more than 8,000 episodes of PBS NewsHour’s predecessor programs from October 1975 to December 2007 covering local and national conversations.
  2. “Gavel-to-Gavel”: The Watergate Scandal and Public Television Curated Exhibit – Here you will find guides to each episode of the public hearings that were digitized, links to transcripts, and highlights to peruse. To help identify people in the videos, the Cast of Characters page includes photos and titles for the important figures in the hearings. The Watergate Scandal, 1972-1974 page gives an explanation of the who, what, when, where, and why of Watergate to help guide you through the coverage. If you would like a more in depth essay on the significant role that Watergate played in the history of public broadcasting, please click on the Watergate and Public Broadcasting link.
  3. Field Trip Series from Main Public Broadcasting – Field Trip is a series of short educational documentaries that explore Maine’s history, culture, and agriculture from fish hatcheries to how low/high tides work — there’s so much to explore!
  4. Local Content – Search our participating stations for local content!

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The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is a collaboration between the Library of Congress and WGBH Educational Foundation in Boston that preserves and makes accessible significant public radio and television programs before they are lost to posterity. The AAPB collection includes more than 50,000 recorded hours comprising over 90,000 digitized and born-digital programs, and original materials dating back to the late 1940s, and is growing!

Written by Ryn Marchese, AAPB Engagement and Use Manager

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@amarchivepub

Remembering George H.W. Bush through Public Broadcasting

Today the nation lays to rest George Herbert Walker Bush, America’s 41st president who lived a long life dedicated to public service until his death at the age of 94. The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) is honored to have preserved for modern audiences several historic public television and radio programs featuring or discussing President Bush, providing the American public the opportunity to learn more about his remarkable career in moving images and sound.

Below is a curated selection of programs with, or related to, George H.W. Bush beginning with his role as CIA Director, then on to his presidential campaigns, moderated debates, and the local reactions to his impact as a leading politician. All programs are available online thanks to the listed contributing stations.

1976

The CIA and the Intelligence Community from the Hoover Institution Library and Archives, Stanford University

In this episode of Commonwealth Club of California, George H.W. Bush discussed the responsibilities of the director of central intelligence (DCI), the role of the CIA, and the central importance of national security. He also talked about secrecy, accountability, and having faith in the strength and effectiveness of our democratic institutions.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_514-2j6833np4c

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George Bush in Boston from 10 O’Clock News

As a former CIA director, George H. W. Bush, spoke on national security and foreign affairs. In regards to relations with South American countries, Bush explained his belief that one should not use 1977 morals to pass judgment on events that happened in the past. He denied allegations that the CIA used the African Swine Fever Virus in Cuba to “destabilize”. Also denied that he ever authorized any use of chemical or biological warfare agents. He touched briefly on his potential candidacy for presidency.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_15-5t3fx73z3d

1979

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– George Bush Profile; George Bush for President from The MacNeil/Lehrer Report

The main topic of this episode was George H.W. Bush’s candidacy for president of the United States. The guests included Bush’s three campaign leaders Peter Teeley, David Keene, and James Baker, as well as George H.W. Bush.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_507-db7vm43k4v

Presidential Hopeful George H.W. Bush from Iowa Public Television
Iowa Press interviewed George H.W. Bush, a relatively unknown candidiate at the time and his strategy to leverage Iowa toward his party.

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Debates with Six Republican Presidencial Candidates from Iowa Public Television

This presidential debate recorded by Iowa Public Television included panelists Rep. Phil Crane Of Illinois, Senate Minority Leader Howard Baker Of Tenn., John Connally Of Texas, Sen. Robert Dole Of Kansas, George H.W. Bush Of Texas, and Rep. John Anderson of Illinois.

Part 1 direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_37-83kwhj7b

Part 2 direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_37-569325t0

1984

Debate between Vice President George Bush and Geraldine Ferraro produced by The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour, contributed by Iowa Public Television

 

This debate focused on Vice President Bush and vice presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro on foreign and domestic affairs.

Part 1 direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_37-72b8h3np

Part 2 direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_37-19f4qw2s

1988

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– The Bush Record from The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour

In the latter half of this episode, The MacNeil Lehrer NewsHour covered the political record of the new republican presidential nominee, George H.W. Bush.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_507-862b85443p

 

– A Firing Line Debate: Resolved: That George Bush and the Republican Party Are Better Able to Run the Country for the Next Four Years Than Michael Dukakis and the Democratic Party from Firing Line with William F. Buckley

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The television series Firing Line with William F. Buckley Jr. was a venue for debate and discussion on political, social, and philosophical issues with experts of the day. In this episode, Buckley hosted a panel to discuss Bush’s impact as president, over that of his opponent’s, Michael Dukakis.

Direct Link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_514-4f1mg7gh5j

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Andrew Young and NAACP members criticize Bush from 10 O’Clock News

In this episode of WGBH’s 10 O’Clock News, Deborah Wang noted that many members of the Legal Defense Fund were skeptical of President George Bush’s commitment to civil rights; she added that civil rights advocates were worried about Bush making conservative appointments to the judiciary. Wang reported that there would be several openings in lower courts and a possible opening on the Supreme Court during Bush’s term in office.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_15-9ks6j45g

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– The Week of the the 41st Presidencial Inauguration from NewsHour Productions

In this episode, essayist Roger Rosenblatt discussed George H.W. Bush’s inauguration and his role in Civil Rights.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_507-j678s4kf08

*Start at timecode 49:20

Screen Shot 2018-12-05 at 11.22.01 AM.png– What the Presidency Means for Business from Maryland Public Television

From the Wall Street Week series, this episode compared the monetary impact of Ronald Reagan’s presidency verses Bush’s. Guests included Reagan’s budget chief, a top Wall Street money man, and a leading invester of Europe.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_394-7957421w

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Speaking for Bush from Maryland Public Television

From this episode of Wall Street Week, Lynn M. Martin, United States Secretary of Labor under President George H.W. Bush, spoke on President Bush’s economic policies.

Direct link: http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_394-28nck2pq

 

Written by Ryn Marchese, AAPB Engagement and Use Manager

Help Support the AAPB for #GivingTuesday!

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Image from WCTE’s 1984 episode on Computer Skills from the Issues in Education series preserved at http://americanarchive.org/catalog/cpb-aacip_23-17crjgjv!

 

For #GivingTuesday, please consider donating to the American Archive of Public Broadcasting! Help us continue to preserve and make accessible the archives and legacy of public media from across the nation.

A donation directly enables us to, among other things:

  • Grow the amount of content available to the public in our Online Reading Room
  • Improve our website with new features and improve functionality and discoverability of the collection
  • Sustain AAPB technical infrastructure so that we can continue to provide online access to the collection
  • Support the curation of exhibits and special collections that explore historical topics or themes as covered by public radio and television
  • Help provide engagement opportunities for new organizations to contribute their collections to the AAPB
  • Improve metadata and searchability of the AAPB so that researchers can better find content relevant to their research topic

Type ‘gif giving’ in the comment box of your donation at http://americanarchive.org/donate and we’ll post a new gif from the archive!

THANK YOU for helping us keep over 70 years of American History at the fingertips of the next generation. Make a donation here: http://americanarchive.org/donate.

Where Does Your #GivingTuesday Donation Go?

#GT_logo_0
GivingTuesday
For #GivingTuesday, please consider donating to the American Archive of Public Broadcasting! Help us continue to preserve and make accessible the archives and legacy of public media from across the nation.

A donation directly enables us to, among other things:

  • Grow the amount of content available to the public in our Online Reading Room
  • Improve our website with new features and improve functionality and discoverability of the collection
  • Sustain AAPB technical infrastructure so that we can continue to provide online access to the collection
  • Support the curation of exhibits and special collections that explore historical topics or themes as covered by public radio and television
  • Help provide engagement opportunities for new organizations to contribute their collections to the AAPB
  • Improve metadata and searchability of the AAPB so that researchers can better find content relevant to their research topic

THANK YOU for helping us keep over 70 years of American History at the fingertips of the next generation. Make a donation here: http://americanarchive.org/donate.